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AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


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I got the hood sills put back together and tomorrow I will get the hood lacing placed on them.  My son-in-law is going to help me get the steering column put back in Saturday.  The transmission is going to be the next order of business.  That needs to go back on the engine so that the battery box and exhaust system can be put back in place.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The steering column is back in place.  This allowed for the re-installation of the return oil line coming from the sight gauge in the dash.  Having that oil line back in place will now allow filling the crankcase with oil.  One thing leads to another and the progress can seem slow at times , but, nonetheless we keep moving forward.  The next thing is getting on the transmission and getting it back in place.  If it would only cool down and that blasted humidity back off, a person would feel like getting some things done.

 

Terry Wiegand

Out in HOT Doo Dah 

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Plating question about steering mast.

I see Terrys is plated. My E-45, built in 1917, mast is painted black and shows no signs of ever have been plated. However the steeing nast on my parts car, built in 1918, does have remnants of plating.

Any explanations / ideas. Might this be due to WW I shortages and production changes?

 

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My steering mast has remnants of brass plating, you might be able to see it in the above pic. My steering box is painted black because it came out of the parts car which was restored and painted decades ago.

 

It ironic that the car that was once restored is the parts car but the car that has never been restored is......still unrestored.

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Don,

To comment on your question about the plating.  Please keep in mind that 1963 was 57 years ago, but there are some things that are still stuck in the memory.  I helped my Dad that Winter when he went through the front end on this car.  The steering column tube was plated.  He took that and several other parts and pieces with them on vacation and dropped them off at a place in Denver called Industrial Hard Chrome Plating.  They did a really nice job with the plating and what you see in the photos is how it turned out.  I will say this - every 1916 and 1917 D-45 that I have ever had the chance to look at has had a plated steering column.  WW1 I'm sure had some production restrictions on what went on with companies who were contractors for the military.  It is still interesting though.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Rod,

I did not find any evidence of there ever being any paint on it.  My thinking is "where does a person stop with something like this?"  I am going to wipe the box down with a Marvel Mystery Oil soaked shop cloth and then go over it with a clean and dry shop towel.  That'll be good enough for me.  I do not remember any paint being on the box when I cleaned it up the first time back in 1963.  I'm just not going to get in a twist over it.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I have two other complete steering gear assemblies for these cars and they are all grey cast iron.  One thing that is interesting about these cars at this time is that all of the major assemblies had a serial number.  The front axle, the steering gear, the starter/generator, the transmission, and the rear axle all had a serial number assigned to them.  How long Buick stayed with this is something that I do not have an answer for.  If a person looks close at the steering box in the one photo they will see the serial number stamped into it.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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  • 2 weeks later...

I got the drag link reconnected yesterday.  My helper assisted with getting the exhaust system back in place after lunch this afternoon.  I need to restock my supply of cotter pins.  The cutout plunger is held in place by a brass cotter key and I am fresh out of the one to do that.  Putting the exhaust system back in place WILL allow the transmission to go back in without any problems.  Not so with the battery box.  The top toe board has been put back in place so that the foot throttle linkage can be reconnected.  The choke tube assembly has been put back in place and connected to the butterfly shaft on the carburetor.  Rebuilding that muffler was a story all by itself.  It came out real well I might add.

I think my jury duty might be coming to an end - I do not have to report again until the 11th.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry, 

   What you have is all coming along nicely.  I wanted to make an observation about your steering box that I noticed on my car and some other engine photos that I have seen of unrestored engines and engine bays.  Your steering box looks to have some remnants of greyish paint still on it.  My steering box had the same kind of remnants still on it (second photo).  As for the green/grey on the engine block, that Bill Hirsch supplies, I have not seen one of our engines with quite so much green and brightness in it, but I have seen engine colors that lean closer to the grey color like you have showing.  Only reason I mention this is that you still have to put some dressing on the steel to keep the rust at bay if you chose not to paint it, but that appears to be original paint on it to me which you can also display.   Keep up the good work.     Hugh  

 

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Hugh,

Thanks for the compliments.  I just haven't gotten the steering box wiped down yet - I'll get it.  As I said earlier - where does a person stop with something like this?  This car was/is so complete and original that I am not going to do a body-off-the-frame restoration on it.  Here is a photo of the paint can that I got from Hirsch.  I asked those folks when I ordered the paint if they had anything going back earlier for Buick.  This is the only paint that they sell for early Buicks.  As far as any paint residue on the steering box - your eyeballs must be a whole lot better than mine.  I have cleaned that box twice in 57 years and I haven't found or seen anything that came close to paint either time.  I will  post a photo after I get it wiped down with MMO and we can see what it looks like then.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I tried to make a little more progress early this evening.  I had the guys at Classic Carburetors process the Hot Air Muff for me when they went through the carburetor for this engine.  You have heard me say that this car is one of the most complete and original D-45's that I have ever had the good fortune to be around and go over.  When I sent the parts and pieces down to them, I get a phone call from Larry asking me what in the world this was.  I sent him photos from the Illustrated Parts Catalog detailing the parts and describing them.  He told me that in all of the years that they rebuilt Marvel Brass-Bodied Carburetors they had never, ever seen this part of the fuel system.  He said that they did not know that this part of the fuel system existed for a Marvel.  I am not trying to honk my own horn here - I just feel very fortunate that everything that was on this car when it left Flint was still with the car when my Dad got it.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,

 

That is a neat hootnanny. But, I think with modern fuels it has "vaporlock" writtn all over it.

On my E-45 I used to have fuel problems like vapor lock.

There is a tube from the exhaust manifold to the choke mechanism. I felt it might be transfering too much heat to the carb, so I rempved it (it lives under the seat now). The car ran much better that way and has been that way for many years.

Any one else do this?"

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Don, I think you are right about that.  It was on the engine and operational through July of 1976.  We didn't have this crap that tries to pass for fuel back then, so it is understandable that there weren't any problems.  I like your idea of putting it in the tool area under the front seat.  It sure is neat to have all the parts and pieces that the car left the factory with.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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6 hours ago, DonMicheletti said:

Terry,

 

That is a neat hootnanny. But, I think with modern fuels it has "vaporlock" writtn all over it.

On my E-45 I used to have fuel problems like vapor lock.

There is a tube from the exhaust manifold to the choke mechanism. I felt it might be transfering too much heat to the carb, so I rempved it (it lives under the seat now). The car ran much better that way and has been that way for many years.

Any one else do this?"

 

 

My car is extremely complete and has almost everything original, but it does NOT have the heat risers from the exhaust pipe to the carb. I think fuel was bad before WW I because the gasoline fraction of the crude was all being used up for automobiles, so they snuck some heavier stuff in the gas and Marvel came up with the carb heaters. So cars made before WWI had these crazy carburetor pre-heaters. But during WWI for the sake of the airplanes the fuel industry learned how to ->crack<- crude oil and coax more gasoline molecules out of it, after WWI the gas was better and people took those pre-heaters off their Marvel carbs because they didn't need them and ran better without them.

 

What year did Buick stop equipping its carbs with the pre heaters from the exhaust pipes? I'm not talking about heat riser tubes for the choke.

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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I got the intake manifold to vacuum tank fittings and line in place this afternoon.  The fuel line from the bottom of the tank over to the carburetor float bowl is going to have to wait until I can get an elbow fitting to have that work properly.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I ran into an unexpected problem with hooking up the wiring on the backside of the Starter/Generator unit this afternoon.  Getting the wiring in the correct places was rather easy.  The problem is that the two hex nuts that connect the wire from the #1 terminal in the combination switch to the stepped down threads on the stud on the back of the S/G unit are nowhere to be found.  Most folks would think that this is not a problem at all.  WRONG.  These two simple looking hex nuts are not the average threaded hex nuts.  They are not 1/4"-20, they are not 1/4"-28, they are not #12-24, and they are not metric threads.  I spoke with Larry DiBarry early this evening about the nuts that are AWOL and he thinks that he may be able to help me.  I need to point out that the threads on the stud are in very nice condition.  In other words, there is nothing to keep the proper hex nuts from threading right onto the stud.  IF anyone should happen to have two of these scarce hex nuts that they are willing to part with - I sure could use them.  Thanks for any and all help with this dilemma.  The photos shows where they go and the terminal that they secure.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I am sending as I write this 2 #14X24 nuts to Terry. This threaded posts on all of my S/Gs are .238 dia. The max O.D. for a #14X24 is to be .243.  The #14X24 thread fits perfectly on my units.

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15 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

I ran into an unexpected problem with hooking up the wiring on the backside of the Starter/Generator unit this afternoon.  Getting the wiring in the correct places was rather easy.  The problem is that the two hex nuts that connect the wire from the #1 terminal in the combination switch to the stepped down threads on the stud on the back of the S/G unit are nowhere to be found.  Most folks would think that this is not a problem at all.  WRONG.  These two simple looking hex nuts are not the average threaded hex nuts.  They are not 1/4"-20, they are not 1/4"-28, they are not #12-24, and they are not metric threads.  I spoke with Larry DiBarry early this evening about the nuts that are AWOL and he thinks that he may be able to help me.  I need to point out that the threads on the stud are in very nice condition.  In other words, there is nothing to keep the proper hex nuts from threading right onto the stud.  IF anyone should happen to have two of these scarce hex nuts that they are willing to part with - I sure could use them.  Thanks for any and all help with this dilemma.  The photos shows where they go and the terminal that they secure.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

 

 

 

I have these. Little rusty, but they are originals.

 

You want 'em?

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Morgan,

I don't think you are referring to the hex nuts that I am needing.  Please look at the photos that I posted again.  I am needing the two hex nuts on the 'stepped down' threaded portion of the  positive battery cable shaft.  I spoke with Larry DiBarry and he's got me covered for these little buggars.  Thanks for the offer.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I 'dry fit' the radiator assembly onto the frame this afternoon.  It needs to be set aside for a bit longer because I want to flush the block before things go together to stay.  I am just about done with everything from the firewall forward.  The transmission is next on the list.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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4 hours ago, Terry Wiegand said:

Morgan,

I don't think you are referring to the hex nuts that I am needing.  Please look at the photos that I posted again.  I am needing the two hex nuts on the 'stepped down' threaded portion of the  positive battery cable shaft.  I spoke with Larry DiBarry and he's got me covered for these little buggars.  Thanks for the offer.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

 

 

No it's the same one. The one you need in the below pictures, is nut A, the one that secures the wire from terminal 1, the ammeter. The one marked B secures the wire from terminal 2, the ignition. They are both the same size nuts and take a 7/16 wrench, but have different size holes. B takes a 10-32 hole and A, the one you need, has a bigger hole, even though it's the same size nut as B.

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I checked all this with my car, it has these same 2 nuts. Same 7/16 hex on the outside, different size holes inside. I can't tell you the inside hole size of nut A, because I don't have that tap in my set. It's smaller than 1/4 but bigger than # 10.

.

.

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)
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I got the 2, #14-24 Hex Nuts from Larry day before yesterday and they fit perfectly.  One more small step going forward.  I want to finish getting the vacuum tank fuel line in place this afternoon.  I need to hook up the foot throttle linkage on the carburetor and then the only thing left on the fuel system on that side of the engine will be connecting the fuel line from the gasoline tank to the vacuum tank.  It's getting there.  I owe Larry big time for those hex nuts.  I have been all over the internet and those things just aren't out there.  I have the tap for those threads and I was thinking that I was going to have to make them.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I'm a little behind on getting a few photos posted.  Here are a couple showing the hooked up foot throttle linkage and the fuel line from the vacuum tank to the carburetor float bowl.  Next thing is to flush the block before the radiator goes back in place and then it is get the transmission completely cleaned up and re-installed.  It just takes time.  I hope that Hugh notices that the steering box has been wiped down with MMO to cut down on any light surface rusting.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Well, it's on to the transmission now.  I pulled all of the old cotter pins, measured them, and made a written record of just what I will be needing.  Tomorrow I am going to completely disassemble the universal joint, clean it up and check it over carefully, then set it aside while I go to work on cleaning the case.  I am going to use K-1 Clear Kerosene along with the solvent gun to flush out the innards.  The emergency brake handle was sent out to Niagara Custom Plating to be replated.  That should be back home early next week.  I am going to post photos of the brake and clutch pedals once they are cleaned.  Everyone has heard me say that this car has had a very sheltered life and that I believe it has very low mileage for being 105 years old.  Please look at the pedals and draw your own conclusion.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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The torque tube yoke took the better part of an hour to clean 105 years worth of caked grease and crud off it.  The drive shaft universal joint is soaking in solvent with the hope that overnight things will come off a tad bit easier.  That old grease just does not give up easy.  

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Terry,    

   Attached is a photo of the oil coming out of my transmission.  The anticipation song they used for selling ketsup has nothing on this stuff.  Also, I was able to remove the nut behind the U joint on the transmission side, but the drive for the U joint did not want to come off the output shaft.  I don't want to bang on the bearings for fear of pitting the races, and the puller felt like it was not going to remove it.  I just retightened the nut and cleaned out the best I could under the assumption that the first oil change will do the cleaning.  Sometimes it is safer not to disassemble some of these parts if they do not cooperate easily.  These are pretty good transmissions and mainly just need a fluid change.  Also there are 3 thrust washer inside the input shaft.   These are a loose fitting part and you should be aware that they are in there as I was glad that I cleaned the gunk out that held them in place.  Easy to miss stuff like this when there is no exploded view.        Hugh

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Hugh,

 

Before I pulled the transmission I set a 5-gallon bucket under it and let it drain into that for several days.  What came out really wasn't all that bad.  It certainly didn't look like the 'tar' that you had in yours.  My son-in-law helped me pull it out from under the car.  When we got it out to where a person could see what was going, his comment to me was, "that thing looks like it came out of a ton and a half truck!".  I believe that flushing out the case with Kerosene is all that I am going to have to do before I refill it with the new oil.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Today was the test of everything that has gone back on the engine.  The boss and I tested the water jacket with hot water to flush the block one last time before the radiator goes into place.  We have hot and cold running water plumbed to our East driveway so as to be able to wash our vehicles anytime we wish.  We hooked the hose to my Doo Dah Engineering setup and away we went.  I cannot begin to tell everybody how glad I am that we did this.  I found a problem that would have been a mess had the anti-freeze been in the system.  At the very bottom of the flange for the water inlet tube on the side of the block there was a small leak.  Evidently when I ran the silicone bead around the bottom edge I did not get it covered good enough.  So, it was drain the block and pull the inlet tube and reseal it.  I will try it again tomorrow after the new silicone cures out.  The top water outlet tube flange connections were good.  The three packing nuts on the water pump were dry as a bone, the water pump cover on the pump housing was good, and lastly, the drain fittings on the block and water pump housing did not drip a drop.  Will report our results tomorrow.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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There is great news to report this morning.  The water jacket on the engine is liquid tight at all possible leak points.  We ran about 100 gallons or so of hot water through the block.  After seeing that there were no leaks, I went out and watched what was coming out.  The water was nice and clear and I believe that we are safe to set the radiator and hood back in place.  I cannot begin to express how glad I am that the leak was caught before putting the coolant into the system.  Now, it's get back on the transmission.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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