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broken distributor cap


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I have a new distributor cap for a 1930's Packard that I stupidly dropped off the table.  When it hit the ground it broke into several pieces. Oh well.  It happens sometimes.

 

But has anyone found a glue or some other method to repair a cracked or broken distributor cap so it won't arc? 

I hate to give up on it without trying something.

 

Thanks -- Luke

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Look at Amazon for The Last Glue, I've had very good luck repairing broken tool housings with it,  I used it to glue bakelite  dist. cap for a 1930 Chrysler. Not a cheap glue, about $30 an ounce. How much is a new cap?

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You can TRY to glue it back together, but I'd lay another cap in, and use this repaired one as a spare.  For the internal cracks/repair lines, you need to seal them.  I've had good luck with cracked rare caps, again on the inside, by opening the crack with a dental pick, Dremel-drilling each end of crack or repair to stop propagation, then laying on five coats, one day apart, of epoxy fingernail polish (color not important on the inside). 

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Right, typically a crack in a distributor cap collects carbon dust from the arc and the carbon center terminal wear. If you smooth the  crack so it isn't there, carbon can not lay in the line and cause a short. Same on outside to keep dirt out of crack that also may be conductive. 

 

Glue, smooth both sides and give it a try.

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9 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Right, typically a crack in a distributor cap collects carbon dust from the arc and the carbon center terminal wear. If you smooth the  crack so it isn't there, carbon can not lay in the line and cause a short. Same on outside to keep dirt out of crack that also may be conductive. 

 

Glue, smooth both sides and give it a try.

Smooth it yes, but don't sand it. Sanding scratches will do the same as leaving the cracks unfilled. They can collect and contribute to carbon tracking. Fill and smooth it with cut-to-fit pieces of thin cardboard, manila folder, or business card stock, to fill and level the glue in the crack.

 

And stay away from fast cure epoxies. The faster they cure the sooner they let go. Slow cure marine grade epoxies are the best for strength and longevity.

 

Paul

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