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drewdrew26

Using Dynacorn reproduction bodies

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Hi guys, I am new to this forum. 

Have any of you built cars using Dynacorn's reproduction bodies? I am interested in building a 1969 Camero. 

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I've had several vehicles with Dynacorn bodies (a '67 Mustang and a Bronco) and the quality was quite good. The guys who built them said that it was nice having all virgin sheetmetal to work with and that for the most part, the quality was good. Their biggest complaints were that sometimes OEM or repro parts from other manufacturers don't fit very well--it seems that Dynacorn uses Dynacorn parts for their tooling so your NOS fenders or hood might not fit without some tweaking on the reproduction body. The second thing--and they ALL griped about this--was that they had no idea how many little parts they would need to buy to make it complete. When you start with a complete car, you have all the little clips and fasteners and tacking strips and what-not that you will need to put it back together. When you start with a bare shell, you get none of that, so not only do you have to track all that down, you don't have a guide to even tell you what you need. An assembly manual can be invaluable in this regard, but they still said that they spent more time and money than expected tracking down all that little stuff that they needed and it added up to a substantial chunk of change that they didn't expect to spend. Even if you're not going 100% stock, you'll still need a lot of those little parts, which definitely add up. The guy who did the Bronco said he'd probably just use a factory truck in the future, no matter how rusty, just because he can fix the rust for less than it cost to buy all that stuff that he would have gotten with a complete vehicle. Of course, a Bronco is made out of flat sheets of metal, so rust repairs aren't as big a deal as with something more complex like a Camaro.

 

Anyway, the quality is good, the virgin steel is nice, but be prepared to do some parts hunting and an extra expense that you may not have considered. Hope this helps!

 

 

 

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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35 minutes ago, drewdrew26 said:

Hi guys, I am new to this forum. 

Have any of you built cars using Dynacorn's reproduction bodies? I am interested in building a 1969 Camero. 

 

A piece of advice.  When you go to register it, you might want to spell it correctly...

 

2-1969-chevrolet-camaro-emblem-jill-rege

 

 

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I once had a chance to buy a complete body shell, on rolling frame, 1955 Chevrolet.  Body done and painted, no engine or trans, no interior, nothing, and I mean nothing, but rolling frame and body shell, with fenders and hood.  No trim, no glass, nothing.

 

When I started adding up all the big and little pieces needed, as mentioned, the finished cost would have been way over value of car then.

 

Matt gives good advice.  Find a good original car to start with and you'll be ahead of the game.....

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even bad original car might make a great parts car for all the odds and ends you need to make it right.  I just check it out and they have 1967/68 Mustang fastback I loves and drove from 1970-1979.  less hood scoop.  Look like a 67 Shelby style scoop to me.   Sure make be wonder about building one. 

 

beach_collage.jpg

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23 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I've had several vehicles with Dynacorn bodies (a '67 Mustang and a Bronco) and the quality was quite good. The guys who built them said that it was nice having all virgin sheetmetal to work with and that for the most part, the quality was good. Their biggest complaints were that sometimes OEM or repro parts from other manufacturers don't fit very well--it seems that Dynacorn uses Dynacorn parts for their tooling so your NOS fenders or hood might not fit without some tweaking on the reproduction body. The second thing--and they ALL griped about this--was that they had no idea how many little parts they would need to buy to make it complete. When you start with a complete car, you have all the little clips and fasteners and tacking strips and what-not that you will need to put it back together. When you start with a bare shell, you get none of that, so not only do you have to track all that down, you don't have a guide to even tell you what you need. An assembly manual can be invaluable in this regard, but they still said that they spent more time and money than expected tracking down all that little stuff that they needed and it added up to a substantial chunk of change that they didn't expect to spend. Even if you're not going 100% stock, you'll still need a lot of those little parts, which definitely add up. The guy who did the Bronco said he'd probably just use a factory truck in the future, no matter how rusty, just because he can fix the rust for less than it cost to buy all that stuff that he would have gotten with a complete vehicle. Of course, a Bronco is made out of flat sheets of metal, so rust repairs aren't as big a deal as with something more complex like a Camaro.

 

Anyway, the quality is good, the virgin steel is nice, but be prepared to do some parts hunting and an extra expense that you may not have considered. Hope this helps!

 

 

 

I am most likely going to make this Camaro a street ride that can also be driven on a track (on rare occasions). I would prefer not to deal with rust, which is why I am leaning towards using Dynacorn reproduction bodies.

How much do you think I am expected to spend? Would this build be around $100,000?

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On 12/25/2018 at 6:11 PM, Matt Harwood said:

If you have $100,000 to spend, buy a finished car.

 

Well said, Matt! I DEFINITELY second that advice. 

 

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Another thought about these all-metal aftermarket bodies... I've seen steel repro bodies assembled by OTHER companies at cheaper prices...with terrible results. For example, one Camaro body which I went to look at for a friend-of-a-friend who was having trouble and asked my opinion. That car's passenger side door bottom had so much clearance between the door sill and the door that you could see light right through it. I have no idea what he must have done to solve that problem. 

 

In my opinion there are still so many original Camaro cars and bodies out there for sale at reasonable prices, and there are several competent professionals who can take out ALL the rusty components and replace them with very good quality sheet metal. Then you end up with a legitimate, unquestionable title and an original VIN on the car, plus all the minor pieces which Matt mentioned above. You will still be able to start out from there with no rust. 

Edited by lump (see edit history)

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Over a long career in and around the muscle car hobby and the industry which serves it, I have often wished that I could fully communicate one critical fact about reproduction sheet metal body panels: THERE ARE MULTIPLE MANUFACTURERS OF A LARGE MAJORITY OF THESE PANELS, and MANY DIFFERENT LEVELS OF QUALITY!

 

The fact is, hobbyists often set themselves up for disappointment when they order these parts, BECAUSE OF THE WAY THEY SHOP!

       EXAMPLE: Joe Shopper wants a new replacement cowl-style hood for his first generation Camaro. So, he finds ads in HEMMINGS or online, and starts calling around checking prices. After calling about a dozen sources, he finally finds the lowest cost for the part itself plus the shipping. But when his new hood arrives he is disappointed with the quality. Then you can hear him griping about the quality of ALL reproduction parts. This drives me crazy! What Joe Shopper failed to understand is that right now, there are AT LEAST 5 different manufacturers of that same hood. Quality varies significantly. But since Joe bought based on final cost alone, he got the worst version on the market. Had he done some research, he would have learned that at least two manufacturers out there make a much better Camaro Fresh Air hood than the others...although their prices are not the cheapest.

 

The same is true about so many reproduction parts for many types of more popular collector cars (I refer to Chevy's and some GM cars, plus Fords from the fifties thru the early 1970's, and Mopars from the early 60's thru the early 70's, etc). Items like emblems, upholstery, weatherstripping, sheet metal, glass, etc, are available from different makers at different levels of quality. Before you make major purchases of reproduction parts, join a club which is focused on your car type, and start asking for advice and opinions, including brand names. Another recommendation is, once you have found a retailer that you feel you can trust, ASK them if there is more than one brand available of the part you are seeking, and ask them if there is a difference in quality. 

 

Retailers aren't really to blame for selling the lower quality parts, when you see things from their perspective. You see, when Joe Shopper calls around checking prices, a retailer knows he will lose the sale if he can't quote a really competitive price. In truth, retailers often will actually make a little more profit when they sell the better quality parts (with slightly higher prices), since the percentages are often the same. But, too many folks like ol' Joe Shopper just call lots of places and then place their order the lowest price. Retailers are afraid they might lose an entire large order because the price they quoted for a major item like a Camaro hood was higher than their competition. 

 

You can't really blame the manufacturers either. They know that there are some customers who are price-driven, period. Some guys just want to do a "mop-n-glow" job on a car and dump it at a profit. They will only buy the cheapest parts. Other customers want the very best part they can find. So various manufacturers compete in whatever fashion they think will help them to survive and grow. 

 

It is the responsibility of we hobbyists to research and educate ourselves before we buy such reproduction car parts. 

 

 

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Got to share a story with everyone that I think you’ll get a laugh out of. I’ve got a very decent 60’s era low miles car in my front yard that I’m selling. While it’s not rust free it has some small areas of rot in the very bottom of one rear quarter and some pin holes on the door skins. Had a guy stop to look at it and he told me he restored a lot of cars then proceeded to tell me the car was junk claiming the whole rear quarter and the doors needed to be replaced. I immediately questioned why would he want to replace almost perfect OEM doors because of a few pin holes and replace a full quarter when only a small area below the very bottom crease needed a patch welded in.(this car doesn’t have a dent or a ding on it anywhere) He preceded to explain that I didn’t really understand the work involved in restoring a car. So I politely said I felt I did understand and that nothing is as good as an OEM door and repops are not even close. A little tig welding of the pin holes and some light body work was easy compared to all the work required in a aftermarket door. Same thing on the patch. When he continued to say how he’s worked on many cars and there was a ton more work than I thought, he repeated that I just didn’t understand and only some one who’s restored a car would know. 

     So, I told him to follow me into my garage and explained to him that I had a pretty good idea what a restoration entails. I described and showed him the work I do and suddenly he tried to become a little more friendly and admitted he was basically looking to get a deal on the car and that he’s not that skilled in the finer points like welding and installing metal replacement panels. He said that his offer technique often scares the sellers into giving a better price and said “I know you know what I mean if you play with cars”. So it turns out he likes no rust so he can simply switch out components that can be replaced and he has no issue in trying to scam a person possibly out of money they really need. Yes, I like a good price but I’m also ethical about how I go about making an offer, especially with a seller who might not know what they have. He then preceded to show me a few pictures of the cars he’s done and sold. One was a car that his relatives  wanted when he was done but he told them that the car wasn’t for them and admitted that he simply put bondo over the rusted out areas and his restoration was only a “good for 6 months” one! And this guy was telling me I know nothing about restoring a car! As what’s been said, starting with an original car is always the best. 

Edited by chistech (see edit history)
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