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What are some of the great "missing" Classics, prewar American?


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3 minutes ago, alsancle said:

what are the differences between 32 and 33?

 

I have no idea...........32’s are very rare, and 33’s are just about non existent. The one at the shop was the auto show car if I am not mistaken. In 1933 they only built a TOTAL of eight chassis on the Prsident line, and that’s all body styles. 

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19 minutes ago, alsancle said:

what are the differences between 32 and 33?

Presumably, the semi-skirted front fenders are 1933, and 1932 would lack the semi-skirts--just like Pierce, owned at the time by Studebaker, and with similar fender lines.

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There are a lot of cool Stude’s. The guy with the 33 President Roadster has a one off custom aluminum bodied 1938 President built in Canada, along with some other strange and very low production or prototype cars. Stude builds lots of cars every year, and I think they built quite a few specials for the auto shows........there are expanses of Convertible Sedans that were not in the catalogues but maybe half a dozen were made and sold to dealers, favored customers, and the like. They are similar to Auburn in size, fit, and finish with the production cars. The limited and special stuff seem to be a bit higher in quality than the production stuff. President production volume was decent from 28-30 and then it fell off a cliff. There are several collectors who focus on the big cars...........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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I had my hands all over this 1932 Studebaker President Four Seasons Roadster -  a good friend owned and combo restored/project managed his own restoration, but when it came to drivability the car fell  short and basically had to be all re-gone through (along the way though it was obvious the car was AACA, CCCA, and Concours suited and I spent a lot of time upgrading it for that too). 

e662bf0f4799f3f54022bd6c0fc533da.jpg

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2 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

I had my hands all over this 1932 Studebaker President Four Seasons Roadster -  a good friend owned and combo restored/project managed his own restoration, but when it came to drivability the car fell  short and basically had to be all re-gone through (along the way though it was obvious the car was AACA, CCCA, and Concours suited and I spent a lot of time upgrading it for that too). 

e662bf0f4799f3f54022bd6c0fc533da.jpg

I certainly hope not!!

 

Here's another '32 in Post #19 here--------------------->  http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?28963-More-Eye-Candy-12-16-Prewar

 

Craig

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10 minutes ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

Very nice DV32 Stutz which hopefully is being enjoyed by present owner. Picture probably taken in 1940's with owner at that time unknown. Where is it now?

 

There are a few of them still around.  Jason will know exactly which one this is.  

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

Not a Classic,  but a shame it doesn't exist anymore.

 

image.thumb.jpeg.840ea0e33727e86121079dfae9ded2f2.jpeg

 

 

AJ- did you zoom in on thr photo on th wall above the car?

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#9 didn't make it either,  and it might be on a Classic chassis as we are thinking Wills St Clair.

 

#10, which I posted before starred in a Hollywood serial "Burn-em Up Barnes" made in 1934. In Chapter 2  Burn-em up tests a new high powered car.

 

Here is a link to where you can watch the whole episode.  There are some good car scenes.

 

https://archive.org/details/burn_em_up_barnes_2/part2.mp4

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Wasn’t sure if you caught the photo on the wall......it was rather obscure. Like the seat uhpolstery on #9. 

 

Im quite sure the chassis is Wills........

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, edinmass said:

Wasn’t sure if you caught the photo on the wall......it was rather obscure. Like the seat uhpolstery on #9. 

 

Im quite sure the chassis is Wills........

 

Here is a picture of #10 in its final configuration with Gus standing next to it.    What do you suppose the powerplant is?    Also, better picture of #9.    Any chance #9 because #10?

 

image.jpeg.885e044f9321a372457769d8022f6719.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.d80c76a9cf90089fa549fcde2756f329.jpeg

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On 12/28/2018 at 8:40 PM, A. Ballard 35R said:

Very nice DV32 Stutz which hopefully is being enjoyed by present owner. Picture probably taken in 1940's with owner at that time unknown. Where is it now?

img285.jpg

Can someone zoom in on the license plate?  That would help identify which car it is today.   

Edited by K8096 (see edit history)
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License plate numbers appear to be 02 Z 867 but very difficult to determine state, possibly California.  In lower right corner windshield looks like a C gas rationing sticker. Can't make out other stickers.

Just noticed that sedan next to Stutz is a Packard which due to the cowl lights would be from the 1920's.

Edited by A. Ballard 35R
Correction and additional information (see edit history)
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I confirmed the Stutz conv sedan is alive and well and under restoration.   The photo posted was taken in the early 1950s when it was in California.  It spent time in England in the 1980's & 90's, before coming back to the US.         

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1 hour ago, K8096 said:

I confirmed the Stutz conv sedan is alive and well and under restoration.   The photo posted was taken in the early 1950s when it was in California.  It spent time in England in the 1980's & 90's, before coming back to the US.         

 

So it is this one?

 

image.jpeg.ad7e1c8ac95931ea5eb2cb8634d32339.jpeg

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I found this recently on the Franklin Automobile Enthusiasts page of Facebook

 

“El Pirata” from Dietrich. Extract from the ACN article July 77#70 p.4 by William H. Schemel who interviewed Mr. Dietrich then in his 80’s
About the El Pirata project...”The entire project was accomplished by Mr. Dietrich just to sell his styling designs to Mr. Franklin. After this had been accomplished, the automobile was displayed at several automobile shows until it was finally sold in 1929. A personal friend of Mr. Franklin, W.L. Augustine of Canada, purchased the car after he saw it in the New York Auto Show. He immediately had the car painted jet black, removed the rear fender skirts and fitted the car with regular 1929 wire wheels. Even with this comparatively drab appearance, the automobile continued to cause a great sensation In Canada.
In a matter of a few weeks of arrival in Montreal, the car was stolen from it from in front of a theatre where Mr. Augustine was enjoying the show, while the vandals were enjoying his car. The following day the car was found wrecked and completely burnt out. The identity of the joy riders as well as their real intentions remains a mystery. Truly and unfitting end for the original ”El Pirata”.

In Montréal the translated newspaper ad reads: “ A $1000 Reward will be paid for any information related to the destruction by fire of this car in St-Jérôme (north of Montreal, Québec, Ca). On December 2nd, 1929.
This Franklin Car with a special body was stolen out of Montreal on the same day.
All communications will be kept in strict confidence.
(A. Audette transl. 2019)

The same ACN article reads:
« In the fall of 1927 Ray Dietrich purchased a chassis from the Franklin Motor Car Co. and had it shipped to Detroit. He had for several years considered running boards as ugly dirt catchers which made it difficult to keep the interior of the car clean. He also knew Mr. Franklin‘s background quite well and theorize that Mr. Franklin would be receptive to a rather radical design which would not even be considered by some of the more conservative big names corporations that he was designing for, like Lincoln and Packard.
Over the next 4 to 6 months, spanning the end of 1927 and the start of 1928 he designed and built a sedan that had large doors that flared out at the bottom and concealed both the frame and the running boards. The front fenders had a crown that was brought up to a little crest at the tip. They were wider than the body and brought in just ahead of the front doors in the bobbed fashion. The back of the car was straight across but had a gentle curve over the rear wheels that provided space for a small enclosed luggage compartment. The wheels had large disk covers and the rear wheels were almost completely concealed by full fender skirts decorated with stylized spears resembling the louvres on the hood. The grill had a rather narrow shell that surrounded automatically regulated shutter bars which controlled the air intake into engine compartment. The long, narrow hood had horizontally placed louvers that were spaced so as to conform with the contour of the fenders, giving a hint of the forward rush so typical of Franklin’s ability on the road. The louvers, designed for a strictly mechanical function, also served an artistic decorative purpose. The slender trimness of the hood was capped by the piercing rifle-sight mounting of the coxcomb crest at its tip and was flanked by twin spare tired mounted in front fender wells. The headlights were large Ryan lights and the tail light was flared out from the rear deck, having three lenses for break, tail and back-up lights.
There was also a streamlined triangular courtesy light that shone forward from the rear quarter when the door was open. The entire body was finished in highly polished aluminum paint, satin aluminum fittings and trimmed in doll gold. »

 

Update:  

 

André Audette Just found that W. Augustine owned the agency MARMON MONTREAL MOTORS LIMITED.
Marmon & Roosevelt Motor Cars On 3437-3445 Park Avenue

 

 

 

Neil Sugermeyer Andre - ... I wonder if the chassis was updated at some point as if it was a ''27 as the story indicates it was at first, it would have had the transmission brake, not four wheel hydraulics which first came out in 1928. Still a bit of history to find out about.


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