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AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


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The water pump shaft and its components are ready to be drilled and set in place.  You have heard me say before that the early Light Six pump assembly is altogether different than what evolved in the 1920's.  I hope the one photo will put that into perspective as to what I am talking about.  The material in the shaft is a stainless grade that has high wear resistance characteristics.  The long, straight portion of the shaft was ground between centers and ended up with an RMS 5 - 6 finish.  When I machined the new packing nuts I paid close attention to the inside surface finish.  I wanted it to be as smooth as possible so as to slip and slide on the graphite impregnated cording.  Since this engine was built in the calendar year of 1915, that technically makes it a Brass Era vehicle.  With that thought in mind I simply could not put things back together without polishing out the Brass components.  I know that there are some out there that have gone to the effort, time, and expense to modernize the seals on these old pumps.  I am a huge fan of technology when it can be put to use to really improve a problem area.  However, I am 'Old School' about this pump.  Buick simply built millions of these pumps without any problems and I figure my pump will work just fine the way that I am putting it back together.  A person has to keep in mind that this is a non-pressurized cooling system and if it worked back then - it will work like it is supposed to now.  The ring at the end of the shaft is what is called an 'Oldham' coupling.  This allows for a slight mismatch between the centers of two shafts running together.  Things truly are starting to come back together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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And you don’t want the nuts and gland surfaces too polished as they need to fix and hold the packing in place so the packing does not rotate when the shaft rotates. 
 

You want the relative motion between the packing (fixed) and the moving shaft. 

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Brian,

The tapers in the pump housing and pump housing cover will hold the packing in place so that it can do its job.  With regard to the timing - Tighe Halloway and I talked about that at length after we got the engine home.  He used the marks on the crankshaft gear and the camshaft gear to establish proper valve timing.  He did not put the timing gear cover on permanently because I told them not to.  I will need to bring the water pump shaft in from the front when I set things back together.  At that time I will double check the timing marks on the gears to make sure of the proper valve timing.  This will also give me the opportunity to grease the gearset for final assembly.  Why Buick did not do something of a more positive identification for the flywheel indexing is beyond me.  I also am not going to install the tapered pin in the starter / generator drive coupling until everything is in place.  I have confidence that everything will fall into place as planned.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I got the roller lifter assemblies all greased and put back together and ready to install into the upper crankcase.  Ya gotta love it when things start going back together.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

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Early this afternoon I went to work installing the roller lifter assemblies into the upper crankcase.  This has been a long time in the works getting to this point.  I'm taking the starter / generator unit up to the shop in the morning to get things figured out how the setup needs to be to drill the shaft for the impellor and the drive coupling.  This is really starting to get fun watching these parts and pieces go back together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The water pump/generator shaft will have the drive coupling drilled for the tapered pin this afternoon.  Everything is fitting together perfectly.  I still have some prep work on the pump housing and end cover to finish up before the impellor goes on the shaft and gets made up permanent.  I had originally thought about using two set screws to stake the impellor to the shaft.  I have decided to use just one stainless screw and use the Blue Threadlocker on it. (could be removed at a future point if necessary)  This is the most complicated area in setting this engine back together and it has to be perfect or the problems will never end.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Beautiful Doo Dah

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Terry, 

      The original design to hold the impellor is a set screw into the shaft for locating purposes.  Then a second hole is made that is a drill thru.  The drill thru is then reamed with a taper and they used a taperd pin with a split on the end to prevent it from coming out.  OK to change this design, but I think you need a mechanical means to hold things in place, and you need something that runs thru the shaft and not just against it-unless you penetrated the shaft by some amount.  You could do a thru bolt and lock nut, or stake the nut.  Another option is a roll pin as it will have an interference fit.  I am concerned about blue loctite being at roughly 212 degrees F, and heat cycling, and would Mario Andretti do this?   You have some beautiful work going on there.   Hugh 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Hugh,

Thank you for the compliments.  I try awfully hard with this.  It just has to be as close to perfect as is humanly possible.  I will use a 1/4"-20 stainless set screw and go just a tad past half way into the shaft.  I am so positive that this engine will never run hot that I wouldn't even give that a thought.  Using the Blue Threadlocker will keep the possibility open for taking things apart if the need should ever arise (God forbid)  The Threadlocker is supposed to be good for a fairly high temperature - not sure what that is at the moment.  When I completely disassembled the engine I do remember that the water pump impellor was pinned to the shaft with a single tapered pin.  I whole-heartedly believe that this engine had never been opened up or worked on in any manner.  The guys at Abrahams have told me the same thing about the internals of the engine.  That's my story that I have to stick to. 

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The front floor boards are finally done with what I wanted to do with them.  The aluminum data tags are tacked into place where they should belong.  The complete water pump is ready to go back on the engine and the impellor work will be completed Monday morning.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Don,

The data plates are original to the car.  I really hate to brag on this old Buick, but, in my humble opinion, it was/is a very complete, untouched, and original automobile.  For a 1916 D-45 I am aware of only one other car that is a better original than this one.  That car belongs to my friend, Bill Krause, out in New Jersey.  I was able to spend some time with Bill and Jeanne back in the Summer of 2016.  He told me then that the car that they have had spent almost 75 years in dry storage and that he believes the 1,200 miles showing on the odometer is accurate.  All that he is doing is taking it apart and cleaning it up and setting it back together.  Bill was very gracious in loaning me the original side curtains from this car to use as visual patterns when we had the new top put on the car.  Here is a photo of a Buick shift pattern plate that I got from a fellow down in Texas probably 20 - 25 years ago.  It is Aluminum and I think it is more than likely a reproduction from an original.  The late Dave Chambers told me that these were put in cars by the dealers way back in the day.  I had it polished out and relief painted to dress it up a bit.  I think it came out pretty well for a period accessory that relates to 105 years ago.  Thank you for your compliment.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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That shift pattern plate is a new one to me and really great. Switching from the '18 to the '38's makes you think a bit when shifting.

 

The plates on my car show their age and use and I'm OK with that - it is a used car

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That plate is very cool.  I don’t have one for my 22 but I did buy the reproduction shift ball with the pattern on it because it will be tough to get used to.

 

 

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I am hoping that I can get the water pump impellor located on the shaft tomorrow and have it ready for drilling and tapping.  This has really turned into a project at this point.  The timing case cover needs to come off so that the shaft can be moved forward to remove the housing body from the shaft.  The whole engine will have to be suspended from the cherry picker so that the front cover can be removed.  The front cover incorporates the front engine mount so that really presents a problem with it setting in the transport cradle as is shown in the photos.  We'll get it done though and then the complete water pump shaft assembly will be installed once the engine is back in the frame.  The cherry picker will be traded for the floor jack so that the front cover can be removed and re-installed.  I'm at the point where Mark is right now with being on the jazz about things coming together.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Beautiful Weather Doo Dah

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The water pump impellor has been staked to the shaft and all of the work for and on this assembly is complete save for setting it all back together for the last time.  I hope to get the engine back home to the shop on Thursday.  It's getting closer.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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EUREKA!  The engine is back home and there is much joy out in Doo Dah.  It is exactly one day shy of one year and two weeks since we dropped the engine off in Davenport.  Now I can get the arrangements made for my helpers and this baby will be back home in the frame.  Stay tuned for the updates.

 

Terry Wiegand

Way Out in Doo Dah

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Posted (edited)

I got the yard-work all done up yesterday so that I could start working on the engine this morning.  I put the cages in the back cylinder before the engine goes back into the frame.  I did this because the back end of the block is pretty close to the firewall and I wanted to be able to have freedom of movement for the long handles on the cage nut tool.  So far, everything is going back together perfectly.  My cage nut tool and long handles has really worked out well.  One thing that I forgot to mention earlier is that having the manifolds off lets me look into the ports and make sure that the cage ports are positioned in the center of the block ports.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

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Edited by Terry Wiegand
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (see edit history)
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We had a pretty nice day here, so, I'm going to do what I can until the order from Restoration Supply gets here.  I'm waiting on High Head Hex Machine Bolts that will be much easier to change out this way than once the engine goes back into the frame.  I got the timing case tags put in place.  I got these identical reproduction tags from Jeff Marshall down in New Zealand.  In fact my friend, Keith Townsend in North Carolina got a set from Jeff at the same time I got these for his D-45.  I took photos of the old tags so that I would be sure to get the new ones back in the right position.  I guess Buick wanted the service people to be able to read the tags from the engine side of the radiator.  Every little bit keeps things moving forward.  Late yesterday morning I got the cowl and to the back side of the front doors polished out and ready for waxing.  A person can tell that the body was finished with a brush, but, it came out pretty well thank you.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,  could you provide contact details for jeff Marshall  in NZ , Google is only finding a motor cycle dealer ? Thanks Norm

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I got the rocker post assemblies out this afternoon and made sure that they were fully greased and ready for installation when that time comes.  I'm waiting on bolts from Restoration Supply and for the rain to finally stop.  I want to put the new oil pan bolts in while the engine is still out of the frame.  It will be so much easier that way.  I'm getting there - just not fast enough to suit me.  I am not ashamed to tell anyone that putting this engine back into the frame has me a little bit on edge.  Experience has taught me that things always come apart easier than they go back together.  I learned that real early helping my Dad with his 2-Cylinder John Deere restorations.  We're not gonna worry too much about it though.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

... I am not ashamed to tell anyone that putting this engine back into the frame has me a little bit on edge.  Experience has taught me that things always come apart easier than they go back together.  I learned that real early helping my Dad with his 2-Cylinder John Deere restorations. 

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Terry,

This is exactly what I needed to hear today for ‘Fifteen maybe twenty thousand’ reasons — and the reason why I’m paying shop rate for all of this being done on mine.

I simply lack the experience (or time). Holy cow, just trying to keep the con-rod shims in order I accidentally bumped one and the darned thing stuck to a tiny dab of oil on my clumsy thumb. No idea which pile it came from.

*ring ring ring*

That and the Jesus Rings that came popping out of the manifold when I pulled it away from the engine....

 

I think a lot of us are more anxiously awaiting your engine to go back together than you are.

Good luck,

Ben P.

Edited by Ben P.
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Ben,

Thank You for the compliments.  I try really hard to get this exactly right.  The goal is to run the wheels off this car with touring once it has been all sorted out.  A lot of folks haven't got the slightest idea just how much fun an open car can be.  Next month this old Buick will start on 58 years of being in my family and I was 15 years old the first time my Dad let me drive it.  I was instantly hooked and it hasn't gone away since.  The rain needs to be turned off - we have had way more than our share in the last week.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Rain-Soaked Doo Dah

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I got just a little bit more done today.  The valves are in place for #1 and #2 cylinders and #5 and #6.  I will install the last 4 valves once the engine is back in the frame.  I want to leave those out so that the hoist sling will not cause any problems with them.  The Nickel Plated, original breather caps are back in place.  In the one photo the new High Head Hex Machine Bolts in the oil pan can be seen.  I chased the threads on the cone clutch studs in the flywheel and the last thing I have left to do is install the crankcase oil drain spigot and thread it in.  Once that is done it is call my helpers and get the cherry-picker ready.  This has been a long time coming to get to this point.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

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On 11/24/2019 at 11:45 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:
My 1925 Buick Standard recently started running very poorly.  About 400 miles on the car.  Leaving me stranded.  Would not restart.  Started needing the choke pulled during cranking even after being warmed up, then quickly push it in.  If it would not start, it required a shot of starting fluid.  Fortunately it died near a Walmart the first time it died.   I have been carrying a can of starting fluid with me since. 
 
I checked dwell, timing, replaced the plugs since they were black, saw arcing in the plug wires - changed them.  Saw cracks in the distributor cap - changed it.  Ran slightly better but only after turning the air valve in a few turns and turning the throttle stop screw in so it ran with more throttle opening to keep from stalling.
 
In the end, still, it would not start after being turned off without a quick shot of starting fluid.  The carburetor would start flowing gas on to the ground when I stopped cranking.  A 6" diameter puddle of gas.  I decided that I wanted to check the needle and seat.  I also wanted to use a mirror to see if the venturi pot metal block had grown and was not letting the air valve close,    
 
I removed the lower brass float section of the carburetor.  Turning it upside down and sucking on the fuel inlet, no air was going thru, so the needle and seat were working well.  
 
I used a mirror and looked up into the bottom of the updraft carburetor.  The air valve was not moving to the opposite wall.  When I unscrewed the air valve adjuster,  the marvel spring inside was very rusty.  It was clean 6 months ago.  The rust had also gone between the barrel of the air valve screw and the air valve plunger.  This caused the air valve to either move very slowly or stay in one place.  I cleaned up the rusty spring and cleaned all the rust flakes out of the spring and piston area.  I cleaned up the spring on the wire wheel and did a quick tin zinc plate on it using my home plater.  
 
Everything works well again.  The only time it needs a choke is briefly on a cold start.  Any other time, just turn on the ignition and push the starter. It starts immediately.  I set the throttle screw back where it was.  As before, if I set the timing on full retard, the engine will lope at 375 RPM.  Sweet music.  I need to soak this spring in vinegar for a few days and then plate it again to do a better plating job, but long term I do need to find a replacement spring.  Also to others to inspect that spring in the air valve as it needs good plating on it.  
 
I fixed it just in time to be able to take my car thru our local "Festival of lights" parade.  It ran great.  The crowds loved the Ahooga horn.  
Hugh  
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Hugh, That car has come a long way and looks Fantastic!

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I spent some time this afternoon at my local 'long time' parts shop looking through their Brass fuel fittings.  I think I found what I am going to use on the vacuum tank fuel shutoff fittings.  One of the these will go on the 1916 and I will retro-fit the other one on the 1920.  I am finding out that some of these fittings are getting a bit hard to come by these days.  This is going to work well with the Copper line feeding the carburetor.  By the way, the engine is going back into the frame on Saturday. I will be posting photos of that.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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There is extreme joy out in Doo Dah on this Saturday morning.  The engine is back in the frame and I would have never thought that it would have went so smooth.  I hooked onto the engine with the hoist and 15 minutes later it was all done and over with.  The two guys in the photo are my son-in-law and his good friend.  I could not have done this without their help.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah America

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Well, Terry has his engine back in and the new timing gear has been reinstalled in my 1925 Standard Beulah.

DSCF8147.thumb.JPG.04e0c02352401ac32c923c72aa62b847.JPGThings are looking up.

 Friday night Beulah started right up after all was reassembled and timed. Now today to reinstall the radiator and hood so we can go for a ride!

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12 minutes ago, dibarlaw said:

Well, Terry has his engine back in and the new timing gear has been reinstalled in my 1925 Standard Beulah.

DSCF8147.thumb.JPG.04e0c02352401ac32c923c72aa62b847.JPGThings are looking up.

 Friday night Beulah started right up after all was reassembled and timed. Now today to reinstall the radiator and hood so we can go for a ride!

 

What did you use for a replacement timing gear, aluminum or original?  Hard to tell from the picture... 

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Don:

I have an all fiber one from "Then and Now". I did have to make a spacer since there is no metal hub. The very nice full tooth original I had as a spare had several teeth showing fractures.

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Posted (edited)

I finished getting all of the valve cage assemblies and rocker posts installed this morning.  I removed my 'shop aid' frame spreader and the body has been bolted back down on the frame.  Raising the whole body about an inch and a half at the firewall was just the ticket to slip the engine back into the frame.  Removing the steering column was most helpful also.  Hopefully things will be a lot easier going back together.  I slipped the NOS AC Titan Spark Plugs in just to get an idea what they will look like when installed for good.  This is really getting to the fun part of this rebuild.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

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Edited by Terry Wiegand
GRAMMAR (see edit history)
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32 minutes ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Removing the steering column was most helpful also. 

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

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I'm not even sure how anyone gets an engine in or out without removing the column.  Especially if the column and engine are detailed.  There just isn't enough room on my 27.

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16 minutes ago, Ben P. said:

Mine stayed in, but it’s a different kind of animal....

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Still looks tight there... Did you have to swing the block around the column box? 

 

If I tried to swing my engine to the side, I would run into something for sure. 

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