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I really like the unassuming period approach to this visibility issue.

How about this for a conglomeration of original parts for brake and turn signals. This 1924-45 re-restored by a Mr. DeFrancis used 1924-1926 tail lights and modern lenses to replace the single rear tail to be centered in the tire carrier. He did this because he used the double spare carrier and tire cover. Quite an interesting retrofit. I was high bidder for this car at the auction and it was a no sale at my $21,000 bid. Comments at the time were that they went thru PEP BOYS with a magnet because of all the accessories tacked on.DSCF1839.thumb.JPG.f445c6d620050fefd10f1dbb6ccc8385.JPGDSCF1840.thumb.JPG.f463bd34635fe052909c85a815122f00.JPG

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This was the car before the re-restoration in red. Already pretty well accessorized. Bumpers, driving lights, fender mounted mirrors, dual chrome horns, wind wings and a Tounneu  windshield. All bright work was chromed.

 

Edited by dibarlaw
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I like your set up Terry.  Because of the symetry, you could easily set that up as regular turn signals, dual brake lights, and have emergency flashers.   I would wire the cowl lights for dual filaments as well.  Here is the posting where myself and others have added the flasher unit and some tail light options.   There are special bulbs for the shallow housings that are dual filament 6 volt.  Normal dual filament bulbs are taller than single filament bulbs.  Mac's Ford has the short dual filaments.  Then you get into the offset pins on the bulbs vs opossed pins.  I just file off one of the pins.  I spent a bit of time making my lights work in my existing housings since you have to change to a dual filament contact plate from a single center type.  Restoration Stuff and Rhode Island wire have the parts to create dual filament bases for the lamps to plug in to.    I strongly encourage people to have emergency flasher capability as people are not used to seeing cars broken down on the side of the road or in the road anymore.     Hugh 

 

https://forums.aaca.org/topic/337486-turn-signal-addition/?tab=comments#comment-1969695

 

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We have some beautiful weather going on out here in Doo Dah.  It was 62 degrees yesterday and I pulled the Pittman Arm off the steering gear shaft.  My son-in-law is coming over after work this afternoon to help take the steering gear out of the frame.  It's hard to be on both sides of the firewall at the same time.  I removed the drag link and arm for a clean up.  This brought back a lot of memories for me from when I helped my Dad clean up the whole front end.  It was around Thanksgiving of 1963 and I was the designated washer of the parts for that project.  All I'm having to do this time is just clean things up real good and fresh grease the connections.  I'm getting the water pump shaft and all of the parts associated with that together for when the engine comes back home.  I am very happy with the way that shaft turned out.  I will be posting more photos as we move along.

 

Terry Wiegand

Medicine Man for Buick's 1916 Model D-45

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, this is the day that I have been waiting for for almost a year.  We are leaving tonight and heading up to Davenport, Iowa to bring the engine back home.  Barbara's work schedule and another issue held us back from going up sooner.  We just want to get up there and back home before things get any crazier in the country.  I am going to get photos while we are there and I am sure that there will be a lot to talk about after we get back home.  As Ol' Willie sings about - we'll be On The Road Again!

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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There is good news to report from Doo Dah.  The rebuilt engine is back home.  We had a very safe trip going both ways.  Ran in the rain going up and a lesser amount of rain coming home.  Before we left I went to our one paint store and got two 9 X 11 plastic drop sheets.  These were put over the engine and shrink wrapped profusely.  I then got a 9 mil heavy tarp from Harbor Freight and this wrapped everything up very snug.  The photo shows the engine setting in the back of my truck and I think that it is going to be there for several days.  The weather forecast is calling for rain at least every other day for the next 10 days to 2 weeks.  The important thing is that it is back home safely and when the opportunity is right it will be going up to my friends machine shop for cylinder block painting and getting the water pump / starter / generator shaft ready for final installation.  My truck is filthy from the trip and that needs to be taken care of also.  I will post more photos as we go along.  I have waited almost a year to get to this point, so I guess a few more days won't hurt anything.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Daw Way

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There has been discussion in another thread about what to use during the initial start- up of this engine and what to use for the break-in oil.  Dave sent me home with this Clevite Cam Lube to use on the camshaft and lifter rollers.  I am going to be using CHAMPION POWER SHIELD 30W BREAK-IN OIL.  THIS PRODUCT IS ZDDP ENHANCED.  He told me that I should run this in the crankcase for 200 miles after the initial start-up.  I was told that they have been using this product for years and have never had a problem.  That is good enough for me.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Here is information that Ross Pistons sent along with the new pistons.  This old engine definitely has some high-tech features in it now.  I had read about the gapless rings quite some time back and here they are in my engine.  Dave Mattison told me that my choice of Ross Pistons was excellent.  His words were something to the effect that they are the 'Cadillac' of pistons.

 

I need to make a correction here in regard to the piston rings used in this engine.  I was under the impression that 'gapless' rings were used.  After visiting further with the guys at Abraham's, I was told that regular rings were used on the pistons.  The gapless rings are used when going into a serious racing engine and compression is a major factor.  I am sorry for the confusion on that.  I want to be 100% factual in what I post on here.

 

Terry Wiegand

Way Out in Doo Dah

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Edited by Terry Wiegand
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While waiting out the weather so that I can unwrap the engine and get it out of my truck, I finished getting the rear seat footrest back in place.  Gary Martin of Goldfield Trim did the edging work on the Coco mat for me.  I can safely say that on the inside of the body from the back of the front seat on back things are in place and finished up.  All we can say at this time is Come On Sunshine!

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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While in Davenport, Iowa picking up the engine, there was a photo taken that shows everyone at Abrahams, but one, who was involved in this engine rebuilding.  Our good friends, the Metzgers, came down from Waterloo to see us and spend the rest of the day on Monday.  Those in the photo from left to right are - Dennis Dodd (he did the very delicate crankshaft grinding), Terry Wiegand, Barbara Wiegand (holding Miss Muggins the Wonder Pup), Paul Metzger, Barbara Metzger, and Dave Mattison (manager and owner of Abrahams Machine Service).  Tighe Halloway, who did all of the tear-down, cleaning, and final assembly on the engine could not be there that day.  To say that it was a learning experience with this rebuild would be a huge understatement.  The extremely talented and experienced folks at Abrahams deserve a great big Thank You for what they did with this project.  Now, if that Sun would just come out.

 

Terry and Barbara Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Since the weather is not cooperating very well at all, I gotta keep moving forward with this project.  I stripped the old linoleum off the running boards and have them ready for the new material to be glued on.  I found out a couple of days ago that the adhesive that came from Ace Hardware was no good.  I called the customer service number for the Henry Company and spoke with a good guy there who advised not to use the product because the product was older than the expiration date on the tub.  Got two, way newer tubs of the stuff and now I am in business.  Mark Kikta and I talked about our running boards last night and the purpose for the grooves on the bottom sides of the boards.  We are of the opinion that these grooves are in the boards to minimize cupping and warping of the wood from water on the roadway.  My Dad made these new running boards probably around 1964 or so.  It was time to replace the linoleum with new pieces.  Here are some photos of where I am at with this project right now.  I can go ahead and do this now and set them aside until it is time to set all of the sheet metal back on the car.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry :

 Since I talked with you the other night I did some garage clean up. I found some of the original 1924 or 1925 Running board moldings that came with my 1925 Model 45. Mr. Brough who redid my car in the 1960-70s had some parts from I assume a Model 51 Brougham. 

He replaced the moldings on my car with standard 1"wide aluminum angle. On the Masters of this era the molding surrounded the entire board with mitered corners. There is a full length outside section at 67 1/2" long. My running board moldings are 59 7/8" long. The model 45 is 120" WB. So that the longer molding came from a 128" WB car. I have the 4 end pieces and a couple of cut apart interior and out side lengths. The original ZINC moldings are 7/8" vertical and 3/4" across the top face with 4 grooves. I believe that when they were produced the molding was originally in one long piece. 90 degree V notches were punched out and the the molding was bent around a form.  Some of the end pieces show where they were bent and then broken off when they were removed while the opposite inside end had a nice clean miter cut.

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The inner molding was nailed on while the outer face has the stamped raised /countersunk holes for screws.

 My original aluminum door sills have this same detail of the stamped raised and counter sunk holes. The new reproductions just have the countersunk holes stamped in. 

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The screw holes are spaced 4 3/8" center to center. The end section spacing is 4 1/2".

Just for your information ….

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Larry,

Thank you for posting the photos.  I am of the opinion that Buick went to a ribbed moulding as things progressed.  I say that because I have not seen that style of moulding on the middle teens to early '20's cars.  Even though I was only 15 years old when my Dad got the car, there are some things that have stuck in my memory for all these years.  The metal trim on the front floor boards was most definitely Aluminum.  I remember telling my Dad that the running board trim looked exactly like the kitchen counter top trim in Gramma's house.  He laughed and said, "it sure does".   One thing that is noticeable in our photos is that the Aluminum trim on my running boards is quite a bit heavier than what I can see of the trim in your photo.  The one thing that I can say with certainty is that I am not 100% sure of anything that was happening with these cars back at that time.  It is my humble opinion that from 1915 to 1925 more changes and advancements took place in those years than before or after that period of time.  Our car is at the very end of the Brass Era.  Maybe that could account for some things.  I simply do not know all of the answers.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry, 

    I can't believe this, but this company is still in business.  L&L Antique and Custom Auto Trim.   I would love to support them because I have a 27 page catalog on running board trim that covers most makes from the 20's, so they have been in business a long time .  There are 2 pages regarding Buick.  Then I found their face book page, and I added a cleaned up version of the first mouldings information.      

Hugh

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Automotive--Aircraft---Boat/LL-Antique-and-Custom-Auto-Trim-1507174832693144/

 

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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I ordered my 1922 Running board mouldings from them last week.. Brad Landoll was very helpful and he is the Son who has taken over the business from his father.  His shipping for all parts was something like $30-40 compared to Bob's who wanted $150 just for the shipping.

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Hugh and All,

Well, isn't this just something else.  This supports my thinking about the ribbed moulding on the teens Buicks.  Thanks for making this information known and sharing with everyone.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Well, it's Tuesday and time for an engine progress update.  The weather finally cleared off yesterday afternoon and rain is out of the forecast for about 5 days.  I got the engine uncovered and up to my friend's machine shop.  I'm going to let it set for a few days and get temperature normalized so that the block can be painted.  After that, the water pump shaft gets machined for the pump impellor and the starter/generator coupling.  What I am going to say next should generate some comments.  After getting things completely uncovered and exposed to the light of day, I was really kinda shocked at the quality of the Aluminum castings that make up the crankcase and the oil pan.  This could not be seen until things were thoroughly cleaned up of 100+ years worth of caked on grease and oil.  To say that the surfaces in some places were 'ROUGH' would be a huge understatement.  How about you guys who have gone through these old engines before me.  What did you find when things were cleaned up?  Maybe I am being too picky here.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Ben, I just knew that that was going to be your comment☺️.  The engine is still in the transport 'cradle' and will have to stay that way until it is ready to go back into the frame.  A couple of places are impossible to photograph until the engine is hanging from the cherry picker.  I will ask you guys to bear with me for a little while and a lot of photos will be posted.  My previous comments have absolutely nothing to do with the rebuild by Abrahams Machine.  Those folks did an an absolutely wonderful job with the rebuild.  I was just taken aback by what was revealed when things were thoroughly cleaned up.  I hope that there are some foundry experts out there that can explain a few things that I see in the one casting.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Speaking of Running Boards and Floor Boards - here is a photo of the #1 board (directly in front of the front seat frame) with the finger thimble to gain access to the battery.  The Aluminum trim is anodized so it does not polish out to a high shine.  I took everything all apart and had a friend lightly polish the visible surfaces.  While the linoleum was bare I scrubbed it real good with floor cleaner and gave it a good two coats of Johnson's Floor Wax.  Before anyone asks, I haven't got a clue as to how or where the gouges in the back edge came from.  This rules this car out from ever becoming a trailer queen show car. (that means I won't be getting any plastic trophies with it).  I will post more floor board photos tomorrow.  My Dad was an absolute Master with a hack saw and file and the mitered corners in the trim shows just how good he was.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry, 

     I call that floor board a winner.  The scratches may be the part that is under your heel on the front seat, so that may go un noticed.  

 

On the Buick Standard, the wood sills angle back at 4 degrees.  I bet that is the same for your car.  The back seat is wider than the front.  So the miters are not 45 degree miters.  If you use a protractor you can get the angles right that it takes.  You just have to really think about the angles on the floor boards (not the toeboard).  Same with cutting the wood.     Hugh 

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Here is a photo of Floor Board #3.  There is one more to go and I hope to finish it up tomorrow.  Board #4 is somewhat complicated with several small trim pieces and the accelerator pedal bracket.  Once these boards are cleaned up, waxed, and ready for placement when appropriate, I want to get back on the running boards and get them finished up.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The floor boards have all been cleaned, waxed, and the trim moulding put back in place.  The two halves of trim that go around the starter pedal will have to wait until the board is in place before they can be re-installed.  The little Aluminum data tags need to be put back in place.  Once that is done, I can pronounce the floor boards project finished.  I am sure someone is going to say something about the appearance of the linoleum on this last board.  I see it also and the only explanation that I can come up with is that this board is the closest to the heat of the engine and possibly repeated cycles of heating up and cooling down have caused some discoloration.  The linoleum has only been on these boards for over 50 years.  I guess they cannot be expected to stay perfect looking forever and drive the car at the same time.  This is the second board that is attached to the body framework with screws and that is the reason for the drilled hole in each end.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Edited by Terry Wiegand
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Rod,

They were new a little over 50 years ago😀.  This car has had a very sheltered existence since 1963 that I know about.  My thinking is to make it as nice as possible and try real hard to keep it that way as long as I can and at the same time drive the wheels off it.  I'm going to start on the engine next week.  I'll get the cylinder block painted and the machine work done for the water pump shaft and then it should be ready to go back into the frame.  A lot of photos will be forthcoming.  Rod, it looks like your linoleum could use a little hard wax on it - lol.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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A quick update with photos coming tomorrow.  The cylinder block now has two coats of Early Buick Green paint on it.  It took about three hours to do the two coats and just about that long to do the masking.  I'm not really ready to jump back into another paint project like this any time soon.  I got the paint from Bill Hirsch and it is really good paint, but, that brush really drug hard on that cast iron surface.  I think things turned out really well as you will see tomorrow.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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As promised, here are some photos of the painted cylinder block.  One thing that I did was to replace the old 1/2" - 20 Hex Nuts that hold the block to the crankcase with new Grade 5, Black Oxide ones.  I am really pleased with how this turned out.  Now, it's on to the water pump shaft.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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