trimacar

What are some of the great "missing" Classics, prewar American?

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Curti said:

The part number for chrome wire wheels is : E10766  They were available on all Auburn body styles, speedsters included.   All  speedsters  came from the factory with wheel disks. Probably the chrome wires were dealer installed.  

 The stainless spokes  originated at J.C. Whitney and Western Auto.

 

 

The stainless spokes were patented in 1930 and assigned to Budd Wheel company.   They are probably about as "period correct" as the full chrome wheels.   Of course, I don't  like either.

 

Btw, who do you think was the mastermind behind the reproductions in the 80s?

BuddSpokePatent.jpg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cadillac offered the stainless spoke covers in 30 & 31.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, edinmass said:

 

Interesting car, interesting history, and I agree, not a full CCCA Classic. But nowadays they let everything in, so I expect that it will make the cut. 

 

I agree with you Ed.   Doesn't fit the strict definition that you and I believe in.   But it is still cooler than a 48 woodie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chrome wheels with BLACK tires can look pretty good on open fender cars.  The later aerodynamic cars like the Auburn look better when the hub caps.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.a0c5142af6820d2e2b09fa8802d501a7.jpeg

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

48411225_2245088889043484_5745212679086145536_n.jpg

 

If we are allowed to go European this thread could go another 100 pages.  Didn't Harrah build a replica of the roadster?

 

image.png.71506875640710ce1710e01fc35806aa.png

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, alsancle said:

 

If we are allowed to go European this thread could go another 100 pages. 

 

 

Yes, off topic, though I stumbled across picture on Facebook and of all I have seen, did not recall this particular one.

 

A large group of us had the discussion yesterday (Porsche restoration facility open house) and they were talking about how the war effected car survival in Europe and I countered with the war quite patriotic to turn in your American RR or X and it basically allowed a new Merlin Engine to be built or ...  Interestingly, though a friend was telling me of their lake house discovery ---- "Well, it seems they just kept the house though no one went down there for the last 50 years - turns out the garage was an easier place to park things than it was to sell them."

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, alsancle said:

Another view of the Lincoln which we think didn't make it. 

 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.ab0b82c78d50f3bed53b01b35d427bc9.jpeg

Along the same lines in a Pierce Arrow - these LeBaron Sedans are stunningu1130-d.jpg.44c0841c135311998b1277a87ffff1c1.jpg.

 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, edinmass said:

Cadillac offered the stainless spoke covers in 30 & 31.

 As did Franklin in 1930, with their surviving factory drawings, including the specifications and tests to determine the quality of the stainless steel spokes used by Motor Wheel.

 

Paul 

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having  been a fascinated wallflower here with little or nothing to offer, I sense an opportunity to get up off it. For the 1-3 percent of "youse" who do not recognize that low - slung FWD European Exotique, that and it's well - louvered brother, they are French cars : Bucciali. (Pronounced  boo - cheeAH - lee). I have seen 1 or 2 at the Mullin in Oxnard, CA. Also, maybe 15, 20 or more years ago, one of the most exaggerated, (stunning  - almost a caricature of high classic styling), examples of custom coach work ever put on wheels. I was familiar with that very car from a picture which made a literally indelible impression on me as a kid. What a surprise it was to round a corner at "The Pete' " and almost faint away staring at a 1/4 rear view of the thing !!!!!!!! I had not been forewarned. 

 

From the same book, (a Clymer), I recall a very exotic Gregoire. Seems to me it had two entire straight eights, their independent crankshafts being geared together. Am I remembering correctly, or am I wandering around in that other Southern California attraction where Mick The Mouse and Don The Duck rule ? If I am not in fact in D'land, does that twin milled machine yet exist ? 

 

Now look : speaking of So. Cal., if any of you are fortunate enough to escape Winter with a trip to that warm California sun, DO take in the Mullin. I've said it before, I'll say it now : check out availability for a reservation, and adjust your vacation accordingly. You will want to take the earliest possible guided "tour", and then, fueled by a hearty breakfast and plenty of coffee, spend the rest of what is actually a rather short day, (closing time is 3:00 IIRC), on your own. The docents are very knowledgeable, and you will enjoy the generosity of their time as the fascinating discussions that take place there are as varied as the snowflakes you have escaped.  -  Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, alsancle said:

I think I asked Jason about this once and he thought it was alive but unrestored.   If you are really really sharp, you can pick out what is in the background,  which also survived and made it Pebble eventually.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.6a09703fe33f1262d4ab77aa0d572bc7.jpeg

 

This 1930 Model M Stutz was owned in Ontario, Canada for many years and then sold to Europe about 10 years ago.   It came out of Argentina I believe.  Per the person who owned it in Canada, it appears it originally had a Weymann body on it and some of the wood in the cowl was nearly identical to another Weymann bodied Stutz he had.   The rest of the body he believed to be Galle coachwork.   So we think what happened is when the leather covered Weymann body fell apart, someone took this Galle body off another chassis (almost 100% certain a European chassis) and put it on the Stutz.  It looked OK, but needed a little work in the back to make the proportions look right when looking at it from the side profile view.  I think the car is in Holland now and slowly being worked on.    As for the car in the back ground...no comment.     

 

    

 

 

 

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To John Mereness, I think the Franklin pictured a couple posts above is alive. I think it is one of the last Walker bodied customs. It is in the Franklin Museum at The Gilmore in Michigan . I am not 100% sure but it looks like the same car. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, John_Mereness said:

amer283.jpg.87bb706d4bb44fd9f08d4e9f04ad6636.jpg

Speaking of Franklins - a 1931 that is not know to exist.

 

Full chrome wheels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carl, I'll second your motion about a visit to the Mullin. We were there last January, I didn't know the Bugatti collection would be rolled out and replaced with Citroen, but is was very educational. Bumped into a friend from the next town over I hadn't seen in years. I always like those small world travel 3,000 miles to meet some one deals. Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you imagine the excitement of finding this car back in 1987.  In my opinion, one of the most beautiful cars ever built!

IMG_4367.JPG

IMG_4368.JPG

IMG_4370.JPG

IMG_4376.JPG

IMG_4372.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

20 minutes ago, 29 franklin said:

To John Mereness, I think the Franklin pictured a couple posts above is alive. I think it is one of the last Walker bodied customs. It is in the Franklin Museum at The Gilmore in Michigan . I am not 100% sure but it looks like the same car. 

It is a similar car, though not the one that survives (close in the tail, but "slightly" different in the belt moldings and does not have the drop sill doors of the Pirate style).

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, V16 said:

Can you imagine the excitement of finding this car back in 1987.  In my opinion, one of the most beautiful cars ever built!

 

 

IMG_4370.JPG

1932 Packard Dietrich Bodies Cars in "Customs" really are stunning - every single one of them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...