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AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


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I think Morgan has it  

 

The engine builder will be able to confirm.  If correct, then there are oil feed holes in the troughs

 

In 1923, the troughs and pan are stamped.  Oil is fed to each trough from above via a 6 tube 'pipe organ' coming from the oil pump.  All this is affixed to the block internally.

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The shift tower is back in place.  One quart of the SAE 250wt Gear Oil was just right to fill the case.  I also added 1 tablespoon of #2 Flake Graphite before things were buttoned up.  The service brake linkage needs to have the cotter pins separated.  Once that is done I think I can safely say that the engine and transmission are completed.  This has been a long time getting to this point.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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To beat a dead horse..... The last time I had the pan off my E-45 I wanted to know just what the oil levels were as indicated by the gage. I filled the pan to the various indicated marks on the gage.

This is what the oil level looked like with the gage at full.  You can just see the gage at the lower right.

Not much below the edge of the troughs.

(I had forgotten I had done this)

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Here is a photo of a Buick Engineering Drawing.  This is a full scale sectional drawing of the D-Series 6-Cylinder Engine.  It details absolutely nothing about the oil lines or tubes in the oil pan.  This drawing was done in June of 1916 and this is a drawing for the 1917 models engine.  The reason for it being a 1917 engine is that there are no grease cups in the rocker arm posts.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The mystery has been cleared up about the oil pan.  I had a good visit with Tighe Hallowell this afternoon.  He revealed to me that our engine was the earliest 6-Cylinder Buick engine that he has worked on.  He told me that the cast Aluminum pan was the first one of those that he had seen.  There is an oil galley that fills the dipper troughs (Mr. Wright pointed this out in a posting) that my two photos just barely show.  The function of the oil pump in this engine is to send oil up to the sight gauge in the dash panel and then gravity drains it back down to the back end of the oil pan where it fills the galley.  That is it for the oil pump function.  The pump is just a circulator for the oil in the pan.  Tighe did say that he was concerned about the main bearings on the initial start-up since there are no feed lines to them.  The mains are supplied with oil simply from the internal splashing.  I told him that I wanted to 'run' the engine with this big drill motor that I have to get things filled and really slopped around inside real good.  He did say that the other way would be to overfill the pan to fill the troughs and then drain the excess.  He told me that what I wanted to do would work just fine.  The photo that I am posting here shows the clean-out plug for the oil galley in the front of the pan.  He told me also that he made absolutely sure that the galley line was good and clean before things were buttoned back up.  After talking with Tighe I have a very good understanding now about how this engine works on the bottom end.  I really hope that this has helped with the questions that some of you had.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Before my first start, I took the pan off and squirted "Liquid Wrench Lubricant" (NOT the regular liquid wrench) up on the main and rod bearings, and the camshaft bearings, and into the wrist pins. The "lubricant" in that product is "Cerflon" which is their brand of teflon PTFE. You really can't go wrong with teflon.

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Terry - Isn't that double parallel line in the B/P, running from just in front of the oil pump, across the "tops" of the troughs, in the cutaway portion of engineering drawing, the tube in question?  Tube with similar function is removable in C-25 engine.

Regards;

Rick 

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Rick,

I believe that you are right about what you are looking at.  Here is the problem though.  As I pointed out about the drawing, this engine is a 1917.  Our engine has the cast Aluminum pan and the drawing is detailing a stamped steel pan.  There was/is a big difference between the two.  Here are a couple of photos of Bill Krause's oil pan for his 1916 D-45.  This is like the drawing and as you can see, there is a big difference between the two.  Changes were being made very early on in the 1916 production year and this happened to be one of the many that were made.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Got the headlights and tie bar back in place this afternoon.  We also got the front seat cushion put back in.  I will get some more photos tomorrow.  Getting the cushion back in the car freed up space in the hallway linen closet.  I don't know about the rest of you guys out there, but I have had parts stored under our bed, in the closets, and back of the sofa in the living room.  Painted parts really need particular care and storage until needed.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Got the headlights and tie bar back in place this afternoon.  We also got the front seat cushion put back in.  I will get some more photos tomorrow.  Getting the cushion back in the car freed up space in the hallway linen closet.  I don't know about the rest of you guys out there, but I have had parts stored under our bed, in the closets, and back of the sofa in the living room.  Painted parts really need particular care and storage until needed.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I keep my repainted parts on a table, under a sheet, ready to be reinstalled someday. 

 

Someday... 

 

Congratulations on your progress Terry! 

 

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I pulled the front tires off the wheels and in the next couple of days I will get them scrubbed up while we have this 70+ degree weather.  I never did this when I mounted the tires on the rims.  Time to get this done.  I will detail the wheels out and get the tires remounted back on the wheels.  Big lawn and leaf bags should keep things good and clean until it is time to come down off the blocks.  Here is a photo of the front seat cushion back in place.  Gary Martin did an absolutely beautiful job with the upholstery work in this car.  It's on to the rear axle now.  I am going to rework the brake rods before it goes back under the car.  This beautiful Fall weather is not going to last much longer, so I am going to push to get as much done as possible before the cold puts a stop to working on things.  Barbara and I are going to run the drill motor on the engine on Wednesday afternoon.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Edited by Terry Wiegand (see edit history)
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We have a drop dead gorgeous day going on out here in Doo Dah.  The high is in the low 60's, so,  it was the perfect day to get the oil pump primed and the dipper troughs filled.  Barbara helped me and we got a short video of what happened with that humongous drill motor.  My original thought was to get things in place and pull the trigger for about 4 or 5 minutes.  After about 30 seconds I saw that that was not going to happen.  I put the transmission in reverse gear and took the stick off the clutch pedal.  My thinking there was that would get things stirred up pretty well in the transmission case.  The next thing to be concerned about was the sight gauge on the dashboard.  The connections were perfect and not a hint of a leak anywhere in the oil lines.  What we ended up doing was running the drill motor 16 separate times  for 30 to 40 seconds each time.  We got good oil flow through the sight gauge each and every time.  I am here to tell you that that drill motor is a mankiller.  The torque on that thing is ungodly.  We think that we got a pretty good short video.  As soon as we can figure out just how to get it downloaded (I think that is the proper term to use here) I will get it posted on the thread.  We both feel very good about the result that was experienced.  I simply was not going to dry start this engine without doing this and run the risk of ruining everything.  Stay tuned.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

Edited by Terry Wiegand (see edit history)
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Think of your computer / phone / iPad as being on the ground, and the internet being up in the sky somewhere (which is kinda true).   Same reason when you backup your computer to The Cloud, it's "up" in the internet, somewhere. 

 

So you "up" load from your device to the internet, and "down" load from the internet to your device. 

 

Looking forward to the video of this drill in action! 

 

(To the computer guru's, yes I know the internet is actually servers on the ground somewhere, I just think of it as I described to keep it simple for my simple mind.) 

Edited by 27donb (see edit history)
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Terry, 

      I have a similar drill to yours that we use for mixing thinset and any other serious drilling job.  The nickname for our drill is "The widowmaker".  Glad that you are past that phase and are now capable of sending a recording.      Looking forward to the video.  By the way, your upholstery work is top shelf.        Hugh     

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1 hour ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Am looking for a quick technical answer - we have the videos ready to post on this thread.  The SD Card is 8GB.  Both of the videos run about 40 - 50 seconds each.  Can these be downloaded without any problems?

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

I don't have the answer. 

 

The quality of the videos determine their actual size.  The fact that the two videos fit on a 8gb card doesn't necessarily mean the two videos total 8gb in size. 

 

The website will not allow you to upload a video or picture that is too large, so I say try uploading a video and see what happens!  It will either work and upload, or it won't! 

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I am going to give this a try with the first of the two short videos.  If it doesn't come out right I'll delete it and start over.  Keep this thought in mind - I'm just a lowly toolmaker who enjoys old Buicks.  This high tech computer stuff is way above my pay grade.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Sorry guys.  I cannot attach either video because it says it is in excess of 9.77 MB.  This is really a bummer because for being the very first time that we ever tried getting something down on video we cannot share it.  We cannot even send it to others via email.  We thought that they turned out pretty well for a couple of amateurs.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,

I can’t help much (and WILL delete this post later) but I was under the impression that videos cannot be downloaded directly to this site at all — they must be downloaded to a 3d party site (if that’s the correct term) such as YouTube.

Come to think of it, the ONLY videos I’ve ever seen posted on this site were links to YouTube. Many were 20 minutes long or more.

I’d send this as a ‘Private Message’ but I’d actually like to hear some clarification on this as I have several little videos on my phone that I’d like to one day post.

There is not a way to download videos directly to this site - is that correct?

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Ben,

I am in brand new territory here.  This high tech computer stuff leaves me in the dark.  Precision Machining and Quality Control was how I made my living for almost 40 years.  In looking back, I have not heard much about the posting of videos on here.  I know that it has been done and I have seen a few, however, I know nothing about how it was done.  That is all going to have to change for me.  I want to able to shoot a video of when this engine is started for the first time.  I have some time to learn just how that will be done.  You are right - one cannot download a video directly to this site.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I want to back up for a bit and talk a little more about the dipper troughs in the oil pan.  My friend, Keith Townsend, down in North Carolina, is restoring a 1916 D-45 also.  He had sent me a CD with photos of the work he was doing on his car.  This photo of the oil pan clearly shows the oil galley in the pan that my photos didn't.  I think that this should help explain what goes on with the oil flow.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Go to youtube and click the + sign at the top, click upload video, and drop the movie file in that screen. You might have to get a google email account (gmail account), youtube is owned by google.

 

Set the computer so it doesn't automatically turn off or sleep, if it's a laptop plug it in, because you have to wait an hour or two for a 20 minute video to upload.

.

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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