roadmaster29

Questions on 1926 Buick

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I am looking at a 1926 Buick and the previous owner told me that when he purchased the car it had an electric fuEl pump. Shortly after he got the car the carb started to leak gas. He then put on a new pump with a restricted to have it stop at a certain pressure. It is still leaking now from between the bowl and the top of the carb. Is this something that can be fixed fairly easily or not. I think I'd the carb can be repaired or replaced then I would probably repair the vacuum tank so it's correct so that cost will be involved also. The car is very close to me and was bought by a dealer in Texas but I have been talking to the man in South Dakota Thanks for any information. I haven't been to look at the car because of the gas issues

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roadmaster 29

These are a very simple carb.  They are designed to run at a very low pressure,  But saying this,  many people successfully run their cars with fuel pumps.  This is a pic of a 1920 carb,  but the 26 is basicaly the same.  It may be as simple a putting in a new cork float.  The float lever may be worn,  causing  the float valve to stick.  If it was me I would remove and service the carb  after buying the car  anyway.  The 26 has a heat riser which has an internal tube that develops pin holes  over time.  This does not cause flooding but severely  affects the running of the engine,  also the air valve may not be closing properly.  There are topics on this Forum  discussing these issues 

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Roadmaster 29,

    The existing needle and seat can really only handle the head pressure of the liquid level that is in the vacuum tank.  About 1 PSI.  Some have used a fuel pump and regulator, but most seem to just put the vacuum tank back into service.  A needle valve that leaks past will overcome even a working float.  Either way, it does not sound like the seller is going to have this fixed, so pay accordingly for a non running car and the risk you take in buying a non running car, but a fairly easy fix when you get in to it.  

Hugh

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