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Then and now: where did these prewar cars go?

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So here I sit on day four after spine surgery waiting around and trying to keep active. I noticed the vid from the VMCCA meet above. I though WTH I will give it a look.. I feel that I need to state that I never have really been much interested in pre  WW2 cars and especially Brass era cars.  Just not me. But I have to say that as an elderly male I received an education from that  film. Watching  the activities and seeing how much actual fun everyone seemed to get from driving their cars(in a day when they were cars, not "investments") I though that if I could find a group of people like that I might consider joining that club.  Controlled chaos from the looks, family event down to kids both bored to death and grinning from ear to ear.  Thanks for posting it John. I really enjoyed it.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)
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Many of thr pre war clubs are still like the one in the movie. Many clubs still don’t have judging or Concours displays, HCCA and many others just drive, have fun, and stop at collections along the way. Ed

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Did you see the Duesenberg J sold for $850,000 and a Cadillac V16 sold for $155,000 At Mecum. I would have thought they both would have gone for more. 

Dave S 

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On ‎1‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 9:37 PM, StanleyRegister said:

Here's the Henry Austin Clark Pierce-Arrow wagon on the 1951 Glidden Tour.  It appears to be different from the Al Hood car.  No help in figuring out where either of them is today...

1951-15-04_AntiqueAutomobile_HAC_Pierce.thumb.jpg.afe64d631c92090443d660791dc4d9e8.jpg

 

This Pierce Depot Hack was purchased from Clark and restored with an authentic  four passenger touring car body. It was a frequent participant on New England Gas and Brass tours during the late 1980s/1990s. During this time, it was red and owned by a New England collector.

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John- Thanks so much for posting the VMCCA movies. Wow, I can't stop watching them. So many great cars.

 

I really like the race car "races".

 

That weird, rounded- looking, red race car is the 1909-10 Buick "Bug" race car. It is currently owned by the Sloan Museum in Flint, MI.

 

Obviously Old 16 is at the Henry Ford Museum-I helped get it there!

 

Those big Mercedes/Benz racers were most likely owned by George Waterman at the time of the film, not sure where they are today but they are most likely in one of three collections. The Vanderbilt Renault race car may also have been Waterman's.

 

 

Contrary to what many believe, the use of brass era cars is alive and well today. There are multiple brass car tours all over the country and they are extremely well populated. Some of the large tours attract 100+ cars and they drive them 100+ miles a day for a week or longer. People who collect brass car are typically "drivers" and would rather use their cars instead of displaying them at a show. There is nothing more fun than touring with a brass car.

 

Thanks again for sharing the films.

 

PS- I think this is my favorite thread ever. Thanks to everyone who has contributed.

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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I wonder how many of those 'younger ones' seen in the video got sent off to war two years later!!

 

Craig

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Hello everyone does anyone know of a 1935 Buick 60 series cabriolet convertible that came out of West Virginia in the fifties it was originally a black car painted a sky blue,my father bought this car in 1943 from a used car lot,he had the car until 1947 ,my dad said there was a guy from New York that would always try to buy the car,my father said he would come to town and buy certaincars.after awhile my father and him became friends.my father would deliver coal to businesses farms and homes,my father would keep and eye out for certain cars and let him know when he came to town where they where.the Buick was sold in48 I believe,by then my father had gotten married and started a family and lost touch with the guy from New York.somewhere about 1953 we where back visiting relatives I west Virginia and my father found the Buick for sale at a little car lot in front of I believe hillside auto wrecking.my father finally persuaded my mom into letting him by the Buick back but by then it had been sold and they had no info who bought it or where it went.in68 I was visiting West Virginia and my uncle took me to the wrecking yard I believe it was in Morgantown I asked about the car but they just treated me like some stupid kid.any one remember a car  in the area or a story about the car,I know it’s a long shot but I grew up hearing about the Buick constantly.    Dave

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I hope to see some of you folks with your pre war cars at the AACA National Vintage Tour. Coming August 4 - 9 in Kingston Ont. as we have a good many miles of country roads to travel and things to do and see. Now we planed this event for brass cars also to attend as a hub tour to park your cars back in the trailer for the night if you wish. If you look at a map you will see Kingston is less than an Hr. from the boarder and no big hills in this area. 

 Contact me for any info on the tour. Thanks Joe

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Does anyone know whose car had a small fire about 11 minutes into the film?

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At first I thought the fire was part of the act but quickly realized it wasn't.

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18 hours ago, SC38DLS said:

Did you see the Duesenberg J sold for $850,000 and a Cadillac V16 sold for $155,000 At Mecum. I would have thought they both would have gone for more. 

Dave S 

 

 That’s why they were in Mecum....

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The big green Simplex was local to me in Western Mass for decades, and recently traded hands, it was bought new by the Atwater-Kent family.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

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The '12 Simplex in the film was being driven by its original owner, Eleonora Sears.  Sam Eliot owned the car in '39.  I'm not a good judge of color!

Sears.jpg

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1914 Lewis, I believe built in Racine, at a meet decades ago.  Supposedly the car was discovered in Vermont.  This might be the only example that survived, and I assume it's alive and well, somewhere.

1914 Lewis.jpg

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These photos were taken in the very early '40s.  The owner was Sheriff Jesse Z. Feese, of Alma, Nebraska.  The 1909 White on the right side of the group photo is known today  The Stanley Mountain Wagon was initially snagged by James Melton, and in modern times it won a Best In Class at Amelia Island last year.  But the 1910 White in the middle of the group, and in the individual photo, remains a mystery.  Any ideas?

3cars_print_correct.thumb.jpg.534a4899abe9eabdbdecd2ad998694b6.jpg

1910_family.thumb.jpg.c2e4a4ce0fa9e0547290ca2e24e9c9b5.jpg

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The first L 29 Cord, pictured with the same backdrop as the infamous lost L 29 Speedster, was an Al Leamy designed prototype  that didn't make it into production.  However the style was used on Auburns.  Picture is from the files of the late Agnes Leamy.  The second and third are of an L 29 designed by Franklin Hershey.  Same location which has been identified, Connersville?  I'm uncertain.    Back when, he told me that when the car was built a mistake was made and the roof at the front was made too low.   I think it looks pretty cool that way anyway. 
Slim chance either have survived. 

MVC-001S.JPG

MVC-002S.JPG

MVC-003S.JPG

Edited by Dave Henderson (see edit history)
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Franklin Hershey did a handful of cars in that same basic style. On a Model J they called it a Town Limousine. Interesting chrome tire cover which I also have seen on some of his other one off cars. He was still designing cars in thr mid fifties, and the Ford Thunderbird is his best known work.

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On ‎1‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 4:47 PM, motoringicons said:

Contrary to what many believe, the use of brass era cars is alive and well today. There are multiple brass car tours all over the country and they are extremely well populated. Some of the large tours attract 100+ cars and they drive them 100+ miles a day for a week or longer. People who collect brass car are typically "drivers" and would rather use their cars instead of displaying them at a show. There is nothing more fun than touring with a brass car.

Arguably, the Brighton Run in England is the highest proof of this, despite being held in November every year when its cold and wet.

 

Craig

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Here is Ed Zelinsky in his Stanley 740 sedan in 1965, firing up a cold burner, judging by the reaction of the crowd.  Reported as either a 1922 or 1923, he owned it from at least 1962 to 1983.  My roster only shows a handful of sedans from this period, and I'm not sure which one this is.  Any help with earlier or later owners would be appreciated.

1965-08-22_SFExaminer_Zelinsky_1923.jpg.9589dca69d24a4294d7842d169b3c89d.jpg

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On 12/17/2018 at 3:04 PM, StanleyRegister said:

Many many mystery Stanley pix on file - here are a few.

...

 

 

And, a couple of early ones.  First is bandleader Jack Teagarden, probably in 1939.  He had his beloved Stanley shipped to Texas at that time so he could drive it there while associated with some show.  He put it in storage and managed to forget about it for 10 years, and gave it to the garage owner for storage fees.  So sometime around 1949, a very nice Model 64 became available in Texas.  (Although it looks like the burner is out of it at the moment.)  This image came from a blog that I can no longer locate.

Teagarden_1939maybe.thumb.jpg.fccd29127c18ef697e931b6f69115e02.jpg

 

 

 

In case you need it, here is that blog where this photo came from.  Not sure if somewhere else in this thread someone answered.

 

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-and-history/jack-teagarden-machinist-265464/

 

 

This photo from that blog was priceless--perhaps a little off topic.

tea9.JPG.9ac3b7f17b050c1b59261d0b7feaa7e9.JPG

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3 hours ago, RavingFans said:

tea9.JPG.9ac3b7f17b050c1b59261d0b7feaa7e9.JPG

He will lose points for the 'droopy' door handle!

 

Craig

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