Jump to content

AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


Recommended Posts

On 4/16/2019 at 12:22 PM, Terry Wiegand said:

We are Northbound tonight at around 10:00 PM.  This day has been a long time coming.  More photos when we get back home.  The thin plywood keeps the rods and pistons stable and tight during the trip.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P4160436.JPG

"It is a 1995 that I ordered brand new.  It still has the plastic cover on the back seat from when it was built.  

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas" 

 

--------

 

My 1998 GMC Sierra 1500 3 door, owner since 2002 and driven daily.  Great truck!  

 

20180716_173644.thumb.jpg.dbfcfa4dfb76eaa797c89d8e9b126a8a.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

While we're waiting on the engine, I'm going to get the parts and pieces that I already have done together and all in one place.  Here are two photos of the roller lifter guides and lifter guide  clamps.   Back in the day, the price on the clamps was 20 cents apiece.

I will have the lifter assemblies all put together and plastic bagged waiting to be assembled into the crankcase.  I finished the machine work on these parts in the late Fall of 1996.  It has taken way more time than I have wanted to get this project to where it is now.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P4210442.JPG

Edited by Terry Wiegand (see edit history)
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2019 at 11:34 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

She loved the ride.  It is a bit of a step for her to get in and out.  She said it was a Humdinger.  

 

A friend of mine uses "Humdinger" a lot, he's the only one I've heard say it. 

 

I showed these posts to him, he was impressed you could drive a Buick that way and enjoyed the story and pictures Hugh! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

While we're waiting on the engine, I'm going to get the parts and pieces that I already have done together and all in one place.  Here are two photos of the roller lifter guides and lifter guide  clamps.   Back in the day, the price on the clamps was 20 cents apiece.

I will have the lifter assemblies all put together and plastic bagged waiting to be assembled into the crankcase.  I finished the machine work on these parts in the late Fall of 1996.  It has taken way more time than I have wanted to get this project to where it is now.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

 

Daughter was born in 1996.  She drove the first Reatta to South Bend in 2013 with a younger brother as navigator.  If things go according to plan, she’ll be with me in the Skyhawk down to Oklahoma.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don,

 

The clamps were fine - did nothing with them.  The guides were shot.  There was .052" side-to-side slop in the worse one.  That particular 'find' was what helped make the decision to rebuild the complete valve train.  My Dad always complained that the engine was so noisy.  After I got into it I found exactly why it was so very noisy.  I will be posting more photos of what has already been done in the next few days.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of the valve cage nuts that were made for the 1916 engine AND the 1920 and 1922 engines.  I have a friend who does a lot of work for the plastics facilities up in McPherson, Kansas.  I was able to catch him during a short lull in his work load and they turned these pieces out for me.  They have several 5-Axis machining centers and all of what you see here was done in about two days.  I used 12L14 bar stock and things came out beautifully.  I certainly have the ability to single point parts and pieces like this, but, in the interest of time, it made perfect sense to do it in the machining center.  There are a few extras for each engine just in case.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P5010231.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

This photo shows the rebuilt valve cage assemblies for the 1916 engine.  The valves are new stainless steel.  The springs were made to Buick Motor Company Engineering Drawing specifications.  I machined new spring cups and caps along with a whole bunch of spring cap keepers.  The keepers and spring caps went through the heat treat process.  I machined a special fixture or 'pot' to hold the cage so that the guide area could be bored out.  I used an extruded ductile material called 'DuraBar' for the new guides.  This material machines beautifully and works perfectly with the stainless valve stems.  With proper oiling this material has a tendency to just get slicker over time.  The cage nuts are done.  We're looking at the finished cage assemblies, and the brass sealing rings are finished.  I have been busy behind the scenes with finishing up the many parts and components, so that when the engine does come back home, it will simply be a matter of setting things back together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

VALVE CAGE ASSEMBLY PHOTOS 006.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke with the guys at the machine shop in Davenport, Iowa this morning.  The Mississippi River as of this morning was an inch and a half under the all time record level.  Their shop is dry and they are keeping their fingers crossed.  It will be the first part of June before the flood waters recede.  So, in the meantime, here are some photos of the rebuilt Marvel carburetor for the engine.  Classic Carburetors did the restoration on this for me several years ago.  It is very fortunate that I had this done back then as they have closed the door on their shop.  Here is the 'before' photo.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

1916 BUICK CARBURETOR 001.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Things are starting to move forward once again.  Larry Schramm took the starter/generator unit for the '16 back with him from Chickasha and delivered it to Rex Curtiss in Lansing, Michigan for me to be rebuilt.  He brought it back for me to the BCA Meet in Oklahoma City on Thursday.  Rex and his guys did a beautiful job on it.  I had the front cover and the coupling ring plated before the rebuild.  The top cover that the 'mailbox' coil mounts on is coming back with the painted parts that will be coming back home sometime in the upcoming week.  These guys do absolutely marvelous work on these very complicated pieces of early day electrical equipment.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P6160493.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked up the small painted parts this morning.  This is the cover for the top of the starter/generator unit.  Karla Maxwell out in Southern California restored the brass Delco tag for me.  It is slowly and surely coming back together.  Parts and pieces from this car have been all over this country from one end to the other being rebuilt and/or restored.  I am going back for the fenders next Monday.  I want to be a bit careful about opening up the shop since the wind is at a pretty good clip for the next few days.  I am going to have to be a bit careful about the parts and pieces going back on to this car - the next thing I will know is that I will have a 'TRAILER QUEEN'!  OH MY GOD NO!!  THAT SIMPLY CANNOT HAPPEN!!😝

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P6190496.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke with the shop manager at Abrahams Machine Service last Friday.  They have had the '16 engine going on two months and I was just checking in to see how the shop schedule  is progressing as of the latter part of June.  He told me that they would be starting on my engine in about three weeks.  I asked if based on what they would do with the engine if Thanksgiving might be a realistic completion date.  I was told that that was a very real possibility providing everything goes as planned.  I was also told that the owner of the 1937 Cadillac V-16 was starting to get a little impatient about getting the engine back.  You just gotta love it when a plan comes together like that.  The other guy is doing the pushing and I'm just settin' back and not saying a word.  Will keep everyone up to date on the progress.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as troubleshooting why my 1925-25 has refused to cooperate we zeroed in on the ignition again. I had already changed to a new cap, rotor, re adjusted the points square and tried several new condensers.. Also change out the carb to the spare -again.

While on the VMCCA Nickel tour near me by Gettysburg, Larry Schramm said he would come over with his diagnostic scope. We found that # 4 cylinder had a low output (2nd in the firing order). We tried a new W89D long reach plug. No difference. But at least we had a direction to explore. Thank you Larry!  After Larry left I went through the valve adjustment again on #4 as it was a bit tight and then checking each cylinder. Changing out each plug as I restarted and checked operation. No difference...Since it was now after 10 PM. and was dark. I thought I would turn out the lights and see if there was any crossfire between wires. Yes there was! I had felt that since I had made all new wires several years ago that this would not be an issue.

DSCF7208_Moment.jpg.11aec52e7d064a197b9da28cb5292559.jpg   DSCF7218.thumb.JPG.e64a977518fe4c8c5b43b70649d3c772.JPG

At the time I used NEW Standard Tinned coper conductor wire but in 7mm with a 90 degree rubber boot. I did a copper wire wrap soldered to the male distributer clips. I also made a setting tool to open up the available 7mm clips as to fit snuggly in the 9mm distributer holes. Trying to get all the plug wires as well as coil and distributer wires behind the spark plug cover and through the wire clamp was still a chore. The last change to effect better running I ended up replacing these wires with the 9mm ones that came on my car back in 2011. These could not fit behind the clamp and were not of the correct lengths to do so.

606159756_25BuickMotor.jpg.8f87ad75bfdcd8a7e550845e888ba22d.jpg   Photo of engine as it was when we bought it in Oct. 2011.

BUT! The engine runs fine now! It has some pick up and power. When returning from a several mile drive the car pulled away from stop signs in high gear! With the spark retarded it was a 1/4 turn with the crank to start it. I will probably order the black 9mm set that Hugh had gotten for his car.  

 Since the car is running well now I fell confident enough to get the hood and the rest of the sheet metal back on the front end.

DSCF7569.thumb.JPG.15c0b30ce10f63c79dee88804de35121.JPG    Today I will try to get the right fender on.

Finally some progress!

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry, 

     I am really excited if it is your plug wires that are causing all the trouble.  I had no trouble installing the 9mm wires on my car.  Take note of the order that the wires are installed under the wide wire clamp because I think installing any other way makes the wires all bunched up.  The inner two plugs have to take the longest path from the clamp to the plug.  The 9mm set came from www.RJLautofasteners.com  (listed in the prewar links).   The 16 ga wire to the points is not shown in this picture, but it is hidden in the spark plug cover as well.   For the coil end, I do have a modern coil which is a 7MM connector, so if you can order a 7 mm connector, it is easier than modifying a 9mm connector to fit.   Also attached below is my coil upgrade process.  If you want to do this you will need  some extra length of the 9mm  black cloth spark plug wire as the coil wire that is supplied in the kit is about 6 inches shorter than I needed.  Your correctly painted hood and louvers sure looks nice.    Hugh

IMG_7409.thumb.JPG.55586d49e80f7a922c33d263fd92376e.JPG1571111261_CoilUpgrade.thumb.JPG.89c8339efa88879b931c317efc54757b.JPG

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

We moved another step closer today to getting the D-45 back on the road.  The photo shows the new center main bearing cap bolts.  I was a little nervous about re-using the original bolts and nuts.  As a long time John Deere Tractor restorer, my Dad impressed upon me the importance of replacing nuts and bolts whenever possible because of the stress and pulling of the threads when things originally went together.  I know that this engine was built in 1915 and the metallurgy back then was nowhere close to what it is today, so it was an easy decision to make new nuts and bolts for this application.  I had my friend make these for me on his 5-Axis Machining Center.  We used 4140 material and they came out just perfect.  As I have said before, I have the ability to single point these parts, but, going the CNC route is so much faster and the repeatability with the threads is critical.  Mark Kikta let me borrow one of the bolts from his engine since he has it completely down for the measurements.  Thank You again Mark.  The washers are on their way from McMaster-Carr and once they get here everything will be sent to the folks up in Davenport.  Almost forgot this little detail - the cotter pin holes will be drilled on final assembly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas  

P6280501.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, dibarlaw said:

As far as troubleshooting why my 1925-25 has refused to cooperate we zeroed in on the ignition again. I had already changed to a new cap, rotor, re adjusted the points square and tried several new condensers.. Also change out the carb to the spare -again.

While on the VMCCA Nickel tour near me by Gettysburg, Larry Schramm said he would come over with his diagnostic scope. We found that # 4 cylinder had a low output (2nd in the firing order). We tried a new W89D long reach plug. No difference. But at least we had a direction to explore. Thank you Larry!  After Larry left I went through the valve adjustment again on #4 as it was a bit tight and then checking each cylinder. Changing out each plug as I restarted and checked operation. No difference...Since it was now after 10 PM. and was dark. I thought I would turn out the lights and see if there was any crossfire between wires. Yes there was! I had felt that since I had made all new wires several years ago that this would not be an issue.

DSCF7208_Moment.jpg.11aec52e7d064a197b9da28cb5292559.jpg   DSCF7218.thumb.JPG.e64a977518fe4c8c5b43b70649d3c772.JPG

At the time I used NEW Standard Tinned coper conductor wire but in 7mm with a 90 degree rubber boot. I did a copper wire wrap soldered to the male distributer clips. I also made a setting tool to open up the available 7mm clips as to fit snuggly in the 9mm distributer holes. Trying to get all the plug wires as well as coil and distributer wires behind the spark plug cover and through the wire clamp was still a chore. The last change to effect better running I ended up replacing these wires with the 9mm ones that came on my car back in 2011. These could not fit behind the clamp and were not of the correct lengths to do so.

606159756_25BuickMotor.jpg.8f87ad75bfdcd8a7e550845e888ba22d.jpg   Photo of engine as it was when we bought it in Oct. 2011.

BUT! The engine runs fine now! It has some pick up and power. When returning from a several mile drive the car pulled away from stop signs in high gear! With the spark retarded it was a 1/4 turn with the crank to start it. I will probably order the black 9mm set that Hugh had gotten for his car.  

 Since the car is running well now I fell confident enough to get the hood and the rest of the sheet metal back on the front end.

DSCF7569.thumb.JPG.15c0b30ce10f63c79dee88804de35121.JPG    Today I will try to get the right fender on.

Finally some progress!

 

That's great news!  I can attest to your situation, and how frustrating it can be when ignition problems seem like fuel problems, and vice versa. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Tonight I tightened the last bolt on the bumper and after a year and a half she is back together. Unfortunately it started to rain. Otherwise I would have pulled it out of the garage, put the top down and Joan and I would go for a ride. There will always be more to do but my goal for this past year was to get the car running well and finish the front end paintwork. And If I am lucky a correct top. The body paintwork will come later.
DSCF7572.thumb.JPG.399157bcf22e75917f880edc4e9ac12c.JPG
DSCF7573.thumb.JPG.67af4fb60d7724df6d816be4e4740cea.JPG
 Thanks for all your help and support.
  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry, 

    That is really coming along nicely.  I hope to be able to give you more information and work with you on the convertible top soon.  The sun has really started to beat down on us in Texas, and I would love to have a top on my car as well.  I wonder who else would go in with us on having tops made.  These are a decent car to drive in the summer as long as you can keep the direct sun off yourself.  I do need to start with getting the top sockets measured - and they also need blasting and painting.  I also need to start measuring the wood bows, and I have at least one bow that needs to be replaced.  My top is an aftermarket and fairly shabby, and I want to get the new one made correctly.   The photo of the car when it was at the auction has more of the top attached than when I purchased the car.  Hugh

1886318402_2015-10-2117_57_14.thumb.jpg.b785e77378f52f66f6f803627f8184c7.jpg

192760757_OriginalBuickSale2.jpg.6908af0550a087823d6f045aa1f15c42.jpg

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry I am glad that you were able to eliminate a large portion of your performance issues. The old trick of inspecting plug wires in the dark has been a huge time and money saver for me in the past. I have shared that with many , but most shrug it off until it pays off. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 10:21 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:

Larry, 

    That is really coming along nicely.  I hope to be able to give you more information and work with you on the convertible top soon.  The sun has really started to beat down on us in Texas, and I would love to have a top on my car as well.  I wonder who else would go in with us on having tops made.  These are a decent car to drive in the summer as long as you can keep the direct sun off yourself.  I do need to start with getting the top sockets measured - and they also need blasting and painting.  I also need to start measuring the wood bows, and I have at least one bow that needs to be replaced.  My top is an aftermarket and fairly shabby, and I want to get the new one made correctly.   The photo of the car when it was at the auction has more of the top attached than when I purchased the car.  Hugh

1886318402_2015-10-2117_57_14.thumb.jpg.b785e77378f52f66f6f803627f8184c7.jpg

192760757_OriginalBuickSale2.jpg.6908af0550a087823d6f045aa1f15c42.jpg

 

 

Hugh:

As I have told several others who assumed that they could get a "KIT" top made up. In this day and age there is no such animal. Even the factory at the time could send the top covering but it would still have to be installed by an experienced "Trimmer". Not to say that one could not do their own top. (See Antique Automobile Vol 30. No 6 Nov. Dec 1966.) The feature car is a 1923 Durant Sport Touring  Restored almost entirely by Mr. Jorma Keto. Including the top in a special material that was nearly impossible to still get in the early 1960s. I can attest to his skill since the family has the car on display at the Rural Heritage transportation museum near me in Maryland. 55 years after he restored the car it still looks fabulous! It just takes skill, experience and proper sewing equipment to do a credible job.

 

   Back in the early 1960s in the AACA magazine  had several ads of "Pre-Cut" tops for certain cars. In the same issue quoted above "Carter's Cut & Cover Shop" on page 71 has "Do-It-Yourself" Kits. Of course Model A and T kits as well as some for Maxwell, 1914-18 Chevrolet 490 Touring, 1921 Oakland Touring, 1923 Oldsmobile Touring as well as some upholstery kits. There even was a 1923 Buick Touring kit! Considering there were 4 different model Buick touring cars that year the chance they actually had what was needed for a particular car was slim. (Spanish Grain Leather kit for a model 55)?

 

 Recently there had been a fellow in California who just purchased a 1926-54 Sport roadster (Barn Find). Wow.... I would love to see that. He never sent any photos. With the oil pan removed and the oil pump removed that had the pump shaft missing. I tried to help him in getting that squared away. (2 piece shaft assembly for the Master). After I sent him all the specs he insisted that he could have a replacement made up as a 1 piece in cold rolled steel!)  He had the impression that getting his car on the road was going to take several weeks. He was impatient even at that time line. He repeatedly called with another question about sourcing this or that part. He complained that there was no one near him in California to install a kit top. He told me that he found a late 1920s Chevrolet top kit would fit!  I told him I was skeptical at best as the Buick is a bigger car. But he insisted. He asked about the clutch (which he could not test since the engine was not running) as to how difficult would it be if it needed to be changed out. Well, he did not like my answer and was very upset, now thinking that he would have to sell the car. No call backs since then.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugh,

When your car is ready for the top, there is only one person to call - and that person is Gary Martin at Goldfield Trim and Upholstery.  Gary taught the upholstery class at McPherson College for several years and in my humble opinion is one of the best guys in the upholstery and trim business out there.  You can certainly do what you wish, but, watching you as the perfectionist that you are with this restoration, it would be a flat out crying shame to have a mediocre top on the car.  Gary is in Des Moines, Iowa.  What you will save in trial and error and aggravation will pay for the trip to Iowa.  Gary can be reached at - (785) 906-0125.  His website is - www.goldfieldtrim.com   I learned a long time ago that a person simply cannot be an expert at everything that they want to do.  I will not lay a hammer and saw down to anyone concerning building my shop or the restoration of this old house, however, I don't play with thread and sewing machines.  Give Gary a call.  It will be the smartest call that you will ever make.  He's not paying me to say that either.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Larry and Terry, 

     Thanks for the notes about top availability.  This helps with my understanding and knowing who to turn to if I decide not to do the top on my own.  I have installed numerous tops in the past but like everything on these early Pre war cars, it's just not the same as anything you did before.     Hugh

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugh,

Ask Larry about the top and side curtains on our 1916 D-45.  Gary did the top and curtains for me and Larry has been here and looked the car over in person.  I will be the last person to try and talk you into something that you do not want to do.  With me it is just that I know all about Gary's craftsmanship.  A person will go a long time before they run across someone as capable and talented in upholstery work as Gary Martin.  Regardless of what you do, at least talk with Gary before you decide on what you want to do.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the fenders back from the paint shop yesterday.  We covered them in large commercial trash bags before wrapping them in the moving blankets.  I wanted to get some photos posted before re-wrapping them for storage.  I am very happy with the way things are coming together.  The next thing is to get the gasoline tank sent out for cleaning and the baked internal coating.  The folks at Davenport tell me that there is a pretty good possibility that the engine could be coming back sometime around Thanksgiving.  We're keeping our fingers crossed.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P7060505.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...