GregLaR

Tupelo Museum Closing, Selling Off Cars

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I don't want to see anyone's dream falter and lose money,

but the cars will surely be better off if they are sold to

individuals who will maintain and drive them--and continue

to expose them to the public by taking them to shows.  It is very

likely that most of those cars haven't been driven in 15 to 20

years.

 

Any prospective buyer should investigate the maintenance/

driving records, and bid accordingly.  If the cars have been idle,

they are worth substantially LESS due to the work they will need. 

"Museum car" is not a complimentary term! 

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I think it's positive. Cars in a museum are lifeless and look sort of sad to me. Kind of like the caged animals on display in old fashioned zoos of yester year. Break the "collection" up get as many as possible into the hands of folks who might actually use them and get them out and about..........Bob

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Who knows the J number on the Duesenberg?   Also, what is the double rear spare coachbuilt car with the horrible colors in the background?

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I have been to this museum a few times. It is a neat collection of cars. Lots of obscure stuff. Most of these cars are old originals or very older restorations and have not been used in many, many years. I think several of them were purchased and parked.

 

Alsancle: I believe the Duesenberg  is J-547, but I might be wrong. I don't remember the coach builder. Pretty much a mostly original car with an ancient repaint. Tired for sure, and missing a lot of little bits and pieces, but still a J Duesenberg. Interesting to see a Duesenberg with original and proper painted wheels. 

If you are referring to that pink/purple car, I believe that is a 1932 Nash convertible sedan, probably a 1080. It looks like it has dual rear mounts, but it doesn't. It is a single, rear mount car. Those dual rear tires I believe on on the back of the 1913 Wescott roadster, but, from the photos perspective, look like they are part of the pink/purple Nash.

 

Having worked at a few prominent museums, I agree that museum cars are often the most neglected. They suffer abuse due to their lack of use, care and maintenance.

 

Car Museums=Car Mausoleums.

 

These cars will hopefully be refreshed and returned back to the road.

 

 

 

 

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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Wow, that is one square Model J, and I like it. Such a changeup from the crazy stuff we usually see at the shows. Probably half or more cars with lines like that have been rebodied. I like the simple charm of a Plain Jane Sedan........even if it’s a Duesenberg!

 

After another look, it’s the most visually challenged club sedan I have ever seen.......I like it even more!

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Yes, that's one of the last largely untouched Js out there.  It came from the Ed Weaver auction in the 1990s.   I've kept tabs on it, hoping somehow everyone would forget about it, and then somehow I'd have the money to swoop in and buy it down the road when no one was looking.  Looks like that's not going to happen now.   Guaranteed entry to Pebble, Ed.  I don't think it's ever been in a car show before.  It's not running that I know of either.   Probably hasn't run since the 1980s or earlier.   Looks like it's missing all the trim strips on the running boards and fenders.  I wonder if those are the right door handles or not.  Rollston used 2 different styles.  One style through about 1934, and then a later style.  The earlier style was made out of German SIlver.  The ones on this car are different from both styles.  I hope this car gets the restpration it deserves.  Almost looks like the body was designed to be an open front town car, but they did a solid roof on this one.   I believe there's a picture of it in one of the Duesenberg books from when it was new, and it did have chrome wheels originally.           

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)
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I love touring museums around the country.  there's always a museum or few in the area at the AACA national Meet, not always a car museum, but something worth seeing. I alway plan an extra day to see the local site at these locations. I think it sad when any close.  It is great seeing cars at car shows and  tours.  I believe museums car get seen more than we realize, unless their private. 

Edited by Joe Block (see edit history)

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8 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

Cars in a museum are lifeless and look sort of sad to me. Kind of like the caged animals on display in old fashioned zoos of yester year.

 

When I was only 5 or 6 my parents took me to the zoo. I'm guessing it was the Bronx zoo. I can still remember, in fact it's about the only thing I remember about that visit, a beautiful gorilla. He was in a cage. He was in a cage with a tire. He could nothing all day except stare back at the curious people who stared at him. Just like the beautiful cars in museums that can do nothing except stare back at the curious................Bob

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The three wheeled Knox, 1903 Ford and unrestored White would be my picks, I'm sure there will be more once the catalog comes out. Bob 

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That three wheeled Knox may make me attend that auction........just what I need another useless museum piece that I can’t live without!

 

Went to google and did an image search.I will not be attending. There are lots of “museum” cars, and the Knox is certainly one. Look close at many of the legendary cars on display, lots of them are going to be hard sells.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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7 hours ago, motoringicons said:

If you are referring to that pink/purple car, I believe that is a 1932 Nash convertible sedan, probably a 1080. It looks like it has dual rear mounts, but it doesn't. It is a single, rear mount car. Those dual rear tires I believe on on the back of the 1913 Wescott roadster, but, from the photos perspective, look like they are part of the pink/purple Nash.

 

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Thanks.  There are only 3 or 4 of those Nash's and that is the only one with a rear spare as far as I know.  Love it... except for the color.

 

 

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Could someone please Photoshop that Nash in black & white, consider it a Christmas gift to the world. Merry Christmas! 

 

Bob 

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28 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

Thanks.  There are only 3 or 4 of those Nash's and that is the only one with a rear spare as far as I know.  Love it... except for the color.

 

 

 

They must have been out of barf green at the paint store when they went shopping that day. Sad choice of colors on a very rare and unusual automobile. Imagine what the under hood and rest of the car look like if the people who were restoring it made that color choice. 

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I agree it's better to have the cars well-maintained and brought out to shows and tours than in a museum.  As I see it, the order of preferred antique automotive usage goes like this, from worst (at the top) to best (at the bottom): 

 

1) Poorly maintained and in a collection no one sees.

2) Poorly maintained and in a museum some can see.

3) Well maintained and in a museum or collection some can see.

4) Well maintained and regularly driven.

5) In my garage

 

 

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I hate it when I’m right..........look closely at the door jams, leather, snaps, hood - radiator shell fit, ect..........also note the tires are brand new with no miles.......wonder why?

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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So is that a 1090 with the shorter wheelbase?    I lusted after this one years ago when Richard Bloomquist was selling it.  He wanted some decent coin and that was 15 years ago.

 

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So,  I guess Advanced Eight which is the 1080.   Not quite the Ambassador 1090 but then again I don't know what the differences are besides wheelbase.

 

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