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AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


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Don,

I believe that you are absolutely correct.  The sectional view drawing in the Reference Manual shows this bearing to be a ball type bearing.  I have the wrong part here.  I need to be making a couple of calls to two guys who have gone completely through the transmissions on 1916 6-Cylinder cars.  I thought I read the parts book correctly and it is evident that I did not get it right.  Stay tuned.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

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All is not lost here.  The bearing that I got is the front bearing for the input shaft in the front end of the transmission case.  I really do not need this particular bearing, so I am thinking that I will return it for credit.  I did remove the clutch release ring and bearing from the input shaft this afternoon.  After cleaning things up I found that the throw-out bearing is in remarkably good condition.  The solvent tank removed all of what was left of dried up old grease and high pressure cleaning with Kerosene left things ready for the new grease to pack the bearing.  I keep finding things like this that makes me think that this car really doesn't have all that many miles on the clock.  It certainly has led a sheltered existence since going back to 1943.  I can trace its history back that far.  More photos to come.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

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Did a great deal of work with rolling element bearings. A typical ball bearing can handle 1/3 of its radial load in the axial/thrust direction.  They are designed to carry primarily in the radial direction so the 1/3 is sort of ‘free’. Often a consideration for helical gear thrust loads. 

 

That’s a big roller bearing if that’s a standard paper towel it’s resting on.  I assumed it was a rear wheel bearing for a ‘newer’ late 20s Buick. 

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The throw-out bearing has been thoroughly cleaned and ready for grease.  After getting this all cleaned up I was amazed at how good of condition it is in.  The other associated parts relating to the input shaft are soaking in the solvent tank and hopefully the temperature will stay high enough so that I can get the other parts cleaned up.  Hope everyone had a Very Merry Christmas.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

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 Since the kids descended upon us last Saturday I have had a miserable cold. Yesterday I was finally feeling able to go out to the garage and do some work. I got the new oil pressure line made up with my new expensive tube sleeve nuts and installed. While I changed out the old S/W oil gage I also changed out the S/W Ammeter to the original National style. Unfortunately I did not study the configuration of both gages. The S/W shows charge to the right while the National shows charge to the left. I hooked it up backwards which when I started the engine pegged it to discharge. I reversed the leads and it does now show charge but will not set at”0” when off. When I first got the gage I had a time getting it to rest at “0” so I may have to pull it and balance the pointer again.

 By the way. Working on the instruments is much easier with the cowl vent off and the speedometer out.

 I ran the engine for about 20 minutes. At slightly elevated idle the Vacuum gage was steady at 15 lbs. After cool down I snugged up the manifold nuts again. The engine does feel responsive. With the National 0-50 lb oil gage the pressure was showing close to 25lbs. The old S/W gage was about the same at 22 lbs. I feel that the valve clearance still needs some tweaking.

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Larry,

I wonder just how many variations of these oil pressure gauges there were.  I think that at one time I had about five of them.  I ended up getting one good one out of all of the parts and pieces.  Here is what I have left.  As you can see there are differences.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry:

 Good to talk with you last night as usual. There does appear to be quite a variety of gage types, pressures, mountings etc. Your earlier gages go up to 10 lbs. Depending on applications. The original National gage for my 1925 standard is to be a 0-30 lb. I searched for years to find one and was only able to find the 0-50 lb on ebay  several years ago.

 It had a bracket mount for a motor cycle. That is why I had to make a new mounting bracket. I had to re-stake the mounting studs since they were loose. The threads were #14X24. Luckily I have both a tap and die. 

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Original gages in my friend Dan Evan's original low mileage 1925-21 sedan. Photo taken at the 2014 Portland Meet.

 After I showed Hugh what I did with my 0-50 unit he said he had several spare 0-30 units. I already spent a lot of time reworking my gage to start all over again.

There was currently a National 0-30 gage on Ebay that has a threaded bezel.

 I had to make a special holding jig to clamp the case to work off the fragile bezel. I had the bezel re-plated and after a search of clock shops, welding supplier (pressure gage replacement parts) to find a lens, I ended up cutting and fitting my own. I do have a very rough 0-30 with rust holes in the case and an obliterated face. It has the inlet for an 1/8" O.D. line. 

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The carburetor is now rebuilt and I have gone thru the heat riser system.  I basically made brass plates to block the system off from the exhaust.   The motor is filled with oil.  I was going to crank the motor with the plugs out until I read oil pressure on the gauge, but I think the motor is a little tight and I am afraid that I will just put a lot of strain on the starter.  Larry DiBarry did send me a starter gear, and it is amazing how much better everything works when you have the right parts.  The Starter pedal is off to the powder coater so vice grips are filling in.  I broke my starter pedal when the pedal bolt was on but not tight, and I pushed on the pedal.  It broke smooth across the keyway.  That would not be good if this bolt ever came loose while in service.  Larry again helped keep me moving by spreading Buick holiday cheer in the way of small packages.  

 

I think my best bet is to just work a little more on what is needed to make the motor run and skip the idea of a cranking without the plugs.  I do seem to have good compression which is nice.   I am moving on to getting the exhaust sorted out.  I have several hangers and clamps to fabricate.

Hugh  

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Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Yesterday afternoon (it was 62 degrees here) I got the oil lines that feed the dash-mounted sight gauge disconnected.  Once these are cleaned and flushed, I will polish them like my friend in North Carolina did on his 1916 D-45.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 4 weeks later...

The UPS guy just dropped off the clutch cone about 30 minutes ago.  I had sent it out to Bob Knaak in California to have the new leather lining installed.  I am very happy with the result.  Don't you just love it when a plan comes together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 2 weeks later...

If you go back and look at the photos that I posted on November 30, the one photo has the cracks circled.  I spoke with Tom Noland earlier today and he said the casting repair would be finished this weekend.  We will get it back home on the 23rd.  He educated me about these early day castings.  I learned that they have hard spots in them and of course this block had to have one of the cracks run right through one of the them.  He was able to save the block and laughingly told me not to bring him any more like this one.  I will post some photos when I get it home and have the freeze plugs installed.  I want to give it one good coat of paint before it heads to the machine shop for rebuilding.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 3 weeks later...

The cylinder block is back home and tucked away awaiting the next Winter storm that is headed our way.  This photo shows the repair work that has been done - wait a minute! - what repair work? - I don't see anywhere where any work was done.  The guys at Noland's Cylinder Head Service are simply that good.  They pressure tested the block at 45 psi and it was solid.  In talking with Tom Noland I was able to learn about cast iron and some of its properties.  He told me that when a casting like this is allowed to cool too quickly, that that is what causes hard spots.  Plus the quality of the material back at that time was not as good as what we have today.  Metallurgy has evolved light years in the last 100+ years.  I think that I will take my Dotco and gently go over the casting wherever  I can and finesse the surface so that once the paint goes on it won't look too bad in certain spots.  I am just glad to be able to keep moving forward and this is a huge step toward getting it ready to turn over to the engine rebuilding shop.  The three manifold studs have to be threaded yet and set in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 2 weeks later...

It is a beautiful day here and work begins again on the 1916 engine.  I took the temporary freeze plugs out and installed the 'Made in US of A' Dorman plugs.   This is a Buick for cryin' out loud - can't have any foreign crap anywhere on this car.  Tomorrow the new manifold studs will be put in place and I will finesse the casting a bit with the Dotco so that the paint will look pretty good when that part of the rebuild is done.  I wanted to wait a bit on ordering the paint so that the danger of freezing during shipment is not so great.  Larry Schramm is taking the starter/generator unit up to Rex Curtis in Lansing, Michigan for a rebuild for me.  Rex has told me that he will have it for me in June so that Larry can bring it back to me in Oklahoma City at the Buick National Meet.  The next thing is to pull the crankcase out of the frame and get the engine up to Davenport, Iowa for the rebuild.  More photos to come.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Here is a photo of a rather simple shop aid that I made.  I am going to use this to help spread the frame rails about .050" - .075" at the flywheel housing engine mounts.  Doing this will allow picking the crankcase straight up and out of the frame rather easily.  Back in the day Buick engineered things to fit together very precisely and I know from experience in parting out two rolling chassis that this will be an extremely useful and simple tool to have on hand for this project.  The body will have been lifted slightly to allow for the slight movement in the rails.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Here is a better photo of the three manifold studs that I had to remake.  Three of them went South during the thermal cleaning process.  The studs thread into the water jacket, so that means that the threads will need to be sealed.  I will post a photo when this has been done.  Then the casting will get its first coat of paint.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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We have a very nice afternoon going on, so, I got the new manifold studs installed.  While waiting for the paint to get here from Bill Hirsch, I will get busy with the Dotco and wire brushes and finesse the casting.  I am going to give the casting one coat of paint before I take it to the engine rebuilders.  I will give it the second coat after it comes back home.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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22 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Here is a photo of a rather simple shop aid that I made.  I am going to use this to help spread the frame rails about .050" - .075" at the flywheel housing engine mounts. 

 

Couldn't you use a bottle jack?

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There are several ways to do what needs to be done here.  My little shop aid weighs about 4 or 5 pounds and will be relatively easy to position in place.  I will post a photo when this part comes into play.  You are absolutely right - there are several ways to do the same thing in most cases.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The frame rails spreader has been put in place.  Next thing is to free up the body to frame rail bolts and then undo the motor mount bolts.  I will only need to lift the body about two inches to allow the flywheel housing arms to come forward under the firewall.  The coupling nuts and eyebolts are in place as can be seen in the photo.  The steering column has been disconnected from the firewall and the dash panel allowing the body to come up just enough for the needed clearance.  More photos will posted as things proceed.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Here is the camshaft that will go back into the engine during the rebuild.  I sent this down to Competition Cams in Memphis to have them check it out.  They checked it for straightness, the bearings for round, and most importantly, they magnafluxed it to check for any cracking and/or fissures.  It got a clean bill on everything.  They then micro-polished the lobes and bearing journals.  The lobes show absolutely no signs of wear at all.  I cannot say that about the cam that is presently in the engine.  The way things look today, we will be delivering the engine to Abrahams Machine Service in Davenport, Iowa on the 19th.  The valve train on this engine will be starting life again in a brand new (as originally built) condition.  Having all of this work done ahead of time is really going to speed the rebuilding process up.  More photos to come.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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My son-in-law helped me this morning and the crankcase was removed from the frame.  We were very careful and things went exactly as planned.  Two weeks from today we will be delivering the engine to the rebuilder in Davenport, Iowa.  I will post photos when I have everything ready to set in the truck.  I owe Glenn Manes a huge thank you for the advice on how to lift the body to remove the crankcase.  The body only came up about 1 1/2" to let the flywheel housing slip under the firewall.  Things worked real nice.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry:

Good progress! You had asked about the engine cradle I had made. This is what I came up with to transport the engine to Reeve's Enterprises in Cazanovia NY.

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Then I had to make another when we went to get the spare engine from Louisville KY.

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I just about have the transport cradle finished up.  The back end is finished and I will finish up the front end a little later this afternoon.  This engine minus the transmission and starter/generator unit will probably weigh in somewhere around 600 pounds.  Once the engine is all back together the center of gravity will raise noticeably and it will have to ride close to 575 miles coming back home.  There just cannot be any problems.  We hate problems at our place.  More photos to come.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The big consideration in putting this 'carrier if you will', together was that I wanted for it to be fork-lift friendly on the re builders end.  It will ride very nicely in the back of my truck.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The transport cradle is finished and the last thing that I will do is put a strip of 1/4" plywood on each side of the pistons to secure them from movement.  I guess I can add engine transporter to my resume now.  It is hurry up and wait.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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We are Northbound tonight at around 10:00 PM.  This day has been a long time coming.  More photos when we get back home.  The thin plywood keeps the rods and pistons stable and tight during the trip.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The engine was delivered to Abrahams Machine Service in Davenport, Iowa this morning.  The gentleman who is going to be doing the work on our engine is also working on a 1937 Cadillac V-16 engine.  That engine is really quite impressive when it is completely torn down.  I have other parts and pieces on the car to attend to while the engine is gone.  Will keep everyone up to date on the progress.  Here is the contact information for Abrahams should anyone want to contact them with questions.  Really great folks to work with.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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On 4/16/2019 at 12:22 PM, Terry Wiegand said:

We are Northbound tonight at around 10:00 PM.  This day has been a long time coming.  More photos when we get back home.  The thin plywood keeps the rods and pistons stable and tight during the trip.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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What year is that pickup truck? 

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