Jump to content

AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


Recommended Posts

Here is the last photo that shows how the gauge body attaches to the dash panel.  The thicker brass nuts are really going to make for a much easier re-assembly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1240718.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The sight gauge is back in the dash panel where it belongs.  I did not tighten the hex nuts and will not do that until the lines between the dash and firewall are seated in place as they should be.  In my humble opinion, the polished brass gauge rim sitting next to the porcelain-faced accessory clock doesn't look all that bad.  I gotta keep telling myself that things are moving forward - no matter how small the steps might be.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1260719.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is another view of the dash panel with the oil gauge in place.  The hole in the dash board to the upper left of the steering column is where the choke tube  goes.  After the engine is back in the frame and the body is bolted back down permanently, I will take the Brasso to the steering column and polish it out and then it can be set back in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1260720.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

We had an absolutely beautiful day here this afternoon.  These are the oil lines that run from the back side of the firewall to the back side of the dash board.  I got these pieces all cleaned up (inside and out) and they are ready to be put back in place for the sight gauge.  Since these lines will not be visible, I decided that I would not polish them out.  The lines on the engine side of the firewall will be polished however.  Every little bit keeps the project moving forward.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2020725.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry;  Thanks for your posts.  I have a spinner sight gauge very similar to yours and today I tried to stop an annoying oil leak, instead I broke the glass when the glass hit the spinner before the ring felt tight.  I will get new glass cut, in the thinnest likely 1/16th", and I am using paper thin gaskets, maybe I could use thick gasket material?  My ring is new nickel so I polished the flat rear most surface with 400 grit sandpaper in case roughness was causing my leak.  I also ran a thread file to smooth out the threads and installed the ring with Teflon tape.  The ring was going on like a hot knife through butter when the glass snapped and ended my day.  Any thoughts?  Gary

Edited by cxgvd (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, cxgvd said:

Larry;  Thanks for your posts.  I have a spinner sight gauge very similar to yours and today I tried to stop an annoying oil leak, instead I broke the glass when the glass hit the spinner before the ring felt tight.  I will get new glass cut, in the thinnest likely 1/16th", and I am using paper thin gaskets, maybe I could use thick gasket material?  My ring is new nickel so I polished the flat rear most surface with 400 grit sandpaper in case roughness was causing my leak.  I also ran a thread file to smooth out the threads and installed the ring with Teflon tape.  The ring was going on like a hot knife through butter when the glass snapped and ended my day.  Any thoughts?  Gary

 

You should have the glass guy use 1/8" if possible so it doesn't break again, and have him use heat tempered glass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As of about 30 minutes ago, the sight gauge and its oil lines running through the firewall are back in place permanently.  I ordered these two 'service' wrenches to be able to tighten the fittings on the back of the gauge body.  Flare nut wrenches would not work. Regular open end wrenches would not work.  The hex nuts are very close together as can be seen in the one previous photo.  These wrenches turned out to be just the ticket.  During the disassembly there was no problems.  It was when things went back together that space presented a problem.  It all worked out great in the end.  I could write a book about some of the things that I have come up against.  I have wondered a thousand times just how some of this stuff was done back in the day on an assembly line situation.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2090727.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary,

I used a .040" diameter x 1.750" OD rubber o-ring for the gasket.  I got them from McMaster-Carr of all places. (I don't know what I'd do without those folks)  I will find out if my plan is going to work when the engine is fired up for the first time.  I am reasonably confident that the lens and thread-in lens holder will contain the hot engine oil.  There is low pressure coming off the pump, so, my thinking is that it will work OK.  I'll bet I find out in short order.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry;  I found a Boyce Motometer glass from the midget model was the same size as my old glass and was less than .015" thicker.  Yesterday I glued it to the ring with black silicone adhesive.  Let it set for 4 hours, cut a gasket from cork composite gasket material, 2 rounds of Teflon tape on the ring threads and re-installed the assembly.  Like you I have yet to start the engine so it will tested in combat.

 

I noticed in your photographs the oil lines are vertical, some time I see them mounted horizontally which leaves an ounce of hot, dirty oil in the bottom half of the sight gauge.  Why would anyone want that?

 

Thanks, and good luck, Gary

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gary,

You are right. In the body of the gauge the lines are vertical and when they exit the firewall they are horizontal.  I will try and get some more photos posted today.  The engineering back in the day was really quite impressive considering that Buick had only been in the automobile business a little over 12 years.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of the oil lines coming through the firewall.  I made new brass washers and hex nuts because I felt that they were on the too thin side to be reused again and do the job required of them.  The brass looks pretty good too.  It is really hard to know just where to stop on rebuilding things.  Maybe others have that dilemma too.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

P2100728.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of the firewall end of the oil lines that run down to the oil pump and the side of the oil pan.  As one can see from this photo these are the next things to be thoroughly cleaned and then polished out.  I am taking extra effort and precaution to make sure that all of the connections are good and solid so that there will not be any oil leaks anywhere along the lines.  These lines will be put back in place once the engine is back in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2100729.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

This took some doing to get photos from up under the dash so the oil lines and connections could be shown.  I believe that the connections are good and that there will not be any leaks from this area.  Shown here are the fittings going through the firewall and out into the engine area.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2100731.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We had another day in the low 60's that allowed for working outside.  I got the oil lines that run from the firewall fittings down to the bottom of the engine thoroughly cleaned inside and out and ready for polishing.  I am thinking that I will spend the better part of a whole afternoon with Brasso and 0000 steel wool on these two lines.  I'm thinking that they will polish out really nice.  Every little bit keeps things moving forward.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2160736.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

The shorter return oil line has had the polishing treatment given to it.  After about an hour and a half, 0000 steel wool, Brasso, and a lot of rubbing, you can see the end result.  I thought things turned out very well.  It's on to the next one.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2170738.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a not quite as warm as yesterday day, so, I got the sight gauge feed line polished out and temporarily set in place for a photo or two.  Now that that is done I think the next thing will be to get the speedometer swivel mounted and the cable hooked up to it and make sure that everything is good with that.  I am really pleased with the way these oil lines turned out.  I'm sure that they never looked this good even when the car left the factory.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2180741.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of the Speedometer Swivel that mounts on the front axle on the right wheel side.  It is a Stewart 2 1/2 : 1 drive.  Russ Furstnow down in Flagstaff went through this for me and it is ready to put in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2220743.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Here is a photo of the Speedometer Swivel that mounts on the front axle on the right wheel side.  It is a Stewart 2 1/2 : 1 drive.  Russ Furstnow down in Flagstaff went through this for me and it is ready to put in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2220743.JPG

 

.

Be careful torqueing the cable end on that pot metal, mine broke on me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave Mattison from Abrahams Machine Service called me about 2 hours ago to tell me that the engine is completely finished up and setting in the crate and ready to be picked up.  This is the day that we have been looking forward to for quite some time.  It will be after the Chickasha Swap Meet before we can get it back home.  I will post photos when we are up there getting it loaded.

 

Terry Wiegand

Medicine Man for Buick's 1916 Model D-45

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Dave Mattison from Abrahams Machine Service called me about 2 hours ago to tell me that the engine is completely finished up and setting in the crate and ready to be picked up.  This is the day that we have been looking forward to for quite some time.  It will be after the Chickasha Swap Meet before we can get it back home.  I will post photos when we are up there getting it loaded.

 

Terry Wiegand

Medicine Man for Buick's 1916 Model D-45

 

 Man, I would be on my way!  How can you wait?😄

 

  Ben

Link to post
Share on other sites

The next thing I want to get taken care of is the wiring for the second tail light and to be able to have brake lights for this car.  The spare tire carrier has the license plate / tail light bar in it for those purposes.  Cars built for the US market had left hand steering and the tail light mounted on the left side of the carrier.  Cars that were exported to the UK and Australia had right hand steering and the tail light mounted on the right side of the carrier.  The carrier bar had the holes punched in both sides, so, I figured I would mount a lamp housing on the right hand side and wire them both for brake light capability.  Little did I know that finding another one of these shallow lamp housings would almost turn out to be impossible.  I found one at Chickasha of all places and had both of them media blasted and painted.  Restoration Supply had the double contact bulb socket so that the brake light circuit could be added.  I have posted a photo to show just what these lamp housings look like.  I will build the wiring circuits and there is a company in Wichita that will braid the wiring for me.  I want to get this done while the whole car is about 18 inches higher than normal on the blocks - makes things a lot easier to move around that way.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P2280745.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That’s really going to look great Terry. Have seen a LOT of ‘solutions’ people have devised for a second tail lamp/stop lamp for 1918’s — none used one that matched the (single) factory provided one.

Here is the setup on my ‘18 4-cyl. (Top pic below). The fender mounted ‘stop’ light I assumed was period-aftermarket, but there’s at least one other ‘18 with the same exact lamp. (Bottom pic below - I forget who owns that well known car.)

Decent solution - doesn’t look out of place as a wart like most of them - not messing with it. Someone had a thread on here re. wiring in stop lamps for these pre-stop lamp cars, have been meaning to look at it and see how he set this one up - but I forget to look every time I’m out there. All I know is that it works. Am working on mounting that top-secret thing on the right. If it can’t mount to the frame -level with the factory lamp- I might not even use it.

D33366BC-C6E2-458D-831C-70FE84A7DFF5.jpeg

4701AB0A-F33B-4490-96CB-707059ABFB48.jpeg

Edited by Ben P.
Typo (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...