GregLaR

Tupelo Museum Closing, Selling Off Cars

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Yes, that's the photo that's in the one Duesenberg book I was thinking of.   A very handsome car.   I think it looks a little weird in the previous photos because the photos were taken at weird angles and from too close, and the headlights are in a different position now (too high).  Notice the car has the correct Rollston door handles on it here.  And while it does have running board trim (missing now), it does not have the fender trim most early Duesenbergs have.  With the right restoration, I think you could win the Duesenberg class at Pebble.            

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)
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11 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Can we STOP EVERYTHING, is this photo a younger one of the car in Tupelo? If so it changes everything everyone has said up to this point. I might even let the WWW roll. Bob 

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It doesn't change anything I have said Bob.  😄

 

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So that is the same car? If so she didn't age gracefully, or the current photos were taken at poor angles. Bob 

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12 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Can we STOP EVERYTHING, is this photo a younger one of the car in Tupelo? If so it changes everything everyone has said up to this point. I might even let the WWW roll. Bob 

untitled.png

A really good looking car !!!  I particularly like that it has a slightly wider body than the norm and how they sat it down over the frame - ie it has a more shallow splash apron - less space between the bottom of the doors and the running boards (my 1932 RR PI did the same thing and made a huge difference as to looks - especially with the car that is rather large to begin with). And metal sidemount tire covers really do make a difference as well.   And, you can even get reproduction Firestone tires to match the photograph.  Yes, you can restore (or at least 3/4 restore - perhaps the interior is nice enough to leave original) and should be able to make it to the lawn of Pebble Beach Concours too. 

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On 12/25/2018 at 11:27 AM, 1937hd45 said:

If the Amish had Classics...……..

thumbnail_1.thumb.jpg.736454c237da276f7f01094417335fbd.jpg

 

A minor point. The Amish do not drive cars at all. What you meant to say was ""If a small Mennonite sect known locally as "the black bumper boys" had Classics""... This sect drives but all chrome on their cars is painted black and of course white walls are a no go.

 

 

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34 minutes ago, Restorer32 said:

 

A minor point. The Amish do not drive cars at all. What you meant to say was ""If a small Mennonite sect known locally as "the black bumper boys" had Classics""... This sect drives but all chrome on their cars is painted black and of course white walls are a no go.

 

 

Leno could have pulled that off, I'll leave standup to the pros, sorry it bothered you. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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On 12/25/2018 at 11:27 AM, 1937hd45 said:

If the Amish had Classics...……..

thumbnail_1.thumb.jpg.736454c237da276f7f01094417335fbd.jpg

 

A minor point. The Amish do not drive cars at all. What you meant to say was ""If a small Mennonite sect known locally as "the black bumper boys" had Classics""... This sect drives but all chrome on their cars is painted black and of course white walls are a no go.

 

Didn't bother me. The spirit of your remark was right on. Ironically we use an Amish foundry to cast all the auto castings we make.  Actually they show some interest in old cars. They just don't drive them.

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On ‎12‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 10:14 PM, alsancle said:

So is that a 1090 with the shorter wheelbase?    I lusted after this one years ago when Richard Bloomquist was selling it.  He wanted some decent coin and that was 15 years ago.

 

image.png.e6c44792953154acedcdff63ef3bd205.png

I have a 1933 in my shop now making some repairs for Walter Miller, Syracuse NY .Its the big and a super looking car. Very close quarters in the back, lots of leg room in the front.

1932 nash ambasador 001.JPG

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2 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

 

A minor point. The Amish do not drive cars at all. What you meant to say was ""If a small Mennonite sect known locally as "the black bumper boys" had Classics""... This sect drives but all chrome on their cars is painted black and of course white walls are a no go.

 

Didn't bother me. The spirit of your remark was right on. Ironically we use an Amish foundry to cast all the auto castings we make.  Actually they show some interest in old cars. They just don't drive them.

Mr King has a Model A hidden in the barn at Cattail....

 

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Really? I'll have to ask next time I'm over there. I know he's big into antique farm equip and they still use a Frick steam engine on the farm.

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I saw a model a IRON WHEELED  doodlebug. I believe it was Emanuel I met with.  They are the most wonderful people to deal with...

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On 12/26/2018 at 7:05 PM, 1935Packard said:

 

Really interesting discussion.  This may be an unanswerable question, but does anyone have any thoughts on what kind of collector is likely to be most interested in this kind of car?  Wondering if there are collectors with several Duesenbergs who might want one more to add to their collection. Or maybe there are collectors who always wanted a Duesenberg who are likely to see this as a relatively inexpensive way in?    I have no idea what the Duesenberg market is like for that kind of car, but it's interesting just to ponder (especially because mere pondering is free).  :)

 

What kind of collector? That’s a hard one to define. The other restored car looks well done, has no stories, and is turn key. This one is a rather frumpy, shop worn car, with some known issues. I think the future owners would be one of two choices. Someone looking for the lowest cost possible Model J they can get into, or someone who is looking to take on a J restoration and roll it out at Pebble and Auburn, looking to score a trophy. I like closed cars, but reality on today’s show fields means the chance of a car like this in perfect 100 point condition may only make a seconed or third in class.......the water is very deep in the Duesenberg circles at the major shows, and often some really over the top cars park next to the “run of the mill” Duesenbergs making them hard to compete with. Yes, there is such a thing as your average run of the mill Model J.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I was going to discuss the Corvair convertible and Graham sedan in the auction. Never Mind! I’vebeen Outmoneyed....😁

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1 hour ago, Frank DuVal said:

I was going to discuss the Corvair convertible and Graham sedan in the auction. Never Mind! I’vebeen Outmoneyed....😁

 

It's interesting that so many of our forum-goers

are well-versed in Duesenberg history;  but I'd like

to hear about the other cars as well.  Cars that are

affordable have a closer connection to most of us.

 

So go ahead, Frank!

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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10 hours ago, mikewest said:

I saw a model a IRON WHEELED  doodlebug. I believe it was Emanuel I met with.  They are the most wonderful people to deal with...

 

They sure are. When Obamacare was passed they were very concerned that the Amish would be included. I did a bit of research and assured them that the Amish were specifically excluded. We were honored to have been invited to dinner with them some years back. They not only talk the talk they walk the walk.

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10 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

It's interesting that so many of our forum-goers

are well-versed in Duesenberg history;  but I'd like

to hear about the other cars as well.  Cars that are

affordable have a closer connection to most of us.

 

So go ahead, Frank!

The Duesenberg knowledge comes from a couple of us participating having been doing this since we were kids (whether our own interest or such as our parent's/grandparents/relatives/neighbors interests) and/or these things being in and out of the garage on a regular basis (example:  a couple of us around Cincinnati make house calls to keep friend's cars running).  Auburn, Cord, and Duesenberg products while not easy cars to restore or maintain are actually very driveable by today's standards and the Club is great too.  When I joined CCCA in 1989 (I wanted my own memberships so I could read the publications while in law school), it was a joke that there were 30 of us under the age 30, then it became 40 of us under the age 40, then 50 of us under age 50, and now it nearly that same 50 that are in 50's, but when I go to an ACD meet I am very much at home and far from the youngest or oldest (and we have a blast of a time).   By the way, the ACD Club members comes in all forms of income level too.

 

As to other cars in the Tupelo Museum collection - please start discussing as there is some interesting stuff parked there. 

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20 hours ago, mikewest said:

I have a 1933 in my shop now making some repairs for Walter Miller, Syracuse NY .Its the big and a super looking car. Very close quarters in the back, lots of leg room in the front.

 

I always thought the Lester car was the only known "33"?   I guess there are a couple.  Are there any differences between 32 & 33?

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9 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

The Duesenberg knowledge comes from a couple of us participating having been doing this since we were kids

 

I'm a neophyte in the J world because I can only quote a few cars by their "J" number (which is inexact since that was the engine #).   If you throw any J number out to someone like Randy Emma or Chris Summers they will give you an ownership history back to the 40s.   Fred Roe could do that too and there is probably a few more guys (like Chris Charlton, Brian Joseph, Jonathan Sierakowski, etc)  who know more than the rest of the world, combined. 

 

Now,  I can talk Hollywood Graham or Reo Royale until I'm blue in the face.   Those cars are a little more "affordable".

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, alsancle said:

 

I always thought the Lester car was the only known "33"?   I guess there are a couple.  Are there any differences between 32 & 33?

I dont know.  Ive never seen another in the flesh.

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54 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

I'm a neophyte in the J world because I can only quote a few cars by their "J" number (which is inexact since that was the engine #).   If you throw any J number out to someone like Randy Emma or Chris Summers they will give you an ownership history back to the 40s.   Fred Roe could do that too and there is probably a few more guys (like Chris Charlton, Brian Joseph, Jonathan Sierakowski, etc)  who know more than the rest of the world, combined. 

 

Now,  I can talk Hollywood Graham or Reo Royale until I'm blue in the face.   Those cars are a little more "affordable".

Randy Ema said to me something like he has three more J's on his bucket list that he knows survive and yet has not seen in person (aka impressive the number he has seen in person,matched to having his hands on, and all the research) - An incredible knowledge bank of a guy.  

 

I think your list covers most of the key knowledge banks. 

 

Sidenote: I was given one of those J tracking "books" (in about 2004 or so) that the fellow was doing I think from the 40's through the 90's - amazing he followed so many cars (have not seen it in eons, but it is probably sitting in plain sight on a bookshelf at home). 

 

Add'l sidenote:  I talk mainly 850, 851, and 852 Auburn's these days, plus a variety of other Auburn's and Cords, a host of Cadillac's + being particularly strong with 28-48 Cadillac's, 30's Franklin's, RR-PI Springfield's, a host of Packards, a host of 50's & 60's American & European cars (including sports cars), and .... Basically, I think you will find though I have an appreciation for most everything ever made too. 

 

I did not know you were interested in Hollywood Grahams. 

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I think everyone here finds most pre war that is stock worth while reading about regardless of the subject matter. I enjoy my 15 T as much as the big mulri cylinder stuff.  

 

Back 30 years ago when I was just a college kid Randy opened his shop up to me and spent several hours showing me around, an act of kindness I am forever great-full for. He made time for an east coast guy with no expectations of any benefit for himself. A true ambassador for the hobby. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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42 minutes ago, edinmass said:

I think everyone here finds most pre war that is stock worth while reading about regardless of the subject matter. I enjoy my 15 T as much as the big mulri cylinder stuff.  

 

Back 30 years ago when I was just a college kid Randy opened his shop up to me and spent several hours showing me around, an act of kindness I am forever great-full for. He made time for an east coast guy with no expectations of any benefit for himself. A true ambassador for the hobby. 

I think garage tours, putting people behind the wheel, and time like what Randy did really make the difference - I can recall every single person who has spent time like that with me - great stuff!!! 

 

By the way, I do have very diverse taste, but it was Gene Perkins that sat down with me one day and said something to the jist of "I know you like all kinds of cars and I do too, though not many people your age doing the CCCA stuff and it would be really great if you stick with it and ..." 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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