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Jeff P

1950 Nash Convertible

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It is a Rambler, but still a Nash Rambler in 1950.

 

There were no full size Nash convertibles in 50. The Ambassador was indeed an OHV big six. The Statesman (AKA the 600 in 49), had a small flathead six similar if not identical to the Rambler. The Ambassador had a longer nose to accommodate the longer engine.

 

But enough about the big Nashes, this isn't, it is the small Nash, and is about the size of a Studebaker Lark or a Hudson Jet.

 

It is not really a convertible in the way we expect. The frames around the windows and door stay up, and the canvas top slides back,on rails as seen on some 60s Volkswagens, Fiat 600s, etc...

 

I think there was a yellow one on the cover of Mechanix Illustrated when they first came out. Tom McCahill probably tested it.

 

The six is tiny, maybe 151 cubic inches or so. It is extremely short, about the length of a Jeep 4 cylinder. They idle so smooth and quiet it is hard to tell if the engine is running. I had a 51 Statesman with a 3 speed and overdrive, and that made the little engine very usable even in a full size car.

 

All Nashes of this period are unibodies. Rust could be structural and more difficult than a "normal" car to fix, so look it over good. 

 

Edit: just saw the footwell in the pics. That isn't going to be easy to fix. Not impossible, but tougher than it probably looks.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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The seller says his car is "rare."  That's a relative term.

 

I've seen nicely restored versions of this same model.

If your budget allows, you'll surely be ahead if you buy

a nice one.

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6 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

The seller says his car is "rare."  That's a relative term.

 

I've seen nicely restored versions of this same model.

If your budget allows, you'll surely be ahead if you buy

a nice one.

For $2000 or less, if the seller would take a lower offer, a little time & maybe another thousand or so, you would have a somewhat unique driver. I would think you would get a lot of attention at cruises with that top opened up.

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Do a search for "1950 Nash" and you'll find dozens of interesting things like this original video of a TV commercial for one. Good luck....

 

 

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Rattle proof…..

I like that claim.

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I kind of look for different.  This is different.  As Lebowski noted, one can google these cars.  Interesting back story.  Nash-Mason-Romney decided to only make this convertible for the 1st year. 9000 of them.   Seems they did some market research and did not want to make a perception wise "cheap" car.

so, at 9000 + made, these were not rare, depending on your definition of rare.  I assumed that Nash made 2-3 different models of Rambler the 1st year, not just one "halo" model.  Kind of gutsy.  Having said that, MOST that are left are either restored or in this condition. 

This is not necessarily an attractive car, right. It's kitschy, which is a word to describe cute or interesting to collect when the car is simply not a tour de force styling wise.   Might be fun to restore with low expectations.  I know Hudson and even Nash I believe were unit bodies.  IF this car is a Unibody, then I would say don't even start, looking at that floor.


I do find it interesting it seems to wear it's original green paint, in spots.

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Gee, with feedback like the above, why would anyone want a Nash?  You guys are a tough crowd.   If it had a VW badge on the front it would be priced five time higher or more.  9,000 not rare?   If it was a Mustang, 9,000 of any model would be rare.   

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Don't forget that in addition to Google, you can also go to "Google Images". There you'll see pics of this homely/cute little Nash in different colors and see lots of pics of Lois Lane and her Rambler from the "Superman" television series.

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A couple of clarifications here:

 

Indeed, this is a 1950 Nash Rambler Custom Convertible. The convertible was the first bodystyle introduced for the 1950 model year but a two-door wagon joined the lineup about halfway through the year.

 

The engine is Nash's 173 cubic inch flathead six, introduced in the 1941 Ambassador 600. Nash and AMC stuck with variations on this engine right through the end in '88. It is indestructible and efficient.

 

This, like all Nashes of the period (though not Hudsons) is a true unibody using only sheet metal gussets to form the structure. As such, rust is a killer. It's possible this car is salvageable but it's a project for a skilled metal worker. That being said, they are not at all common. 9000 produced may not be "rare" but there aren't many survivors. 

 

I'd suggest anyone with interest in this car to seek out the Nash Car Club of America. There are several enthusiastic owners of first generation Ramblers that would be happy to give you pointers!

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20 hours ago, pacerman said:

Gee, with feedback like the above, why would anyone want a Nash?  You guys are a tough crowd.   If it had a VW badge on the front it would be priced five time higher or more.  9,000 not rare?   If it was a Mustang, 9,000 of any model would be rare.   

Pacerman:

I don't see a lot of bashing of this car.  I learned a while back, 9,000 is not rare. It's fine that they made that many, and it surely is rare and rarely seen in this day and age, but 9,000 is a lot.  When you also consider I suspect these were largely unchanged in their 1st few years, then that means even less rare.

 

By Kitschy I mean the styling is suspect.  It was based as you know - off the Airfoil styling concept that Nash went all in on in I believe 1949.  I am just one that prefers the different over the Fords, Chevys, and Plymouths.  I like Kaiser and Frazers, for instance.  I have owned a 49 Hudson Commodore.  So I would consider buying this for several reasons.

1. It's a small platform purchased cheaply (if someone buys it) that can be done in my garage.  So many cars from this era are huge, and the idea of doing an extensive restoration at my age means I will likely pass.

2. Parts are fairly inexpensive - those you can get from Kanter's and so on. I am sure that small straight 6 is well supported.

3. Club support - mentioned above. 

4. Won't be seen at many or in my case probably any car shows. 

 

Restore it the best you can, get some help where you can't and enjoy the heck out of it while informing local show crowds what the heck it is.

 

But -
The rust in the one photo is an issue which some potential buyers may not know is part of the structure of this car, and Nashes and Hudsons in general.  If I were to restore a car like this, I like to remove the body and have easy access to the frame.  It allows you to build the frame a lot easier than from underneath - think new brakes, motor access, wiring.  And you can work on the body and interior separately.  I am not sure you can do any of that on this car. You would probably want to leave it as is, remove the front clip, yes, but a welder is going to have to improvise to remove and replace that rust, and rust which is likely further back. 

 

I could go on, but the bottom line is when I saw it pop up on CL I knew I wanted to share it with the greater AACA community, and I knew I did not know much about it.  I know more now thanks to the accumulated knowledge here. 

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