1935Packard

"Millennials Invade Classic Car Market"

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Notice how so many of our forum-goers

pigeon-hole themselves into the categories that

the marketers have set!  Marketers MAKE UP a label

and people are quick to call themselves X, Y, Millennials.

 

Folks, you go far above and beyond those labels!

Does anyone think that the Generation X musician-artist

in Soho in New York City;  the family farmer in Nebraska;

the studied Certified Public Accountant in a Chicago suburb;

and the man away for a week working in the oilfields of Alaska,

are all similar because they were born in a certain range of years?

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6 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Notice how so many of our forum-goers

pigeon-hole themselves into the categories that

the marketers have set!  Marketers MAKE UP a label

and people are quick to call themselves X, Y, Millennials.

 

Folks, you go far above and beyond those labels!

Does anyone think that the Generation X musician-artist

in Soho in New York City;  the family farmer in Nebraska;

the studied Certified Public Accountant in a Chicago suburb;

and the man away for a week working in the oilfields of Alaska,

are all similar because they were born in a certain range of years?

 

This may be straying a bit the subject of the thread, but I'll bite: I think the answer is often "yes."  Different generations were shaped by different experiences, world events, and technologies at different stages of their lives, and often that does create a shared outlook for many.  It creates a useful heuristic, at least.  And I think that is the conclusion not just of "marketers,"  but of professional demographers and researchers who conduct studies to identify changing attitudes across different generations.  See, for example, The National Science Foundation's Longitudinal Study of American Youth and its journal, the "Generation X Report."    

  

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12 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Notice how so many of our forum-goers

pigeon-hole themselves into the categories that

the marketers have set!  Marketers MAKE UP a label

and people are quick to call themselves X, Y, Millennials.

 

Folks, you go far above and beyond those labels!

Does anyone think that the Generation X musician-artist

in Soho in New York City;  the family farmer in Nebraska;

the studied Certified Public Accountant in a Chicago suburb;

and the man away for a week working in the oilfields of Alaska,

are all similar because they were born in a certain range of years?

 

Sorry to disappoint you John, but marketers didn't come up with the generational titles and they don't really use them. It's more of a sociological designation, so you've got a bit of a strawman here. Marketers focus more on lifestyle, a thing called psychographics. 

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I am lucky to live in a fairly temperate climate and live in an area where there are two informal car / breakfast groups that meet every Saturday as well as numerous car shows throughout the year. I take my cars out to drive at least weekly weather permitting and I go to these informal events a couple times a month. I always run into people interested in my car and I am always interested in their cars. While most are older there are quite a few from generations X and Y as well as even younger. Their questions are almost always positive and when I was driving prewar cars they were usually fascinated and eager for information since you almost never see such cars on the street. I go out of my way to ask the younger participants about their cars, hot rods or trucks and they are just as eager to share what they have done as we are. I really don't see any problem with the old car hobby continuing on.

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I'm now going to get "Classic Car" insurance with Hagerty, which is what this article was based on: requests for insurance quotes and valuations on "Classics." I was only alerted to this option through this forum. It's a much better value, more coverage, and a different type of coverage, than if I were to add it to my regular insurance. I am surprised that you can just declare the value. Hagerty obviously must recognize it won't be driven much. My regular insurance would let me specify 1,000 miles per year use minimum, but based on their pricing they seem to figure i would still be driving it every day and likely to get in a collision.

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1 hour ago, mike6024 said:

I am surprised that you can just declare the value. Hagerty obviously must recognize it won't be driven much. My regular insurance would let me specify 1,000 miles per year use minimum, but based on their pricing they seem to figure i would still be driving it every day and likely to get in a collision.

 

Mike, collector-car insurance is a good value!

For exactly the reason you mention:  owners drive

their cars infrequently, and take good care of them.

You may pay $75 or $100 per year for the typical antique.

 

Regular insurance companies don't really know how to

deal with antique cars.  If the owner has an accident,

such companies, I've read, don't understand the 

care and expense of doing work properly.  Further, they

might see your beloved classic as just an old car which

they will depreciate, and they may give you far, far less

money than is actually needed to do proper repairs.

 

When you "declare" the value, Hagerty has to agree with

your value.  I don't think your proposed valuation could

be away off and still be agreed upon!  

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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At 38 I don't classify myself in any "group" as I would just like to live my life and have the govt leave me alone.  This mindset doesn't seem to match any label.  I have owned a few cars that most consider old though.

1922 Model T Speedster (Finished driven High School senior year)

1928 Model A Roadster

1959 Ford Thunderbird (current driver)

1964 Ford F100 (High School car)

1964 Triumph Spitfire (daily driver)

1966 Pontiac Bonneville (daily driver, used as a tow car cross country)

1977 Ford Granada (College tow car for the Speedster)

 

Currently I am building a 1927 Model T Speedster and collecting pieces for my personal design 1912 Tourabout.

 

 

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frf.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Going back to this topic, Hagerty's new "Insider" magazine -- seems sort of like a Keith Martin's Sports Car Market, but based heavily on Hagerty's own database of trends -- has this interesting piece of information:

 

  • "While Baby Boomers tend to have cars that are on average 14 years younger than they are, millennials tend to own cars that are on average seven years older than them. Among Hagerty policy-holders, the median model year for Pre-Boomers is 1964, Boomers 1968, Gen-X 1970, and millennials 1970."

 

According to the story, the kinds of collectors cars that the young and the old tend to own  -- at least among those insured by Hagerty -- aren't all that different.  One exception is that the pre-Boomers born before 1946 are much more into 1930s and 1940s cars, and much less into 1970s and later cars, than later generations.

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)

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On 12/31/2018 at 2:10 PM, babychadwick said:

At 38 I don't classify myself in any "group" as I would just like to live my life and have the govt leave me alone.  This mindset doesn't seem to match any label.  I have owned a few cars that most consider old though.

1922 Model T Speedster (Finished driven High School senior year)

1928 Model A Roadster

1959 Ford Thunderbird (current driver)

1964 Ford F100 (High School car)

1964 Triumph Spitfire (daily driver)

1966 Pontiac Bonneville (daily driver, used as a tow car cross country)

1977 Ford Granada (College tow car for the Speedster)

 

Currently I am building a 1927 Model T Speedster and collecting pieces for my personal design 1912 Tourabout.

 

I think it is cool you drove a speedster in HS.  For me, graduating in 82 it was all about musclecars and there was a pecking order.  If I could have got my hands on a Hemi I would have ruled my school, but had to get along drivng a 49 Special Deluxe.

 

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7 hours ago, 1935Packard said:

 

  • "While Baby Boomers tend to have cars that are on average 14 years younger than they are, millennials tend to own cars that are on average seven years older than them. Among Hagerty policy-holders, the median model year for Pre-Boomers is 1964, Boomers 1968, Gen-X 1970, and millennials 1970."

 

Without causing too much of a ruckus,  this makes sense.   I see all prewar cars as cool,  most 1946 to 1964 cars as cool,  many 1964 to 1972 cars as cool, and very few 1973 to present cars.

 

As a Millennial, most of the cool cars are older than you are.

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 6:46 PM, Pomeroy41144 said:

 

 

If you were born between 1946 and 1964, you are a baby boomer.  

 

Apparently, I'm a baby boomer and I just thought I was an old git!

 

Locally, youngsters seem to rather like my 1989 BMW E30 325i touring, and don't seem that interested in my Pre WWI and Pre WW2, vintage and veteran cars.

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    Just barely a Baby Boomer... missed out on the giant pile of cash/equity for just for owning a home from 1960 till 2000.   To me the real difference in these groups is disposable income.  The most I have ever paid for a collector car is $3K, just broke my rule last year spent and spent 4K on one.  My cars are always cash, or I do not buy them, keeps it fun.  I hope we (collectors) young and old keep buying collector cars because we have a passion for whatever the make or year.  My 19 year old could care less, he just loves driving them, my cars are 1928, 1929, 1931, 1933, 1964, 1972, 1974, 1977, and 1982 plus a few that are not running right now.  He loves the trucks but every year he want to get my 1929 Graham-Paige 827 out for a drive, he started driving that car when he was 15, it still is his favorite.  I guess what I am saying is without a cash entrance fee, the selection might be different?

    

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A baby boomer here that still thinks for cars to be "Old Cars"  or "Antiques", they have to be older than me.

I have zero interest in vehicles from my high school years, but my Grandparents era cars are the most interesting,

they were old people and could even be called antique.

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We all turn (turned) antique at 25 right?

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On 1/8/2019 at 1:24 PM, JACK M said:

We all turn (turned) antique at 25 right?

     By that standard, any super market in Florida has a antique car show going on in the parking lot everyday, with museum quality drivers.

     I'd be more inclined to say 1957 vehicles become antiques this year.  62 years of age is the earliest age for retirement & social security.579302964_1957Ranchero.thumb.jpg.8f30106fb8c153b30dd5ce097cc2e052.jpg

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Its not just Florida Paul.

Since it is not uncommon for cars of today to run for hundreds of thousands of miles the definition of 'antique' is skewed.

Back in the day a 25 year old car was considered used up, especially if it had turned the ODO over, they were indeed antique.

But times and technology has us so accelerated that we are all mixed up about the term.

Now a five year old computer is an antique and 60 is the new 40.

Go figure.

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On 12/19/2018 at 10:27 AM, Joe in Canada said:

Well early this morning I am a grandfather today again and its a boy. When the ladies had a baby shower I sent along a gift all wrapped up consisting of vice grips and channel lock pliers that I bought at Hershey this year. The ladies got a chuckle out of it but you have to start them early. I will be out shopping for a toy antique car this afternoon.

You will have much more fun that he does with cars. My 9 year old Grandson likes to come over and help Papa work on the old cars. He has even picked out which one is "his' when the time comes I don't need them any more. I have more fun with him than you can imagine.

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Is there a classification for "eccentric gearhead" ?

 

ps I still have my first luggable from 1983 and it boots. (Phone has more smarts but still...)

 

pps my first car had a 3.4 liter DOHC-6 & 4 wheel disks and my latest has a 3.6 liter DOHC-6 and 4 wheel disks. I have a 30 year old car with a factory touchscreen in the dash. Am not sure which way I am going.

 

ppps I wasn't born between 1946 and 1964.

Edited by padgett (see edit history)

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I am 19 I bought my first car a 1926 Dodge at the ripe old age of 14. I drove it daily to school. Halfway was a dirt road. 

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That is one of my all-time very favorite pictures here. If your cooling system is in good shape, you can and should blank off around 1/2 (experiment), of your radiator in temperatures that cold. Be particularly observant of engine temp when pulling grades. Do you have any kind of heater ?    -   Carl 

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Fun fact if you look closely you can see the hood is open that’s because coming up a hill the engine overheated. I can not remember if this picture was before or after I replaced the water pump. I have a backseat exhaust heater but not installed. I usually use a blanket and a heavy winter coat. My floorboard is not original and is two plywood pieces spit vertically. I take the passenger side out and the heat from the engine blows in the cabin after a while it gets warm and I have to open a window. I have a squeegee to defog the windshield. I bought a winter front at a flea market but it was not the right size. I also bought a couple of period correct windshield defrosters. 

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My daughter and her husband are in that age bracket but aren’t destined to show anything nor especially “tour” with a group. They like the older RED Mustangs, Camaros, Challengers only done as restomodes. They also like the 60-62 Corvette but have ruled that out for now because can’t carry the kids and doggie for an ice cream cone in the evening   I believe their friends in the area are the same except don’t forget this age group is big on the modern electric cars. Oh they have no interest in my show only muscle cars!!

Robert

Edited by Robert Street (see edit history)

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I am 18 and just bought a 1950 Plymouth. Don't get me wrong I would love a muscle car or even a 71 c10 but right now those cars are worth a lot even if they are in bad shape, so for me a 1950 was actually a more accessible way of getting a cool old car I can actually take to shows, yes its a lot or work but people want double what I paid for rusted out muscle cars, thats my reason, just thought i would share.

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