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AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


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Gary Martin found this Finishing Report sheet inside the rear passenger door panel when he reupholstered the interior of the car.  I like to think of this as the 'birth certificate' for this automobile.  The really important thing is the date that is listed.  10/15 could be October 15th or the 10th month of calendar year 1915.  Either way, it establishes that this car was built in the calendar year of 1915.  This makes it a true 'Brass Era' automobile and we can also participate in Horseless Carriage Club sanctioned national events.  The other really interesting thing is that the various assemblies had a serial number.  There is a serial number for the transmission, starter/generator unit along with the frame and engine number.   I thought everyone might like to see this.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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When Gary called and told me about this I was dumbfounded.  I have since learned of one other car that this document was located in.  Evidently this was something that Buick must have done before shipping the cars out to the original dealer.  I can trace the history of this car back to 1943.  The 28 years between 1915 and 1943 are a blank at this point for me.  I spoke with the gentleman who owned the car for the 20-year period from 1943 to 1963 before he passed in 2000.  His daughter lives in Southeast Kansas and I want to contact her and see what she can tell me about her father's ownership of the car.  I would really like to know just where the car was originally sold and by that I mean what town and state.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I got all of the floorboards in place this morning.  I am here to tell you all that putting the flat washer, lock washer, and hex nut on the machine screw by the brake and clutch pedal was a total gotdammit.  With the boss helping, we managed to get it done after about 20 minutes.  The two flat boards lift out real easy so that getting to the battery box is not a problem at all.  I placed the 'shift pattern' disc so that it is easy to see from the driver's seat position.  My friend is going to help me with the new brake rods and we will probably do that next week.  I want to get the front tires back on the wheels and covered up.  I think that I have gone as far as I can until the rear axle is ready to go back under the car.  Supposed to be 71 degrees here today.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Don,

I got several of those discs from a fellow in Texas probably 25 years or more ago.  I believe that the ones I got are reproductions from an original.  The ones I got were cast Aluminum and when whoever did them, they did an outstanding job with them.  I sent this one out to Karla Maxwell in California and she did the paintwork for me.  I'm thinking that I remember someone saying that back in the day the dealers put these in the cars to help the drivers of new Buicks be able to drive them easier.  So, in answer to your question - no, it is not original to the car from the factory.  I have one left and I'm going to have Karla do that one for our 1920.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I got the badge holder put in place and now its wait until the brake rods are finished up.  The gals out in the AACA office got me connected with the supplier of the badge holders and I contacted them.  The Horseless Carriage Club Century Old Vehicle plate doesn't quite match the drilled holes in the AACA holder.  I contacted their supplier and I am getting some undrilled holders.  This is a Buick for cryin' out loud - we gotta have something that is gonna look cool on it.  That plate will go on the other end of the holder bracket.  Not trying to blow my own horn here, but in my humble opinion, it is the little gingerbread details like this that will make everyone take notice of the car.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out Doo Dah Way

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The tires are back on the wheels and covered up.  Here is an idea of what the HCCA badge will look like when it is finished up.  There is going to be a feeling of huge accomplishment when this car comes down off the blocks and sets on its tires for the first time in a very long time.  We are very happy with how this restoration has gone, but there is still a ways to go.  The light is getting bigger and brighter at the end of that proverbial tunnel.  In the meantime the bottom is falling out of the thermometer and the work is going to come to a halt.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in a COLD Doo Dah

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21 hours ago, chuckfmtexas said:

Terry, following your narrative, it looks like I can apply for the 100 yr old badge for my 1921 Touring 45 early next year?
 

Chuck

 

Chuck,

Only for the HCCA.  The BCA is going to hold you hostage to bring your car to a national meet to receive the BCA medallion.

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Chuck,

Please keep in mind that the 100 year old vehicle medallion in my previous photo comes from The Horseless Carriage Club of America.  I have been a member for right at 50 years.  Go back and read Larry Schramm's comment about the Buick club and you will be able determine the difference between the two organizations.  We are looking to tour a lot with this Buick when it gets back on the road.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The bottom sides of the running boards have been given a heavy coat of Rustoleum Flat Black and they are ready for the Burlap-Backed Linoleum to be glued down on the top side and the mouldings put back on.  The running boards need to go back on the hangers before the rear fenders go back on.  At this point it is hurry up and wait.  The rear axle assembly needs to be pressure washed and thoroughly cleaned up before it goes back under the car.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Finished up the new brake rods this afternoon.  I'll go out on that proverbial limb and say that I think that this is going to be the end of rebuilding old parts.  I simply do not trust the old threads on the original rods to do the job.  I'd rather be safe than have to deal with problems out on the road.  Mark Shaw and I had a good discussion about how to adjust the brakes once everything is all back together.  We were finishing up the service brake rod when this photo was taken.  We want to wish all of our friends and fellow Early Buicks Enthusiasts A Very Merry Christmas and A Whole Lot Happier New Year all around the world!!

 

Terry and Barbara Wiegand

               and 

Miss Muggins The Wonder Pup

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From about 1:00 til 4:00 this afternoon, and on Christmas day of all days, it was almost 61 degrees here in Doo Dah.  I got the new brake rods fine tuned and ready to go back in their places when the time comes.  I used some home-made brackets to set the lengths.  This will be really close to the positions that they were in before the rear axle was removed.  The Brass bracket on the one rod is for the return spring on the service brake rod.  That of course was missing from the chassis when Dad got the car.  I made the bracket adjustable so that it can be set to the spring that I will use.  As I posted earlier, Mark Shaw and I had a good discussion on how to set the rods so that both brake bands will clamp down at the same time and will lock up the rear wheels together.  We are going to have one more beautiful day and then it all goes downhill fast.  We hope everyone had a wonderful Christmas and stayed healthy.  We're looking forward to a better year that is just around the corner.

 

Terry and Barbara Wiegand and we cannot forget Miss Muggins

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I have parted out three other 1916 D-45's over the years.  One of those remains had a frame number that was about 2,000 numbers earlier than our car that we have had in our family for almost 60 years.  One detail about that chassis was this ring gear cover.  I have only seen one other car with this cover on it.  My Illustrated Parts Catalog shows a plain stamped steel cover.  It is very obvious that the WM denotes a Weston-Mott rear axle.  I pulled this cover off and replaced it with a plain one.  I cleaned this one up and glass beaded it.  I had it painted and Karla Maxwell hand painted the embossed letters for me.  This will go on after the rear axle has been cleaned up.  Thought that you guys might like to see this out in the open.  I have asked everyone about this cover and its significance and the question just draws a blank.  Nobody knows a thing and has never seen one before either.  Any comment will be appreciated.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

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Billy bought the Mott axle company when he first started GM. They were near Utica, NY on the Erie Canal, run by the same family that started the Mott's apple sauce company in Bouckville, NY also right on the Erie Canal. Only a few miles away on the canal, Remington Arms, a gun company over 200 years old. Everything in America started on the Erie Canal.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I took the spark and throttle quadrant off the steering wheel this morning.  I am sending it out to Mark Kikta and he in turn is going to take it to Annapolis to the folks who polished his one out.  These parts are really not all that bad, but Aluminum has a real tendency to oxidize if left alone for long periods of time.  The turnaround time is about 3 1/2 weeks.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Thats a good picture, I need to find the larger one of the two my handle part is broke off. If any one has one please let me know. 

Good turn around time, and they will look like new

Edited by rjp
I added more (see edit history)
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I have a correct belly pan (drip apron) for this car.  The jury is out as to whether it can be used or not.  These things were made from a very thin gauge of sheet metal and this one is REALLY ROUGH in one area.  There is a very good reason as to why these things are so scarce.  When my Dad got this car I remember my lifelong friend, Vaden Stroud, telling him that back in the day these things were taken off the cars and thrown away because they caused the engines to run hot.  He said the reason for that was because the radiators were short and the cooling surfaces were a victim of reduced airflow.  The belly pans were removed and things were helped dramatically.  I am going back and forth between putting this thing on the car or leaving it off.  IF I use it, it is going to need a lot of help to get it back to a presentable condition.  The car left the factory with one of these on it and I am thinking it sure would be neat to have it on there.  At this point I just don't know.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Plus - It will catch any parts that vibrate loose.   All the leaks go to one place on the garage floor.  It may keep some of the road dust and dirt out of the engine bay.

Minus - Cost to restore.    You have to clean the pan when you show the car, and remove it to work on the car.   

 

I am not buying that your car will run hotter if it is installed. 

 

That pan looks easier to put in order than to fabricate a new one.  I would powder coat it "chassis black" if restoring.  It will hide any inperfections.  The powder coating holds up to gasoline better as well.  

Hugh

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Terry there is only one way to find out if it will increase operating temperature and that is to try it! I do heavily favor total originality BUT drive ability is my first objective. You have done a fantastic job all the way through.

Edited by raydurr (see edit history)
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Terry,  I am thinking that since you have done such an outstanding job getting your cooling system in order, that belly pan may not cause any heat issues.  It may be that over time the cooling system on other cars were not working as well from cooling system corrosion and rust build up, and removal of the pan was the first step to keep the car cool.   Given that you have some rust on the pan says your pan spent some time in service and was functioning without causing cooling issues.    Hugh    

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I am working toward getting the fuel system finished up.   Several years ago my friend and I made some new fuel line connection plugs for my cars and some other friends' cars.  I have new copper line to run to the gasoline tank on the back end and this connection attaches to the lid in the vacuum tank.  Once this is all in place the fuel system will be finished.  There are two copper crush washers that go with this connection also.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Don,

All that I can tell you is that the fuel line from the gasoline tank to the vacuum tank on this car is Copper.  They are the same material as the oil lines coming off the oil pump and running to the sight gauge on the dash panel.  Maybe at some point some automobiles used Brass fuel lines.  Brass is a much harder material to bend to the needed configurations.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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You might consider Cunifer, as it looks fairly similar to copper. Copper is not a terrific idea for fuel lines as it work hardens and may crack, although it was often used in the early days.

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I sure wish that my friend, Larry DiBarry was a whole closer.  I'd try to get him to help me out with this belly pan.  I haven't found anyone in my area that knows anything about 'bumping' metal.  We took the pan up to McPherson College this afternoon and had a good visit with Chris Paulsen about what I am wanting to do.  He thinks that he might be able to steer some help my way with this project.  Something that we talked about I had forgotten about.  I told him about what my Dad had been told about these things causing overheating problems for the cars back in the say.  He mentioned that they were somewhat of a fire hazard also from dripping gasoline.  The way that I am looking at this is this - The car left Flint with one on it.  I have one that is correct for the car and I would at least like to see what it looks like on the car.  IF it did not cause any cooling system problems, then I might leave it on.  Otherwise, I will remove it and hang it on the shop wall.  Chris is going to help me out with the contact information for the folks who can clean thin gauge material like this is.  I'll keep everyone posted about the progress with this pan.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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On 12/9/2020 at 8:59 PM, Terry Wiegand said:

Don,

I got several of those discs from a fellow in Texas probably 25 years or more ago.  I believe that the ones I got are reproductions from an original.  The ones I got were cast Aluminum and when whoever did them, they did an outstanding job with them.  I sent this one out to Karla Maxwell in California and she did the paintwork for me.  I'm thinking that I remember someone saying that back in the day the dealers put these in the cars to help the drivers of new Buicks be able to drive them easier.  So, in answer to your question - no, it is not original to the car from the factory.  I have one left and I'm going to have Karla do that one for our 1920.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Hi Terry,

 

any chance you can take better picture (striaght view) of this shifiting disc? What is the size of it? I could be possibly able to reproduce it...

 

Josef

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I pulled the steering wheel this afternoon and will prepare it for refinishing.  For being almost 106 years old, it is really in very good condition.  The steering shaft is tapered and keyed to fit the wheel hub.  Since it had been off once before it was easy to remove.  The spark and throttle quadrant is being polished out and when things go back together it should look brand new.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry:

 Hard to tell even from the close up. I would assume walnut. The wheel on My 1925 Master is walnut. Interesting how your wheel is attached to the spider. A formed wood "biscut" cut out section with 2 plugs.

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 The Master wheel has wood plugs on the periffery. Special radial tounge and groove joints.

 The 25 Standard wheel is a plainer grain species with a darker stain. It might be maple.

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The wheel I recieved from the Oregon parts. Notice the attachment is from below with screws at an angle. 

The incorrect wheel I had on it before was maple. No finger grips.1429716563_1925BUICKSTEERINGWHEELANDDASH.jpg.656ab04a6d2341d4984e5f44078f24e0.jpg Photo before I bought the car. March 2011.

DSCF8084.thumb.JPG.296cc4eceb968c942fbaec90027c64c8.JPG Oregon wheel now installed.

 

 

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