Jump to content

Then and now: where did these prewar cars go?


Recommended Posts

Regal Underslungs were a subject earlier in the thread...

 

Here's one which made it to Australia, possibly an English production or maybe Canadian (I seem to recall reading they were made in all three countries):

 

0219alfordregal.thumb.jpg.a216fc48af3755fdd7c15a352f6cfeab.jpg

 

The Alford family of Hughenden, Queensland, purchased this when it was about twelve years old. They used it for a further eight or ten years, this photo being from when they moved to Longreach and one of the sons entertained young ladies with whom he played tennis.

 

Then the transmission (one of those ugly 'built into the back axle' items) got sick of bounding up and down on the rough roads at the end of its torque tube and became unrepairable. Enter Herb Avery, who was looking for something with which he could beat his brother's 30/98 when they went out and raced on the claypans near Longreach. He altered the rear springing so it located the rear axle (see pic) and did away with the torque tube, installing the running gear from an Austin 20...

 

0219regalchassis.thumb.jpg.2e797d11264b9539b4b39aca1f887477.jpg

 

Avery built an alloy body for it...

 

Averyin.jpg.a5a997e6f6defe547648c965a5c33571.jpg

 

Later it was bought by coach operator, Rex Law, who raced it. Soon the old four-cylinder engine was replaced by a six... ...Reglbg6.jpg.6a34b007fad6f0eaacd201756ed4fe83.jpg

 

...then a Cadillac V8 went into it. It became a very potent machine in the motor racing world of Australia during the late forties and very early fifties, actually holding the outright lap record at Lowood circuit for a time. Obviously changes were being made along the way.

 

Where is it now? That's the theme of this thread... well, Law's son recalls it being dismantled (the engine used in it did weekday service in a coach, weekends in the race car!) and the chassis being left under the house. Sad circumstances led to Law being bankrupted and the house being sold in the late fifties.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Closer, I think. I'm going on 35-year-old memories at this point, but I really remember it being so much lower and sleeker than our frumpy '25 Buick and with wider tires than those shown above. It was past the "spindly" look that so many '20s cars had with those skinny tires. However, I also know it wasn't as sleek-looking as Bob Jensen's 1928 443 phaeton with dual rear spares (now in the late Bill Snyder's collection). It wasn't quite this new, although I've always been madly in love with this red car, too:

 

812NOgflvyL.jpg

 

Maybe I'm remembering it wrong, but I just recall being so much more impressed with that long, low gray phaeton than almost anything else on those tours.

 

I took this photo at the 2016 Grand Classic in Salem, OH, and I think this is pretty close to how it looked, although this is definitely not the car. I note that the top matches the one above, so perhaps I was mistaken in how "chopped" it looked relative to some of the others. Memory is funny that way...

 

GC7.thumb.jpg.8f35af9894f577d9c78a2ca4f9ee9b02.jpg

Matt:

 Hay... remember, I have one of those "frumpy" 1925 Buicks. Hopefully after I am done with it I will be making it less "frumpy"!

Here is another long Gray Packard of the vintage being discussed.

DSCF1242.thumb.JPG.a5049a79501a6726304631d53f699626.JPG

 On display at The Northeast Classic Car Museum in NY.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad's been into antique cars since his teens in the early '50s.  My mom has never been that interested.  In all those years, she admitted to liking one old car - this one.
Packard1928_Yeska.thumb.jpg.a56573caacb70fda911e6126c1daa8cf.jpg

Henry Yeska owned it at the time this photo appeared on the back cover of the Antique Automobile, 1973 #1.  It's one of the most beautiful cars I've ever seen.  Somehow the Packard stylists took the contemporary cues and synthesized something very special.

 

(I don't mean to drag the thread away from old photo detective work - sorry.)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Just came across this 1947 VMCCA program, lots of photos and owner info on many cars that were in the 1938 movie. Bob 

DSCF9843.JPG

 

 

Couldn't resist adding this.  A few years later, a bunch of guys thought it would be fun to recreate this Peter Helck painting in real life.

1953-14-3_BH_Helck_setup.thumb.jpg.ad1724ec58ee5e89021b459c4776cec8.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I took this photo at the 2016 Grand Classic in Salem, OH, and I think this is pretty close to how it looked, although this is definitely not the car. I note that the top matches the one above, so perhaps I was mistaken in how "chopped" it looked relative to some of the others. Memory is funny that way...

 

GC7.thumb.jpg.8f35af9894f577d9c78a2ca4f9ee9b02.jpg

 

We might not ever nail the exact one you saw, but we'll have fun trying!  This one you saw in Ohio was in one ownership in the Boston area for 50+ years, so I doubt this was on the Michigan tour you mention.  Like the car in the first photo I posted after you described what you saw,  this is a sport model, which was indeed more sleek that the phaeton.  Bodies were made by Pullman, and the eight cylinder sport model was only available in the first and second series (1-36 and 2-36).  To make things more challenging in your quest, Dustproof Grey was a common color scheme on those early 8's.  I have photos of other cars that match your description but with different upholstery.  To keep with the then and now theme, here's a "then" photo of the same car, taken in DC in 1945.

209792 U.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Erska, I think this car from the group of photos you posted a few days ago, was Art Austria's 1913 Simplex, a car that has a slightly different look now and has been shown at Pebble Beach in the not too distant past. I'm not doing well identifying any other from the group, but maybe someone will chime in.

54517726_carshowphotoslarry3.thumb.jpg.bb1a1cfb492def30004408b4c1f4ffcf (2).jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, twin6 said:

Erska, I think this car from the group of photos you posted a few days ago, was Art Austria's 1913 Simplex, a car that has a slightly different look now and has been shown at Pebble Beach in the not too distant past. I'm not doing well identifying any other from the group, but maybe someone will chime in.

54517726_carshowphotoslarry3.thumb.jpg.bb1a1cfb492def30004408b4c1f4ffcf (2).jpg

 

I'm glad to know some of these cars photographed in the '50s still exist and are known in AACA.  If any of their current owners would like a high resolution scan of their car's old photo, please send me a private message through the forum system.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Erska said:

 

If any of their current owners would like a high resolution scan of their car's old photo, please send me a private message through the forum system.

Thank you for offering this service.  I know many who like to have a detailed historical record of their vehicle, including old show photographs of it from earlier years.

 

Craig

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/5/2019 at 10:58 PM, StanleyRegister said:

 

Couldn't resist adding this.  A few years later, a bunch of guys thought it would be fun to recreate this Peter Helck painting in real life.

1953-14-3_BH_Helck_setup.thumb.jpg.ad1724ec58ee5e89021b459c4776cec8.jpg

 

Clarence Huggins, with his back to the camera, was a larger than life character who had a Pope Hartford for at least 20 years, that he toured in frequently.  Not sure where exactly this ended up, but I believe it's on the west coast somewhere.  Clarence was a very dedicated member of the Profile Automobile League in NH (the PAL's),  never camera shy, and always up for a gag.  Here's an example from the club's magazine "Splash Pan."

1949.jpg

Huggins.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Craig:

 Thank you for the comment. I know of many who would like the same. I also know of those who could care less about documenting of their cars past. Several of our local upholstery shops in Chambersburg did work on many antiques in the 1950s and 60s. They kept "Brag Books" to show potential customers what their skill were on other cars. Before, during and after photos. I had seen some of them in the 1980s. The place that did the top on my 1925 Master touring car had one of those books. They threw it away when the owner retired.

 The family I bought my 1925 Master from did not have one photo of the car before, during or after it was "fixed up". Also, they had the car for over 50 years!  Many times the only photo documentation we have of cars are those taken by spectators at meets and car shows.

 I would love to have a few photos of my 1925s in their former lives. When I first bought my 1925 Standard in 2011, I made a plea on the forum if anyone knew any back round on my car. I posted all the photos of the car I had in hopes of someone recognizing it.

 I was told by the former owner that he bought it from either Wisconsin or Minnesota. (I would have remembered) That would have been around 2000 or 2001. So far no leads.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is another classic Packard from mid-1950s Los Angeles.  The story I was told is that my father owned this dual-cowl phaeton in original condition, then sold it to someone who restored it.  The photos are after the restoration.  Is it a 1932 model?  An eight?  Still around?  

packard phaeton.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

No - car should look the same unless it has been restored in the last year 

Unless it was restored in the past year, this should be the late B.C. Hartline, Late Jim Schneck  car, and I do not know when it was done, but only J Duesnebery I have seen where everything aluminum under hood is engine turned. download.jpg.d3943b839169abe5f0626ca376612482.jpg

(engine J-525, chassis 2555)  supercharged Duesenberg Model SJ  Brunn Riviera Convertible Torpedo Sedan

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 4:55 PM, Erska said:

Here is another classic Packard from mid-1950s Los Angeles.  The story I was told is that my father owned this dual-cowl phaeton in original condition, then sold it to someone who restored it.  The photos are after the restoration.  Is it a 1932 model?  An eight?  Still around? 

 

Yes, a 1932 model 903 DeLuxe Eight sport phaeton.  I'm sure it's still around, but do not know where it is today.  Thanks for sharing some great photos!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2019 at 5:57 PM, John_Mereness said:

Unless it was restored in the past year, this should be the late B.C. Hartline, Late Jim Schneck  car, and I do not know when it was done, but only J Duesnebery I have seen where everything aluminum under hood is engine turned. download.jpg.d3943b839169abe5f0626ca376612482.jpg

(engine J-525, chassis 2555)  supercharged Duesenberg Model SJ  Brunn Riviera Convertible Torpedo Sedan

 

John, you are correct. The car when I saw it last year was what we would call a well maintained original, has the look of a ten year old well used car. I wouldn’t change a thing! Great car and a great family. I believe Jim’s son is the current caretaker.  

 

Interestingly, we were discussing this car yesterday at dinner and this morning at breakfast. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Ed, Is there something special about the top on this Duesenberg? It looks like is folds up nicely and is totally hidden. Bob 

If its the Duesenberg I'm thinking of, the rear has a hinged cast aluminum clamshell which neatly conceals the top when it is lowered.

 

Craig

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the whole rear of the body tilts back and the top folds under it.   Brunn called it a Riviera phaeton.   Three were built I believe, and all three exist.  The tan car pictured above was originally black, and was a staple at early Northern & Central Ohio AACA, VMCCA, and CCCA events in the 1950's & 60's.   BC Hartline painted it tan in the 50's sometime, and he used to drive the hell out of it too.   It was not a trailer queen.   It still had the original brown leather interior in it last time I saw it.       

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2019 at 11:11 AM, edinmass said:

 

John, you are correct. The car when I saw it last year was what we would call a well maintained original, has the look of a ten year old well used car. I wouldn’t change a thing! Great car and a great family. I believe Jim’s son is the current caretaker.  

 

Interestingly, we were discussing this car yesterday at dinner and this morning at breakfast. 

Good to hear it is the same as just not anybody should ever restore it (takes a "right" person).  First Duesenberg that I ever really "experienced" on the road (as in Jim drove it like a real car) - we did probably 85mph for 15 or so blocks though Auburn, IN one midnight. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This photo was taken on Feb. 20, 1949, at an old car gathering in Florida.  It's a beautiful print - if you could send me a good scan, I'd really appreciate it.  Best I have is this grainy shot, taken at almost exactly the same time.

1949_gathering2.jpg.a689c14c3f030218e55214b5bffbe6c9.jpg

The two Stanleys, at least, are still in the same place.  The condensing car has been in the family since new.  The non-condenser has the curious "upgrade" of Ford wire wheels.

1949_gathering.jpg.77803e90d5d4859ea7f980b1ce90b3dd.jpg

Melton happened to attend this meet, as well as Bill Spear.  Both are shown here in the 10hp car.

 

The White was also bought new by the family, from the local White agent, who was Melton's uncle.  (!)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it was former AACA Director and President Len Rhinehart.  The 1968 AACA register shows him owning a 1927 343 7p touring, fully restored.  He restored it in 1955-56, and apparently drove the car a lot - 870 miles to the 1958 Lake Forest meet, and a 2,600 mile round trip through Greensboro, NC and Daytona in 1965.  Certainly could have driven it to Dearborn.  (Don't know what happened to the sidemount.)

1965-06-17_OrlandoSentinel_Rhinehart1.jpg.17e5763c8823ef38c2a6a3eab00af90d.jpg

1965-06-17_OrlandoSentinel_Rhinehart2.jpg.65ffa458e02c61fd79b6f93691437cb3.jpg

1956-20-3_AA_Rhinehart1.jpg.fbcaa94533846ca3872a132210a13516.jpg

1956-20-3_AA_Rhinehart2.thumb.jpg.02115e971968e6386c37cd8156185687.jpg

Edited by StanleyRegister
added sidemount sentence (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

The sidemount and bolt patterns on the wheels don't bode well for this to be a match, plus the cowl lights and band that were present in the 1950's and today on the Rhinehart car are absent in the 1960's era photo.  I think we're looking at two different cars. Thanks for the old pix from the 50's!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

This 1967 photo shows H. D. Thompson, left, and Bill Carmichael, center, involved with a 1923 Stanley that they owned.  (A 7-passenger touring, presumably a Model 740B.)  They lived in Jackson, TN, and the car was scheduled to participate in the Mid-America Old Time Auto Association meet there on June 15-18, hosted by the West Tennessee Antique Car Club.  The car was said to have been found in Florida, where it had "been left by a retired gentleman from the east."  The car sold out of Mrs. H D Thompson's estate in 1983.

 

Any ideas who may have had it before & after Thompson?

 

1967-05-23_JacksonTNSun_Thompson.thumb.jpg.c3ca254096a957a8fba88ee1a61434d9.jpg

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

a47686725_2025446634238266_1522283001231179776_n.thumb.jpg.6a7a5e1420d27ad475c415408cbfcdbd.jpg.032fabcbf117135f7f403cbfbaa91eca.jpg.6281ed7747c4dfb76d9961f9c566cd31.jpgt

I referenced this Packard photo today on the ID page and  thought this page is a good place to "park" it.  Notice the car on the right with the American flag top boot, the white painted Dual Cowl and sidemounted on the far left (and in front of the Dual Cowl is a rear mounted trunk car with a rear spare, plus to the left of that is another sidemounted touring with stylish trunk on rear.   A surprising number of light painted cars and a surprising amount of rear spare tire cars.  All cars appear to be licensed and plenty have owner's "touches" to them.  I am not sure what the event would be, though it though it had to be in a very large city.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

a47686725_2025446634238266_1522283001231179776_n.thumb.jpg.6a7a5e1420d27ad475c415408cbfcdbd.jpg.032fabcbf117135f7f403cbfbaa91eca.jpg.6281ed7747c4dfb76d9961f9c566cd31.jpgt

I referenced this Packard photo today on the ID page and  thought this page is a good place to "park" it.  Notice the car on the right with the American flag top boot, the white painted Dual Cowl and sidemounted on the far left (and in front of the Dual Cowl is a rear mounted trunk car with a rear spare, plus to the left of that is another sidemounted touring with stylish trunk on rear.   A surprising number of light painted cars and a surprising amount of rear spare tire cars.  All cars appear to be licensed and plenty have owner's "touches" to them.  I am not sure what the event would be, though it though it had to be in a very large city.

Look at how tight some of those top boot covers are!  There is no way a top is actually inside them. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/24/2019 at 10:59 PM, gossp said:

Look at how tight some of those top boot covers are!  There is no way a top is actually inside them. 

The problem tends to be that when the cars are restored the upholsterers want a much thicker pad in the top (helps with "look" of top) and that is why you are use to seeing giant piles of fabric on the back of restored cars today.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The photo shows what is purported to be an 1899 Serial No. 1 Locomobile (Stanley). The photo was taken in 1948 at the home of Edwin Battison in Windsor, Vermont. 

 

Yes, the car still exists as does an early Stanley that climbed Mount Washington on August 31, 1949,  in 4 hours 40 minutes.

 

Battison and his automobiles make for a fascinating read...  https://www.battisonmuseum.org/copy-of-cast-of-character-part-1---mentoring

 

7981879_Stanley_SerialNo1.thumb.jpg.06a55a9f2aeb2d11d79f6deaba204f17.jpg

 

I do hope his collection is saved. (Ed Battison was the founder of the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT.,  where I served as executive director served as the museum's first executive director after Battison's tenure ended.) 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, automuseum said:

 

The photo shows what is purported to be an 1899 Serial No. 1 Locomobile (Stanley). The photo was taken in 1948 at the home of Edwin Battison in Windsor, Vermont. 

 

Yes, the car still exists as does an early Stanley that climbed Mount Washington on August 31, 1949,  in 4 hours 40 minutes.

 

Battison and his automobiles make for a fascinating read...  https://www.battisonmuseum.org/copy-of-cast-of-character-part-1---mentoring

 

7981879_Stanley_SerialNo1.thumb.jpg.06a55a9f2aeb2d11d79f6deaba204f17.jpg

 

I do hope his collection is saved. (Ed Battison was the founder of the American Precision Museum in Windsor, VT.,  where I served as executive director served as the museum's first executive director after Battison's tenure ended.) 

 

 

The Loco was features on "American Pickers" along with the Battison Collection withint he last month or so. 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Packard isn’t listed on the Online Packards list by his name, but I think it has to be one of them there..........it’s too rare of a car for it not to be known from time to time in the clubs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...