erichill

Company to reline my Chandler brake bands

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In search of a company that can reline by external and internal brake bands on my 1919 Chandler. Of a supplier for the brake lining itself though not sure how to countersink the holes for rivets.  Thanks. Eric

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Eric, You can but bits that have a pilot drill head on the end and a flat spade like cutter to undercut the material . Or you can send out to Ft Wayne brake and clutch  (Ind) . They do great work. Measure up the length and width of the material needed and they will quote a price.

brill bits for brakes.jpg

Edited by mikewest (see edit history)

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Mikewest and Hwellens thanks for the info. I did recently find the spec page you showed which will be a big help. I will contact the company in Indiana. 

Thanks

Eric

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One solution I used for Dad's 1920 Overland was an Elevator Company. 

They use (or used?) brake lining material for the brakes on elevators and had the proper rivets and machinery to redo his. If you have such a company close by it might be worth your while to ask.

Elevators have as much risk as brakes on a car (maybe even more).

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Try your local NAPA store. Mine sent my internal and external brakes to a shop that does heavy duty brake rebuilding and they did an excellent job. No shipping charge either as they have a truck that runs back and forth every day. 

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I switched to bonded linings 30 years ago  on my 2 wheel braked Packard with external and internal linings.    No problems with those linings after 30 years and many long distance tours.     The linings are high friction woven material.    

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If you are the do-it yourself type, it is easy to get a little kit from Model T people like Langs.  Often you can find the lining on ebay.  Just make sure you get the old fashioned woven lining as new bonded type will wear out your shoes.

Edited by nickelroadster
addition (see edit history)

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Thanks for the suggestions. The only fear I have with doing it myself is properly countersinking the rivet holes.  I will try Napa or local shops for suggestions for someone local to do the lining. I will have to research the difference between woven and bonded lining.

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I will have to research the difference between woven and bonded lining.  All types of linings can be bonded including woven.  Your Chandler needs woven linings

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High Tech = Bad and Low Tech = Good.  You will want woven linings.  The people installing will say something like:  That is low tech and you will only get 10-20K miles out of them and your reply should be = Perfect. 

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The reason for using woven linings on cars with mechanical brakes and harder linings on cars with hydraulic brakes is all about the friction factor between linings and drum.  Mechanical brakes exert a lower pressure between lining and drum than hydraulic brakes and the lining material needs to be matched to the application.  Woven works better than hard molded linings at the lower pressures and harder moulded linings work better at the higher pressure obtained with hydraulic brakes.   Having said that there are many grades of both woven and hard linings and specialist advice from a company experienced with the older cars is advisable.

 

I have no expertise in this area, the above is what was explained to me years ago by a company specializing in the supply of friction materials.

 

The question of bonded versus riveted is more about whether you want to do it yourself or have the job outsourced.  I am not aware of any negatives with bonded - I do not know if riveting is still done by any of the brake shops.     Riveting requires care in cutting the flat based countersink for the rivets to the right depth, too deep and the lining will let go and this is a l little more difficult to achieve with woven material.    You also need the correct star type punch to spread the rivets and a punch holder to keep the punch aligned to the rivet. 

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If a car is in a damp climate bonded linings will come off the shoe.

That can call for riveted shoes.

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Thanks, Learning a lot here. As for location I am near Atlanta GA.  Have been asking shops around here for recommendations and I am hoping to find someone who can still do the riveting.  Interesting to learn why to use woven with the low pressure application of the mechanical brakes.  I inherited all the parts in boxes, so it was very interesting figuring out the puzzle of the brake linkage for the external bands and how it all worked. 

Thanks for all the input.

Eric

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Posted (edited)

I realize these people are a little off your patch, but they have done a couple of clutch and brake relines for me on my 28 Alfa and done a superb job; fast, efficient and not expensive. Might be worth dropping them an e-mail? They can do riveting or bonding with modern materials.

 

https://saftek.co.uk/friction-products-for-classic-vehicles-and-race-applications/

Edited by Alfa (see edit history)

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Mike thanks for the link to your earlier post. I did find a local shop that's been around for 70 years who are familiar with doing this so I am going to let them.  Figured their labor charge will be money well spent, and I will concentrate on other areas of work on the car.

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What is the name and location of the shop you found?

 

Thanks

 

Dave

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