philipj

Engine Analyzer for 6 volt systems...

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Have any of you guys ever seen an engine analyzer for 6 volt system vehicles? If I try to purchase something like this, could it be used to accurately measure dwell and rpm?

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Sears-sequential-dual-meter-28-2182-automotive-analyzer-excel-in-box/253894384141?hash=item3b1d48da0d:g:ub8AAOSw7bpbm8ys:rk:23:pf:0

 

Edited by philipj (see edit history)

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I'm pretty sure it will measure dwell and rpm accurately as that is not vehicle voltage dependent.  I have an old Snap On dwell tach and it has 2 leads, one goes to ground, one goes to the negative post on the coil.  I think the batteries in the analyzer supply the power for these tests. 

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Interesting to see a 16 volt and 32 volt setting.  Not sure what that would be used for back in the day.   

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Some equipment works and some doesn't. Then there is the issue of dwellmeter accuracy, and how to calibrate. That rabbit hole runs really deep. You can read for hours if you want.

 

I bought actual antique 6 volt equipment, and then I had to repair it. Some modern units should work right out of the box, it is just hard to tell which ones.

 

If you connect the dwell meter with the points open, and it goes to the number of degrees that exists between cylinders (45 degrees on an 8 cylinder, 60 degrees on a 6, etc.), then the dwell function should work on any car.

 

RPM would have to be checked against another meter I guess.

 

I do suggest you stick with analog meters. My attempts to use digital tachs and timing lights on 6 volt cars so far has been frustrating and fruitless. The ignition, or maybe the generator system just generates too much electrical noise. I also tried a Harbor Freight laser tach to avoid connecting electrically. it locks up if I get it close to the engine.

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1 hour ago, Hubert_25-25 said:

Interesting to see a 16 volt and 32 volt setting.  Not sure what that would be used for back in the day.

 

Those are voltage scales for the charging system. The scales are on the left meter. The "16v" one resolves down to 0.2 volts, good enough for setting up regulators on 6 and 12 volt cars, barely. They also have charging voltage "normal" ranges marked.

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I have one similar to that one that works fine. I think mine is a bit older than the one on Ebay. Look closely on Ebay and you will usually find a lot of them available and often cheaper than that one. 

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I have an portable Sears oscilloscope that works fine, but...to power it needs to be attached to a 12 volt power supply.  I just hook the +&- leads to a 12 volt battery and it works fine.  I can also see all of the spark traces for the engine on the scope.

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I do the same with my inductive timing light, just pull up a 12V battery close by and connect the leads.

 

Most ignition systems use a resistance device when they operate, either a ballast resistor or resistor wire so even the 12V will be operating at a lower voltage.

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And the 12V battery need NOT be a big honking starting battery:  I use a sealed gel cell or AGM gate opening / home security alarm backup battery which I also use to power my 2007-vintage Garmin GPS in my 6V cars.  (Yeah, I know, I should use my smart phone as GPS, but its screen is smaller.)

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I use the 12 volt battery out of my trailer brake system.  small gel battery  and easy to remove and relatively inexpensive.

 

Bob  Engle

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I just purchased a new digital timing light/dwell meter/volt meter/ and it clearly states when using on a 6 volt vehicle to use a 12 volt battery as the power source. It did also mention grounding the 12 volt battery to the six volt vehicle also. I have both 6 and 12 volt Buicks, so should come in handy as they both run standard points ignition systems.

hope this helps

Rodney 😀😀😀😀

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Thank you all for your input..I just found this unit that works on 6 and 12 volt vehicles... Looks very promising.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-1970s-RAC-Dwell-Tach-Volt-Amp-Points-Ignition-Tune-Up-Analyzer/132791822018?_trkparms=aid%3D888007%26algo%3DDISC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D52935%26meid%3D1af8dc9febe341adb2df95fc89cc76f9%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D192621588608%26itm%3D132791822018&_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982

 

Or if this is a better analyzer, does anyone know how to use the 3v, 16v and 32v scale? I think that Bloo touched on that subject earlier, but still a bit unclear...

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/254023688452?ViewItem=&item=254023688452

 

Will anything with a 3 volt scale work on a 6 volt system car? Thank you for your help.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/382478440702

Edited by philipj (see edit history)

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