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Teke

Cylinder Head

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Hey all,

I recently bought a 1989 TC 2.2l SOHC and towed it home.  The previous owner thought that the head gasket was blown, but when I got the head off, it turns out the head was cracked in about 5 spots and pretty badly warped.  I'm now trying to figure out what my options are.  I'm having trouble finding a head specifically for the 2.2 Turbo II and would like some advice.  Does a stock 2.2l head work or do I specifically need one built for the turbo?  What about replacing the engine, could that be worth it?

Thanks in advance!

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The Turbo engines have premium valves and the heads are drilled for cross flow of coolant between the cylinders. UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4501.jpg.eccaa4f3302e75af239278a8f1b249d3.jpg This is a 16V short engine but the block is the same on the 8V engine.

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Ok, so if I needed an 8v head, it would have to be specifically off another TC? Or could I take any chrysler 2.2l SOHC cylinder head?

Thanks!

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You can read more about the differences in turbo and non turbo heads and the different casting. Look under turbo database on thedodgegarage.com website. Gary Donovan and others have put together a lot of good information reguarding the 8v turbo cars. You’ll want a swirl head #782 casting with TS “tapered shroud” engraved on the drivers side of the head. Theyll also have higher nickel content in the valves you can verify with a magnet they’ll be less magnetic than nonturbo valves. Some turbo valves will have a “T” stamped on them. Most likely if the cylinder head has the “TS” engraving it will have turbo valves. Try to stay away for year 87 casted 782 heads they’ve been known to drop valve seats. If you find a Mexican cast 782 years 88-92 those are typically the best. Always be sure to look it over good and make sure it’s straight before you waste time, energy and money on it. Good luck with your project!

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ANY 2.2/2.5 Turbo head '89+ (eliminating the early stuff on purpose) will work.

 

My first question is, why is the head warped? What caused THAT much overheating? Are you *sure* it's warped? You need to check the block as well. I've seen a block/head that somehow became a "matched set" due to odd warping.

 

If there are cracks between the valves, that's completely normal for these heads and not typically detrimental. You mentioned 5 cracks, though, so that worries me.

 

BTW, the neither production 16V block used in Chrysler products are the same as the 8V counterparts. The Maserati block is drilled like a RWD block, but with a turbo drainback. The Lotus TIII block doesn't have a distributor hole. Maybe semantics, but it can be helpful for those that might not know.

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7 hours ago, Reaper1 said:

BTW, the neither production 16V block used in Chrysler products are the same as the 8V counterparts. The Maserati block is drilled like a RWD block, but with a turbo drainback. The Lotus TIII block doesn't have a distributor hole. Maybe semantics, but it can be helpful for those that might not know.

The above statement confuses even me a little; Maybe I'm just getting old!

I have built several engines for '89 2.2L 16 valve TCs using early build '89 2.2L turbo blocks. As far as the holes (may I call them all HOLES?) at the cylinder head surface, they are similar in that there are cross drilled holes in each, for added cylinder wall cooling.

I might add, though superfluous I know. I have also built a 2.5L turbo engine using a 2.2L common block without balance shaft accommodations for my '85 Laser. That also works very well. You really do not need the balance shafts in a 2.5L engine. A lot less hardware spinning around that way. 

When you reference the RWD block, many readers may be confused here, if we don't tell them that you were referring to the early Dodge Dakota Pick-Up truck that had a similar 2.2/2.5 style 4 cylinder engine and was a rear wheel drive vehicle. It was drilled on the left (distributor side) for the left engine mount. There was also a hole that was drilled on that side for the 16V engine's detonation sensor.

I won't even mention the later built 'Dodge Spirit' engine block here in this reply.

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OK, yes. The block dimensions, passages, etc all line up and you can absolutely bolt any of the 11mm headbolt heads to any of the 11mm headbolt blocks.

 

You are correct I was talking semantics regarding the drilled bosses on the block.

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