twin6

Then and now: where did these prewar cars go?

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The thing that I find amazing is the majority of these cars are just unrestored "used cars".  A 1910 car was less than 30 years old in 1939.  Many of the scenes in this film could have been filmed last week. A real time machine .

 

Greg

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14 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

The thing that I find amazing is the majority of these cars are just unrestored "used cars".  A 1910 car was less than 30 years old in 1939.  Many of the scenes in this film could have been filmed last week. A real time machine .

 

Greg

My dad mentions this all the time - when we bought the 1931 Cadillac in 1974 the car was 43 years old and the many cars in between ...., but when we bought the 1955 Buick in 2015 the car was 60 years old.

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WOW! What a great quality film, and in color! I'll dig out the program so we can ID the cars & owners. Bob 

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If the car was 36 years old I guess the photo dates to around 1946. What is it, were was ,it and who has it now? Bob 

DSCF9662.JPG

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1 hour ago, John_Mereness said:

My dad mentions this all the time - when we bought the 1931 Cadillac in 1974 the car was 43 years old and the many cars in between ...., but when we bought the 1955 Buick in 2015 the car was 60 years old.

John: Thank you again and again for posting this! As was pointed out some of the teens cars would be considered "used cars". I find it wonderful that some of the early cars still had white /gray tires. Obviously even as a replacement the tires would have been over 25 years old. Mostly white tires disappeared with the advent of balloon tires in the mid 20s. And reproductions did not exist in 1939.

For me A lot of early Buick action. 1905, 1908 and 1911. And then at 11:20 an engine fire to boot! 

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On 12/31/2018 at 4:42 PM, twin6 said:

Olds Autocrat in a parade of antique cars, Ocean City, NJ c. 1948.  Who owned it then, and where is it today?

Ocean City, NJ.jpg

 

Who would have thought there'd be another photo available, of the same car at the same event?!?  This one was printed in the program for the June 11-18, 1949 Antique Auto Show in Philadelphia.

1949_PhilaAntiqueAutoShow_1911Olds.thumb.jpg.94570fa1fdcfb8974b51de21235ac114.jpg

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The Olds is either in Rhode Island or Michigan, as of last count there were only two. The Michigan car is apart, the Rhode Island car is white and an older restoration.

 

Fred Roe was in the single cylender Cadillac going over the logs trying to balance the cocktail tray....a common pre war car event, as well as the teeter toter. Fred went on to wright the definitive book on Duesenberg cars......after owning a bunch of them. Right around this time is when Fred bought the Amelia Earhart Kissel Gold Bug Speedster. 

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Film on the 1939 meet: folks driving, testing, gaming, getting dirty, and generally enjoying themselves! Not to mention the period costumes and the well-dressed spectators. Loved it.

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Just now, zipdang said:

Film on the 1939 meet: folks driving, testing, gaming, getting dirty, and generally enjoying themselves! Not to mention the period costumes and the well-dressed spectators. Loved it.

 

Can you imagine the people losing their minds at a show today if you asked them to drive it on the tilting device or over the sandbags? It seems that the only contest most owners will agree to these days is "how gently can you touch it with a duster?"

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37 minutes ago, StanleyRegister said:

 

Who would have thought there'd be another photo available, of the same car at the same event?!?  This one was printed in the program for the June 11-18, 1949 Antique Auto Show in Philadelphia.

1949_PhilaAntiqueAutoShow_1911Olds.thumb.jpg.94570fa1fdcfb8974b51de21235ac114.jpg

11-Olds-Autocrat-7-DV-17_SJC_011-800.jpg.f1a5379ac8526058a22282e77d4733ba.jpg

11-Olds-Autocrat-7-DV-17_SJC_07-800.jpg.f38e52f3c5d418cff5f7d21460ffec27.jpg

This could be the Car - RM Auctions had it on display at Concours d'Elegance of America in I believe 2017.  The tool box/luggage had a really cool set of initials on it and I asked if they knew the initials and was told no.   Curiously, when you see the name DuPont and Wilmington DE there usually is more often than not a correlation (also I believe a state that perhaps even into the 80's or ... where the lower the license plate number generally meant you were more or less a pioneer in automobiles there).

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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14 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Can you imagine the people losing their minds at a show today if you asked them to drive it on the tilting device or over the sandbags? It seems that the only contest most owners will agree to these days is "how gently can you touch it with a duster?"

I have seen pictures of the tilting/balancing devices in AACA, HCCA, VMCCA or something like that within the past 10 - 15 years - ie. some event still has one. 

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43 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Can you imagine the people losing their minds at a show today if you asked them to drive it on the tilting device or over the sandbags? It seems that the only contest most owners will agree to these days is "how gently can you touch it with a duster?"

Thank god there are still plenty of people out there that tour, drive to events, and ... (aka man over machine).  And it always strikes me as odd when someone wants to treat something of ours like a holy grail and does not understand kids in it, the dog, lunch, luggage, a couple hundred miles of road dirt, and ... My mom's parents were always "cover those seats with plastic and let's get floor mats in there, while  dad's parents were "let's go and who are we saving it for."  Today, that is a little reversed - Mom was annoyed by  X and feels you should use it and if it needs restored again then do that and dad is pretty careful, though still the first one to get a car out of the garage for anyone who looks like they should want to go driving. 

 

The beverages they were balancing at the end while they were driving over logs was interesting - people were wearing white, people holding the tray inside car, and so forth - I had to say if just water that would have been fine, but whatever it was looked RED (and I would guess in 1939 anything red stained). 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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28 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

T"let's go and who are we saving it for." 

 

That's my attitude exactly. All these guys who spend a fortune restoring a car and then refuse to drive it "to preserve the value" so the next guy can have a really nice car for pennies on the dollar. With most cars, you're never getting your money back on the restoration; you may as well enjoy it yourself rather than just handing it all to the next guy for free.

 

Nothing better than buying someone else's 100-point car for 50% of what he spent restoring it, then driving it down to 80 points. 

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Just now, Matt Harwood said:

 

That's my attitude exactly. All these guys who spend a fortune restoring a car and then refuse to drive it "to preserve the value" so the next guy can have a really nice car for pennies on the dollar. With most cars, you're never getting your money back on the restoration; you may as well enjoy it yourself rather than just handing it all to the next guy for free.

 

Nothing better than buying someone else's 100-point car for 50% of what he spent restoring it, then driving it down to 80 points. 

I know of a guy who followed a 1931 Chrysler roadster his whole life, finally got it and did a rotisserie restoration on it. ONLY drives it off and back on the trailer at shows. Never goes out on the road to enjoy it. Shame.

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21 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

I know of a guy who followed a 1931 Chrysler roadster his whole life, finally got it and did a rotisserie restoration on it. ONLY drives it off and back on the trailer at shows. Never goes out on the road to enjoy it. Shame.

A SHAME !

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I always find it odd that people think you have to drive the wheels of a car to "enjoy" it . The above mentioned Chrysler owner may be having a great time rolling the car off the trailer, his car, to do what he wants with it. Were is the fun when a connecting rod pops out the side of the oil pan? 

 

Bob

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2 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

I always find it odd that people think you have to drive the wheels of a car to "enjoy" it . The above mentioned Chrysler owner may be having a great time rolling the car off the trailer, his car, to do what he wants with it. Were is the fun when a connecting rod pops out the side of the oil pan? 

 

Bob

 

I agree with you Bob.  I think there are many ways to enjoy your cars.  Driving them is fun,  but for some guys scrounging parts for a life long project tucked in the corner is giving them joy too.

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Wonderful film of one of the early meets. My father was at that meet driving up from Philadelphia in his 2nd series Packard twin six with George Gerenbeck, George Hughes and Ted Fiala. The 8MM black and white movies that he took are not nearly as nice as the Cam Bradley ones. I can identify a number of the cars and people based on seeing the movie many times and hearing who was in which car. The various events and contests were common at many of the events except spearing the hoops off of the stanchions. I specifically remember being told how someone fell out of the car while attempting this feat. Many great cars and wonderful people, a number of which I can still identify. The race cars are especially wonderful and I wonder who is driving Old 16, perhaps Joe Sessions since I believe he owned it at the time of this meet.

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My hobby is building them. I like the challenge of restoring a car the way it sat on the showroom floor after dealer prep.

When I get done with one I start on another. If I want a great driving experience I hop in the late model Corvette.

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14 hours ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

Wonderful film of one of the early meets. My father was at that meet driving up from Philadelphia in his 2nd series Packard twin six with George Gerenbeck, George Hughes and Ted Fiala. The 8MM black and white movies that he took are not nearly as nice as the Cam Bradley ones. I can identify a number of the cars and people based on seeing the movie many times and hearing who was in which car. The various events and contests were common at many of the events except spearing the hoops off of the stanchions. I specifically remember being told how someone fell out of the car while attempting this feat. Many great cars and wonderful people, a number of which I can still identify. The race cars are especially wonderful and I wonder who is driving Old 16, perhaps Joe Sessions since I believe he owned it at the time of this meet.

It is a fabulous film, and it's interesting to learn what was of interest to viewers today from the posts.  For a one day event, they sure squeezed in a lot of activity.  I enjoyed seeing Frank Gardner, then a teenager, in his Franklin doing an admirable job on the teeter-totter.  Was that a young Austin Clark overseeing that event, standing behind?  Bradley and Waterman furnished a lot of cars that day.

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It would take a lot of work but would be nice to track down every car from that meet and get a photo of them today.  Eighty years in the hobby that sure makes them special. Bob 

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Bob, the 5 or so Packards and owners at the time and present owners are known. Same is true with the 3 Mercers and probably the various race cars, many of which appeared to belong to George Waterman. The Mercedes people can no doubt tell about the S or SS (?) driven by Charlie Stitch with Ralph DePalma as a passenger. Also, founding VMCCA member and long time AACA member Paul Cadwell in his T. Certainly many VMCCA members could add a lot more.

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The 1911 Stanley model 63 at Raceland was one of many cars entered that day by Cam Bradley.  Subsequent owners included Austin Clark.  We know the car's first owner resided in West Burke, Vermont.  This photo is of a similar car taken during the Chelsea, Vermont Old Home Days parade in 1934, then owned by Max Hayward.  No one seems to know what happened to Hayward's car.  Did it not survive the WW2 scrap drives, or could it possibly be the model 63 that Bradley owned in 1939?

Chelsea.JPG

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