Terry Wiegand

AND THEN THERE WERE THREE

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I got the yard-work all done up yesterday so that I could start working on the engine this morning.  I put the cages in the back cylinder before the engine goes back into the frame.  I did this because the back end of the block is pretty close to the firewall and I wanted to be able to have freedom of movement for the long handles on the cage nut tool.  So far, everything is going back together perfectly.  My cage nut tool and long handles has really worked out well.  One thing that I forgot to mention earlier is that having the manifolds off lets me look into the ports and make sure that the cage ports are positioned in the center of the block ports.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

P5020810.JPG

P5020811.JPG

P5020812.JPG

Edited by Terry Wiegand
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION (see edit history)
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a pretty nice day here, so, I'm going to do what I can until the order from Restoration Supply gets here.  I'm waiting on High Head Hex Machine Bolts that will be much easier to change out this way than once the engine goes back into the frame.  I got the timing case tags put in place.  I got these identical reproduction tags from Jeff Marshall down in New Zealand.  In fact my friend, Keith Townsend in North Carolina got a set from Jeff at the same time I got these for his D-45.  I took photos of the old tags so that I would be sure to get the new ones back in the right position.  I guess Buick wanted the service people to be able to read the tags from the engine side of the radiator.  Every little bit keeps things moving forward.  Late yesterday morning I got the cowl and to the back side of the front doors polished out and ready for waxing.  A person can tell that the body was finished with a brush, but, it came out pretty well thank you.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P5060816.JPG

P5060817.JPG

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terry,  could you provide contact details for jeff Marshall  in NZ , Google is only finding a motor cycle dealer ? Thanks Norm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the rocker post assemblies out this afternoon and made sure that they were fully greased and ready for installation when that time comes.  I'm waiting on bolts from Restoration Supply and for the rain to finally stop.  I want to put the new oil pan bolts in while the engine is still out of the frame.  It will be so much easier that way.  I'm getting there - just not fast enough to suit me.  I am not ashamed to tell anyone that putting this engine back into the frame has me a little bit on edge.  Experience has taught me that things always come apart easier than they go back together.  I learned that real early helping my Dad with his 2-Cylinder John Deere restorations.  We're not gonna worry too much about it though.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Miscellaneous Photos 155.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

... I am not ashamed to tell anyone that putting this engine back into the frame has me a little bit on edge.  Experience has taught me that things always come apart easier than they go back together.  I learned that real early helping my Dad with his 2-Cylinder John Deere restorations. 

Miscellaneous Photos 155.jpg

Terry,

This is exactly what I needed to hear today for ‘Fifteen maybe twenty thousand’ reasons — and the reason why I’m paying shop rate for all of this being done on mine.

I simply lack the experience (or time). Holy cow, just trying to keep the con-rod shims in order I accidentally bumped one and the darned thing stuck to a tiny dab of oil on my clumsy thumb. No idea which pile it came from.

*ring ring ring*

That and the Jesus Rings that came popping out of the manifold when I pulled it away from the engine....

 

I think a lot of us are more anxiously awaiting your engine to go back together than you are.

Good luck,

Ben P.

Edited by Ben P.
Typo (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ben,

Thank You for the compliments.  I try really hard to get this exactly right.  The goal is to run the wheels off this car with touring once it has been all sorted out.  A lot of folks haven't got the slightest idea just how much fun an open car can be.  Next month this old Buick will start on 58 years of being in my family and I was 15 years old the first time my Dad let me drive it.  I was instantly hooked and it hasn't gone away since.  The rain needs to be turned off - we have had way more than our share in the last week.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Rain-Soaked Doo Dah

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got just a little bit more done today.  The valves are in place for #1 and #2 cylinders and #5 and #6.  I will install the last 4 valves once the engine is back in the frame.  I want to leave those out so that the hoist sling will not cause any problems with them.  The Nickel Plated, original breather caps are back in place.  In the one photo the new High Head Hex Machine Bolts in the oil pan can be seen.  I chased the threads on the cone clutch studs in the flywheel and the last thing I have left to do is install the crankcase oil drain spigot and thread it in.  Once that is done it is call my helpers and get the cherry-picker ready.  This has been a long time coming to get to this point.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas 

P5200823.JPG

P5200824.JPG

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2019 at 11:45 PM, Hubert_25-25 said:
My 1925 Buick Standard recently started running very poorly.  About 400 miles on the car.  Leaving me stranded.  Would not restart.  Started needing the choke pulled during cranking even after being warmed up, then quickly push it in.  If it would not start, it required a shot of starting fluid.  Fortunately it died near a Walmart the first time it died.   I have been carrying a can of starting fluid with me since. 
 
I checked dwell, timing, replaced the plugs since they were black, saw arcing in the plug wires - changed them.  Saw cracks in the distributor cap - changed it.  Ran slightly better but only after turning the air valve in a few turns and turning the throttle stop screw in so it ran with more throttle opening to keep from stalling.
 
In the end, still, it would not start after being turned off without a quick shot of starting fluid.  The carburetor would start flowing gas on to the ground when I stopped cranking.  A 6" diameter puddle of gas.  I decided that I wanted to check the needle and seat.  I also wanted to use a mirror to see if the venturi pot metal block had grown and was not letting the air valve close,    
 
I removed the lower brass float section of the carburetor.  Turning it upside down and sucking on the fuel inlet, no air was going thru, so the needle and seat were working well.  
 
I used a mirror and looked up into the bottom of the updraft carburetor.  The air valve was not moving to the opposite wall.  When I unscrewed the air valve adjuster,  the marvel spring inside was very rusty.  It was clean 6 months ago.  The rust had also gone between the barrel of the air valve screw and the air valve plunger.  This caused the air valve to either move very slowly or stay in one place.  I cleaned up the rusty spring and cleaned all the rust flakes out of the spring and piston area.  I cleaned up the spring on the wire wheel and did a quick tin zinc plate on it using my home plater.  
 
Everything works well again.  The only time it needs a choke is briefly on a cold start.  Any other time, just turn on the ignition and push the starter. It starts immediately.  I set the throttle screw back where it was.  As before, if I set the timing on full retard, the engine will lope at 375 RPM.  Sweet music.  I need to soak this spring in vinegar for a few days and then plate it again to do a better plating job, but long term I do need to find a replacement spring.  Also to others to inspect that spring in the air valve as it needs good plating on it.  
 
I fixed it just in time to be able to take my car thru our local "Festival of lights" parade.  It ran great.  The crowds loved the Ahooga horn.  
Hugh  
1851229845_FestivalofLights11-24-19.thumb.jpg.2629abb2c121da10f6f3ed8aa7cc4f9d.jpg

Hugh, That car has come a long way and looks Fantastic!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent some time this afternoon at my local 'long time' parts shop looking through their Brass fuel fittings.  I think I found what I am going to use on the vacuum tank fuel shutoff fittings.  One of the these will go on the 1916 and I will retro-fit the other one on the 1920.  I am finding out that some of these fittings are getting a bit hard to come by these days.  This is going to work well with the Copper line feeding the carburetor.  By the way, the engine is going back into the frame on Saturday. I will be posting photos of that.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P5270828.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is extreme joy out in Doo Dah on this Saturday morning.  The engine is back in the frame and I would have never thought that it would have went so smooth.  I hooked onto the engine with the hoist and 15 minutes later it was all done and over with.  The two guys in the photo are my son-in-law and his good friend.  I could not have done this without their help.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah America

P5300833.JPG

P5300834.JPG

P5300835.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Terry has his engine back in and the new timing gear has been reinstalled in my 1925 Standard Beulah.

DSCF8147.thumb.JPG.04e0c02352401ac32c923c72aa62b847.JPGThings are looking up.

 Friday night Beulah started right up after all was reassembled and timed. Now today to reinstall the radiator and hood so we can go for a ride!

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, dibarlaw said:

Well, Terry has his engine back in and the new timing gear has been reinstalled in my 1925 Standard Beulah.

DSCF8147.thumb.JPG.04e0c02352401ac32c923c72aa62b847.JPGThings are looking up.

 Friday night Beulah started right up after all was reassembled and timed. Now today to reinstall the radiator and hood so we can go for a ride!

 

What did you use for a replacement timing gear, aluminum or original?  Hard to tell from the picture... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don:

I have an all fiber one from "Then and Now". I did have to make a spacer since there is no metal hub. The very nice full tooth original I had as a spare had several teeth showing fractures.

DSCF8143.thumb.JPG.3c6cfec5bfaa77dc231c6c8f20127aec.JPG

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I finished getting all of the valve cage assemblies and rocker posts installed this morning.  I removed my 'shop aid' frame spreader and the body has been bolted back down on the frame.  Raising the whole body about an inch and a half at the firewall was just the ticket to slip the engine back into the frame.  Removing the steering column was most helpful also.  Hopefully things will be a lot easier going back together.  I slipped the NOS AC Titan Spark Plugs in just to get an idea what they will look like when installed for good.  This is really getting to the fun part of this rebuild.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

P6040845.JPG

P6040846.JPG

Edited by Terry Wiegand
GRAMMAR (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Removing the steering column was most helpful also. 

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

P6040845.JPG

P6040846.JPG

 

I'm not even sure how anyone gets an engine in or out without removing the column.  Especially if the column and engine are detailed.  There just isn't enough room on my 27.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine stayed in, but it’s a different kind of animal....

49C9F424-1CE5-40EC-BDDE-325A1884A18F.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Ben P. said:

Mine stayed in, but it’s a different kind of animal....

49C9F424-1CE5-40EC-BDDE-325A1884A18F.jpeg

 

Still looks tight there... Did you have to swing the block around the column box? 

 

If I tried to swing my engine to the side, I would run into something for sure. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe it or not she actually came straight up and out. Hired a shop to do it since cheaper than buying a cherry picker for 1 use - I made out on that because they did run into a snag getting the trans. out of the way. All floorboards had to come out and then the differential had to be slid back 3”. Did it for the same price even though it took a full extra day to consult with people deciding how to do it. LOL.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

I finished getting all of the valve cage assemblies and rocker posts installed this morning.  I removed my 'shop aid' frame spreader and the body has be bolted back down on the frame.  Raising the whole body about an inch and a half at the firewall was just the ticket to slip the engine back into the frame.  Removing the steering column was most helpful also.  Hopefully things will be a lot easier going back together.  I slipped the NOS AC Titan Spark Plugs in just to get an idea what they will look like when installed for good.  This is really getting to the fun part of this rebuild.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in Doo Dah

P6040845.JPG

P6040846.JPG

Terry i consider myself a Post War Buick lover with a huge interest in Pre War Buick's and i have to say that your engine both in and out of the car has to be one of the best looking pieces of machinery i have seen. I have always loved the open valve train engines. Best of luck with it

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a little bit more done today before calling it quits to start on the weekly yard work.  I sent the manifolds out to Finish Line Coatings in the Portland, Oregon area for Ceramic Coating.  The intake is cast Aluminum and that came out looking almost like it was plated or polished out.  I'll try to get some photos of that posted soon once it is in place.  I wanted to get the push-rods in place before the starter/generator unit is put back in place.  I am going to set the valve clearance at .008" COLD before the initial start-up.  After the engine has run for a bit, I will then go back and reset the clearance to .007" HOT.  Don, I'm sure that your '27 is not that much different than what I have here.  I had the cylinder block removed from the crankcase when that was taken out of the frame and that was a really tricky job lifting it out without tearing up anything.  I had helped my Dad go through the complete front end on this car in the Winter of 1963, so I knew what to expect in dealing with the steering column removal/re-install.  All of the parts and pieces that have been gone through and set aside are paying off in time savings now.  Gotta love it when a plan comes together.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

P6040849.JPG

P6040850.JPG

P6040851.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marty, Mark, and All,

Thank you for your compliments.  It is very rewarding when others can see and appreciate what a person is trying to do with a restoration.  In my case, I learned from the Master.  My Dad was the consummate perfectionist and restorer of John Deere 2-Cylinder Tractors.  He taught me at a very early age how to use tools properly and to never take any short cuts.  I lost my Dad almost 23 years ago and I know that he has been watching over me with this engine rebuild.  About the only thing that has me a little concerned at this point is the initial start-up.  I really want to have a video of when that day comes and I simply cannot blow that opportunity - it only comes around once.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in A HOT Doo Dah

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now