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Mounted tires on 1922 Buick Rims today


Mark Kikta
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2 hours ago, Mark Kikta said:

This was a good day.  My first attempt at mounting tires on my 1922 rims was successful.  Of course I solicited some help from my wife, but we got it done.

 

I love this post.  A win-win-win!

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Fr. Buick,  Well We did this in the basement because it was too cold outside.  They were pretty stiff  for sure.

 

Tinindian,  next time I will have two tire Irons and it will be easier.  It worked with one but two would be easier.

 

Morgan,   Why do you wait to fully inflate on the car?  Rim fexibility?

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And when you mount the rims onto the wheels, be careful that the paint might prevent the rims from fully seating on the felloes.  Use a rubber mallet to seat the rims fully, and don't tighten the lug nuts too much as the bolts are soft steel.  The original lug wrenches on these cars were only about 4 or 5 inches long, so use far less torque than on demountable wheels.  I put a reference (piece of 4x4 lumber or tool box) on the ground lengthwise (paralleling the car) and slowly rotate the wheel to check for runout.  If any portion of the installed rim comes closer to the reference point than the others, the lug nuts on either side of that "high point" need to tightened a bit.

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2 hours ago, Brian_Heil said:

Did you apply talc powder to the tube, flap, and tire?

I have done this and have since wondered about the wisdom of it. The talc never goes away. I used talc after noting that the soapy water I used never went away, so the rim was always wet under the tire combination.

 

My thinking now is that the tube, flap and tire are now fully lubricated with talc and can move around. For the tire, that is probably not good as under braking, they can rotate on the rim, reducing braking effort. As well, they may rotate the tube, which will pull the valve out of the tube.

 

What do you all think about this?

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My take is that the primary function of the talc is as dry lube to prevent heat-bonding of a portion of the tube to the casing/carcass--bonding might well cause a tear in the tube.  For those in the USA, please note that baby powder no longer contains talc, only cornstarch.  But NAPA stores carry "tire talc."

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I used soapy water around the edges of the tire because that’s what I used working in a gas station for years.  I also used tire talc so I got lucky there.  I got the reducer nut from Lucas Tire but wasn’t sure if I needed the brass dust cover.  Guess I should get them too.

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Great advice on checking the runout and adjustments.  I wasn’t sure how to tackle that.  I think I’ll take a look at the bearings before I put these back on.  I’ll at least check out the front ones because I hear a clicking noise when I rotate them.  

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3 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

I have done this and have since wondered about the wisdom of it. The talc never goes away. I used talc after noting that the soapy water I used never went away, so the rim was always wet under the tire combination.

 

My thinking now is that the tube, flap and tire are now fully lubricated with talc and can move around. For the tire, that is probably not good as under braking, they can rotate on the rim, reducing braking effort. As well, they may rotate the tube, which will pull the valve out of the tube.

 

What do you all think about this?

 

I believe that is one of the reasons that you need to keep the tire pressures high, like 60psi to be sure the tire does not move on the rim.

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18 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

 

Just what the old timers tell you, people have been killed by inflating split rim tires off the car.

The only type of rims that are potential killers are the two or three piece rims. The reason many shops will not mount tires on our "split" rims is because the two and three piece rims have been mislabeled as "split" rather than "two" or "three" piece for too many years.  Even those rims are totally safe to work on if you have a cage.

Just like "back fire" and "after fire".  One could set your car on fire and the other might blow your muffler apart and yet many people refer to either as a back fire"

Misuse of a name and misinformation are the bane of civilization.

Edited by Guest (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

I thought backfire was when you are hand cranking a car and a cylinder fires before that cylinder's piston reaches TDC, making the engine go "back" in the wrong direction.

The term for what you have described is kickback, it'll break a wrist or arm.

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1 hour ago, JFranklin said:

The term for what you have described is kickback, it'll break a wrist or arm.

This just proves my point.

 

Have a Merry Christmas.

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3 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

 

I wonder if this makes sense:

 

1. Explosion before TDC but after intake valve closes = kickback

2. Explosion before TDC and before intake valve closes = backfire

 

Talking about hand cranking

I believe any fire where it is not properly directed is considered a backfire. An ignition that is too soon causes a kickback. You can have either without the other occurring.

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Talc.  My opinion is it helps the tube and flap get to where they need to seat at assembly and to reduce friction as the tube and tire flex as they rotate.

 

I do my best to keep it off the tire bead and rim.

 

 

Mounting tires.  First time I did it was with two large Craftsman screwdrivers.  Worst car experience ever.  Like wrestling hogs.

 

Typing on my new retirement laptop I just opened!  Thank you Wifie!

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2 hours ago, JFranklin said:

I believe any fire where it is not properly directed is considered a backfire. An ignition that is too soon causes a kickback. You can have either without the other occurring.

 

 

If the intake valve is still open, I don't believe there will be a kickback. The energy will go out the valve, BOOM!

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