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I was wondering where on this website I would post if I was looking to rent picture cars for a film of mine. Any info appreciated. Thanks!!

 

Ted.

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Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. You are likely to receive a lot more responses if you were to post a little bit more information. Most importantly, since this forum has members from all over the US and and many other Countries, posting your location will narrow your target audience down to those close enough to potentially be interested. You also should indicate what era cars you are looking for. Maybe a bit of information about the film might help sell your potential car suppliers to be willing to consider renting to you. It is also very important to be able to convince people that you are a legitimate filmmaker who understands the insurance requirements and other logistcs of renting picture cars. Many antique car owners are a bit gunshy about renting their cars out without them being the one to drive it, or at least supervising the use of the car. You will find people here who are receptive, as well as people who are absolutely opposed to this use. Most have formed that position based on previous experience with movie car rentals. 

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 A friend of mine is renting out three cars to a film company. The terms of the contract inc. $2,000,000 insurance, pickup and delivery by Intercity Lines, hotel and food, $500 for each car plus traveling expenses.

 The owner may not drive the car because he is not a member of a union union, but his wife and daughter can as they belong to a union.

 There will be an agent of the insurance company on the scene to observe and pay for any damage.

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)

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1 minute ago, Roger Walling said:

  The owner may not drive the car because he is not a member of a union union, but his wife and daughter can as they belong to a union.

 

What a ridiculous requirement imposed by the

film company!  It is HIS car.

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59 minutes ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

What a ridiculous requirement imposed by the

film company!  It is HIS car.

 

Not uncommon. While I'm generally in favor of unions, the work requirement is kind of odd at first glance. I used to do trade shows like SEMA and I'd show up with a half-dozen other employees of the company for which we worked, and we'd have to just sit there and wait for the union guys to come over and plug in our extension cords, lay out our carpet, and assemble our booth. We couldn't do any of it, and if we tried, someone came over and yelled at us and undid anything we did. Even if we wanted to help, we couldn't. It wasn't that we didn't want to pay them, it's that we had to sit there and wait for hours when there was plenty of stuff we could have done ourselves.

 

However, I don't think this is an unusual requirement where a union is involved. It's part of their contract and I can understand them wanting to protect their jobs, such as they are. How would you feel if you had a job, but your boss found an intern who would come in and do it for free? How long do you think your job would be safe after they discovered that there was a corner to cut? I get it.

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Ted,

   You want to post location of the movie and what years you are trying to portray.  So say you want 1960, you most likely want a couple 1960 cars more 59, 58, 57 and maybe a few older?   I have done a few movies we got about $200 a day for the cars and $75 for the drivers, they wanted us to stay near the cars and the owners drove them, less liability problems? 

 

Good Luck

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3 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

What a ridiculous requirement imposed by the

film company!  It is HIS car.

 But the drivers are considered "actors" requiring a union card.

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When I did the driving for Universal Pictures they used a go between company to get the cars.  Each day of filming I received a "Union Voucher" as an extra on the set, after 10 vouchers I could apply to get in the union.  I was told it would get me preferential treatment if I wanted to be an extra on more films (not necessarily with the old cars).  After spending 14 hours days for over two weeks (they took Mondays off) never had a single union problem.  It was a good experience but tiring, the movie people worked crazy hours.  I would say the picture car people, especially the interns slept 3-4 hours a night, if they slept.

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Not uncommon. While I'm generally in favor of unions, the work requirement is kind of odd at first glance. I used to do trade shows like SEMA and I'd show up with a half-dozen other employees of the company for which we worked, and we'd have to just sit there and wait for the union guys to come over and plug in our extension cords, lay out our carpet, and assemble our booth. We couldn't do any of it, and if we tried, someone came over and yelled at us and undid anything we did. Even if we wanted to help, we couldn't. It wasn't that we didn't want to pay them, it's that we had to sit there and wait for hours when there was plenty of stuff we could have done ourselves.

 

However, I don't think this is an unusual requirement where a union is involved. It's part of their contract and I can understand them wanting to protect their jobs, such as they are. How would you feel if you had a job, but your boss found an intern who would come in and do it for free? How long do you think your job would be safe after they discovered that there was a corner to cut? I get it.

Union rules at bethlehem steel was the same way. If a piece of wood needed to be moved the electriction would sit and wait until a carpenter came over to move it. Job protection you know.

Ask those guys what they are doing these days......

Bob

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I got nailed once in a UAW plant.. My company at the time sold custom equipment, I was there to supervise the installation of a manufacturing line and the union did the installing. One day an electrician asked me to hand him a screwdriver and another guy wrote it up. I should have known better but I’m pretty sure it was like a fraternity hazing thing.

 

It’s actually sad to know their BS (like that day) followed by striking caused them all to be unemployed, and we wonder why all these manufacturing jobs are moving to Asia??? 

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7 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

What a ridiculous requirement imposed by the

film company!  It is HIS car.

 

A good union member can always tell you the limitations of anything you do. An important contribution, sometimes.

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Sorry to be negative but although I have enjoyed the debate, it’s Looks like it’s dampened the original posters interest , no further input so far , makes me wonder 

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Be very carful when renting your car to a motion picture studio so you may think. Usually the car will go through a broker type of business who will re rent it to the studio. I found out the hard way when my car came back with no front seat cushion on a touring. I waited months to settle after many phone calls and promises.  Never again.  

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, Pilgrim65 said:

Sorry to be negative but although I have enjoyed the debate, it’s Looks like it’s dampened the original posters interest , no further input so far , makes me wonder 

 

If this little speed bump is enough to scare the OP off he's not gonna make it in the film industry anyway..........Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)
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Florida is is a "right to work" state.

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I was in the SEMA HOF with Pete Chapouris, until he passed away. GREAT GUY! (He was the "Pete," of Pete-n-Jakes" hot rod parts, and later the owner of So-Cal Street Rods). Anyway, Pete built and owned the 34 Ford coupe that was used in the movie, "California Kid," featuring Martin Sheen and Vic Morrow. Pete told me that he really enjoyed sitting around the movie sets all day, and hobknobbing with the actors, etc. But all he really got out of the loaning the car to the movie producers was free food, the right to hang around the sets, and lots of scratches, dust, dirt, and small dents in his beautiful car. 

 

This was a long time ago, of course. 

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I leased out my 1941 Cadillac for a Joe Pesci film called The Public Eye (my only terms were insurance as my company would not cover, that I be there to instruct anyone driving and a trip around block with me in car to get familiar with it,  nothing sprayed on the paint, and "extra care"). I found bum sleeping in the car on the second day of filming, so I stuck my extra keys in the ignition and removed the car (ie no vagrants in my custom ordered from new original white wool interior).  The film company called and raised quite a fuss - they had to re-shoot a day due to their carelessness (I am a better attorney). There was a Lincoln K Limousine in the film - it had its rear door ripped off, tore up the rear body an rear fender, and destroyed the interior (and another car damaged as well). And, ...

 

Sidenote: A few people over the years have said I should be a transportation manager as I know how to take care of a car.

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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Years ago, there was a movie made in eastern Pennsylvania based on the book “Birch Interval”. My 1941 Dodge pickup was involved. It was paid $25/day and I was paid $19/day to drive it. The movie starred Rip Torn, Eddie Albert, others — including, of course — me. The movie bombed, and the movie careers of my truck and me were destroyed on the spot. I’m convinced the movie failed because both my truck and I were cut from the final version. :)

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Just make sure you get a contract and have a lawyer look over it. I read about some gentleman renting out his '36 Lincoln Sedan and got it back with the hood and roof crushed. He later found out that 20 or so cheerleader's were positioned on the car for a team photo. I don't know if it's worth the aggravation.

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My impression is that lending your car to a film company is driven by pride and ego with the expectation the film crew shares those values. 

The reality is the director and crew is driven by production and profit motive. Most movie props are seen as one use disposibles. Your car is a prop and that,s the mid set it,s surrounded by.........bob

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11 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

My impression is that lending your car to a film company is driven by pride and ego with the expectation the film crew shares those values. 

The reality is the director and crew is driven by production and profit motive. Most movie props are seen as one use disposibles. Your car is a prop and that,s the mid set it,s surrounded by.........bob

I watched a movie starring that guy that used to be married to Jennifer Garner, he got angry in one scene and pounded the roof of an early 50s Buick and dented it. Actors are out of their mind especially when filming and have only one goal. That goal has no consideration for the scene props. 

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Movie people would say those car people don't understand the demands of our craft.

 

Car people would say those movie people don't understand the demands of our craft.

 

That older comedian has a lot of old cars. He would probably be the best source.

 

My Son has a degree in movie production and when he was around 10 years old The Godfather complemented him on knowing how to close the door on a 1930's classic car. There are anomalies, maybe old car guys breed them. Always ask for the producer's and actor's lineage.

 

Bernie

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