Leif in Calif

Restoration vs. Preservation ??

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Leif,

         If your storage is at the airport, do you happen to know Rich Kreiloff and/or Gary Moore?

Greg

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6 hours ago, chistech said:

How about a product designed for the problem? WD40; water displacement formula, 40th mixture.  Designed to be wiped on originally.

 

Larsen aimed to develop a line of rust-prevention solvents and degreasers for use in the aerospace industry. He succeeded at the goal, Water Displacement, on the 40th attempt, hence the name.

 

WD-40 turns to a sticky goo in short order.  I wont allow it anywhere near my equipment.  When I was working in the aircraft repair industry my boss threatened immediate termination if hes saw someone bring it in.  To me, WD-40 has always been a product in search of a 'market' (a man without a country if you will).  One thing that WD-40 does very well...its their marketing department: they make up 'uses' for it, and the public keeps eating it up.

 

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I love WD 40.  It works great for creating a film on stuff to prevent rusting and corrosion.  I liberally apply gallons of it on my truck under the hood and in nooks and crannies to prevent northeast salt rot.  Seems to work perfectly.  For heavy spray areas I use fluid film.  You can never have too much.  Ironically WD40 is also an excellent cleaner for cleaning grease off or softening up hardened grease.  I probably go through 2 or 3 gallons a year. Works good at getting pitch off too if it's not hard.

When my Friend did the heads on my diesel truck and pressure washed everything clean first,  it looked like a brand new truck under the hood with no corrosion on anything metal/ aluminum components.  It's now slimed back up again.  I'll take slime over rust any day.

I've often thought I should spray the underneath of my Olds with it one of these days to prevent it from flash rusting any more than it has. 

It's a good lubricant to use for wet sanding original finishes (you don't plan to repaint)  that have cracks and any kind of rust so you are sealing the rust to a degree instead of applying water to it.  I use it on Chrome with 0000 steel wool to clean up original oxidized chrome.  It seems to prevent scratching to a degree you get when doing it just dry.  

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I use WD40 to prevent rusting on the surfaces of my lathe and vertical miller in my garage to keep them from rusting that’s why I mentioned it.  Also put it on my table saw, band saw, and drill presses. Anything with a metal machined surface is prone to rusting if your garage is damp. The WD -40 does as good as job as the most expensive fogging oil you can buy.

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Another thought, while in agreement with the preservation advice, how hard would it be to make of find the lower radiator shell bottom piece and solder it in.  Then Prime the repair with red oxide primer and paint it (Just the new piece) with red lacquer overly thinned.  It sprays on like old oxidized paint.  My 2 cents work.

Edited by Paul Dobbin
missing words (see edit history)
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Stay with the patina, period.  If a vehicle like your truck was under my watch, I'd simply dilute some SAE 90 with kerosene and with a hand-squeezed oil squirter, spray the rusted areas liberally. The kero evaporates and will leave long term rust prevention. So what if some of the oil runs out the crank opening, it just makes it look more original. Unrestored cars always have oil leaks.

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Don’t restore this one . Getting very hard to find a benchmark vehicle like this one.

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I use WD40 for switches that quit, Just find that tiny crack at a corner or seam and shoot it liberally. Switches come back to life.

I also use it to help remove sticker goo. Price tags and such.

To hear that it turns to sticky goo has not been my experience.

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My '32 Terraplane coupe has plenty of patina, (it is very original and unrestored) which I plan to leave as is. Another benefit is that I can enjoy as is without time and money spent on disassembly and paint. However I do plan on restoring the interior to original,   as its seen better days and I'd rather be comfortable on new mohair!

20181110_151345.jpg

20181110_175021.jpg

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Does this Harwood quote apply to my car?

quote: " A layer of surface scale will not typically get worse without constant exposure to the elements and will often protect the metal underneath under mild conditions. Often better to leave it alone ..."

 

I am told by the mechanic (not a body man) that

-the underside is a mess,

-the rear suspension needs replacing ,that

-the brake lines are rusted front to back w/bad booster and master cylinder

and that he can't do anything with it.

 

The car is very clean, under 40k miles, good under the hood

and I' m not ready to give up on it.

Should I go first to a body shop?

Would paying for a couple hours of de-rusting be a good idea?

Should they leave a layer of surface scale? (I am in a mild climate)

 

Thanks for any informed advice

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Posted (edited)

The surface oxide layer actually helps reduce further corrosion, but the surface must be sealed from moisture to stop corrosion.  If you like the patina, Fix the brakes & suspension parts and just coat the surface rust on the body with wax to stop further corrosion.

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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-the brake lines are rusted front to back w/bad booster and master cylinder

 

those need to be treated or replaced, or your lines will blow out.

 

 

even some mat finish black spray paint is an improvement.........

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I would use Boeshield T-9 on it. 

 

I used it on the metal parts of the 37 ft Sailboat I kept year round in the salt water of the Chesapeake Bay and never had a corrosion issue.

 

https://boeshield.com/automotive-motorcycle/

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