Jump to content

AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


Recommended Posts

I dug out the NOS Delco Distributor Cap and put the wire terminals on it it.  The cap is a really dark chocolate-colored Bakelite (darker than some that I have seen).  I made the high tension terminals out of a material called DuPont Vespel.  This is a cast resin material that we used at Cessna as a coupling between the air conditioning compressor and the drive shaft on Cessna Citation Jets.  The material withstands extremely high heat and has high die-electric strength.  I was able to buy some of this material as surplus from one of the stockrooms before I retired.  This stuff only costs $95.00 per linear inch and it machines beautifully.  I will try and get some photos tomorrow of the cap on the rebuilt starter/generator unit.  That piece will be all done and waiting for assembly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

PC070671.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

I dug out the NOS Delco Distributor Cap and put the wire terminals on it it.  The cap is a really dark chocolate-colored Bakelite (darker than some that I have seen).  I made the high tension terminals out of a material called DuPont Vespel.  This is a cast resin material that we used at Cessna as a coupling between the air conditioning compressor and the drive shaft on Cessna Citation Jets.  The material withstands extremely high heat and has high die-electric strength.  I was able to buy some of this material as surplus from one of the stockrooms before I retired.  This stuff only costs $95.00 per linear inch and it machines beautifully.  I will try and get some photos tomorrow of the cap on the rebuilt starter/generator unit.  That piece will be all done and waiting for assembly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

PC070671.JPG

 

 

WOW! Those are beautiful. Did you machine them yourself?

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloo,

Yes I did make these terminals myself.  I took the very best condition one of the originals and took all of the measurements from it and went from there.  It took me a little over two days (off and on) to do what you see in the photo.  They have a threaded brass insert in them and the threads are metric of all things.  I have made several sets for others and it was a lot of fun watching them come together in the end.  Thank you for your compliments.  Details done correctly are what makes a restoration stand out in my humble opinion.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a rather nice day going on here in Doo Dah (high in the upper 50's) and as promised, here are some photos with the cap/terminal assembly in place.  I'm sure everyone wanted to see things like they will be when they are back together.  Christmas times a comin' and I am having a hard time waiting on the engine!  More later.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

PC080672.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

Please do not feel like your questions, or anyone else's for that matter, are stupid or dumb.  This is the way we all teach each other and learn on here.  It has been between 7 and 8 years since I made these pieces.  My very good friend was living here in Hutchinson then and we did a lot of pretty fancy machine work for other car guys and ourselves.  He had a Bridgeport Milling Machine with a very nice Indexing Head for it.  I used that to mill the Hex flats before everything else was finished up.  I had to do that first because the body of the terminal below the hex has an ever-so-slight taper to it.  Originally, these Bakelite pieces like this were run through a squeeze molding process.  We just didn't happen to have one of those over in the corner of his shop, so we did the next best thing and machined them out of the Vespel cast resin stock.  So know you know, and I do think that they came out half swell.  

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

In the interest of keeping moving forward, I cut the gaskets for the headlight lenses this afternoon.  Barbara got this really slick gasket cutter for me for Christmas last year.  This was the first time using it and that thing is absolutely amazing.  The brand name is Olfa and she got it off Amazon.  The cutter wheel is razor sharp and then some.  The cork material is adhesive backed and I will put things together when the headlights go all together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

PC110678.JPG

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Some good news to relate.  I spoke with Dave Mattison at Abrahams in Davenport this afternoon.  The newly poured Babbitt bearing shells were delivered to them yesterday.  That really is good news at this point.  There is a fellow out in Northern California who recently joined Dean Tryon's newsletter list with a 1916 D-45.  He has visited with me several times about the engine rebuild we are going through.  I gave him the old, original pistons, wrist pins, and rings out of our engine.  He had some broken rings and was wanting to get the engine running to see if it was going to warrant doing a complete rebuild.  I'm glad that somebody might get some use out of them.  Our engine had never been touched inside, so the bore sizes were standard.  I am glad to be able to help someone with the old parts.  It is supposed to be near 65 degrees here tomorrow, so I want to get the manifolding out and photographed.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

As promised, here are photos of the manifolds after the Ceramic Coating.  I had looked into the Porcelain Coating process for the exhaust side primarily, but decided to go the Ceramic route after learning that Porcelain is prone to cracking rather easily.  I was thinking Packard, Cadillac, and others used the Porcelain process, so this must be the Gold Standard.  The more that I read about that process, the better Ceramic got to looking all the time.  The intake on this engine is cast Aluminum.  I had these pieces done in January of 2013 and they look exactly like the day that I opened the crate.  I wanted to show the address for Finish Line so that if anyone has questions, they could contact them direct.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas  aka Doo Dah

PC210679.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

In the interest of keeping moving forward, I got back on the oil sight gauge project.  For those who do not have a car with a dash mounted oil gauge, you don't know the fun that you are missing out on.  The oil line coming off the oil pump has two sections of tubing before it gets to the back side of the dash unit.  It is the same thing from the back side of the dash unit going back to the side of the oil pan.  There are two tubes that run from the firewall to the dash panel and they are of different size.  The line coming off the oil pump is the larger size.  I have posted two photos of the work that I have recently done with the hex nuts and washers to improve the re-assembly process.  The round disc is the backing plate for the gauge housing.  The lines coming into the housing are vertical and the photo shows how things look on the back side of the dash panel with everything in place.  When I removed everything was when I found out just how thin those hex nuts really were.  They were .097" thick and an open end wrench would just barely latch onto then.  I made two new ones for that application and made them .250" thick.  There is more than adequate space to allow for the extra thickness and the wrench will not have any problem holding onto things.  A person has to start with the top line to be able to put things back together.  The second photo shows the position of the lines coming through the firewall - horizontal.  I remade those hex nuts also because of the extremely thin condition.  I was barely able to get a hold of them with an end wrench.  I fixed that problem like I did on the other hex nuts.  The lines have been cleaned up and blown out with high pressure solvent and awaiting polishing out with Brasso and 0000 steel wool.  We have had great weather up until Christmas day and then it has gone south in a few hours.  I am thankful for getting done what I have been able to do up to this point.  I picked up the headlight buckets and forks from the paint shop on Friday and I will post photos of that project as things move along.  One thing that should be mentioned here is that there is somewhere between 18 and 24 inches between the back side of the firewall and the back side of the dash board for the oil lines to do their positional changing in.  I used the threaded bolt remains for illustration purposes only.

 

Barbara and I want to wish everyone a Very Happy New Year.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

PC290689.JPG

Edited by Terry Wiegand
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This photo shows the position of the sight gauge oil lines as they go through the firewall.  The lines make a 90 degree turn to vertical from the back side of the firewall.  This where that fun comes in when things go back together😢

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

PC290690.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I did. I sent them out to Frank Mance Plating in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  The turnaround time was very good.  The cost was very reasonable in my opinion and their work is excellent.  Hope to get some more photos posted tomorrow.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Got some great news earlier this afternoon.  Dave Mattison from Abrahams Machine in Davenport, Iowa called to let me know that they will be finished with my engine during the second week in January.  I have some personal business that will not let me get it picked up until the first week or so of March.  This is a very much appreciated late Christmas present.  Will keep everyone up to date as this situation develops.

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR YA' ALL!

 

Terry and Barbara Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The headlight assemblies are ready for final assembly and I really wanted to see what they might look like in place.  I know this photo looks a little out of place with no fenders, radiator, or hood, but, I think everyone will get the idea.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1040698.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

The headlight assemblies are ready for final assembly and I really wanted to see what they might look like in place.  I know this photo looks a little out of place with no fenders, radiator, or hood, but, I think everyone will get the idea.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1040698.JPG

 

 Getting antsy are we?   LOL  Looks good

 

  Ben

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

This is the day that we have waited almost a year for.  The engine is done and we are excited about going up to bring it back home.  Southeast Iowa is not the best place to be in the dead of Winter.  It will more than likely be the early to middle of March before we can get it back home.  Will keep everyone advised of the goings on.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

The dash-mounted oil sight gauge body came back home today.  It was chemically stripped and the face rim was polished out.  We thought that this piece turned out really nice.  I am going to post several photos to show how this unit goes all together.  The next things to be cleaned up are the connecting tubes that attach to the back of the gauge body and run through the firewall to connect to the lines that come off the oil pump and return back to the side of the oil pan.  It was pretty interesting how these connections were made.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P1240713.JPG

Edited by Terry Wiegand
GRAMMAR (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...