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1933 what was a Dodge status symbolized as? rich or poor

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I am jumping down the current YOU TUBE rabbit hole with prohabition and 1920s-30s depression knowledge. and I am curious. 

 

WHAT WAS A DODGE BROTHERS car worth, what would status be if you had a 33 Dodge new / old used/off show room? was it something everyone could afford or something the rich could only have? 

 

lets talk about it, I am wondering what knowledge you have on this issue.? 

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http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/30scars.html

 

https://mclib.info/reference/local-history-genealogy/historic-prices/1933-2/

 

Make up a table from

http://www.classiccardatabase.com/search.php?year=1933&make=Dodge&series=544

 

Here is some information from the last web site above. I think you would have to say the 1933 Dodge DP is in the lower segment of the market.

 

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Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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To begin with, Prohibition ended in January 1933, so the owner of a new Dodge might have gone out for a beer in his new car but not much more. Who bought a new Dodge depended on where you were in the U.S. In rural areas of the country maybe a pharmacist or a bank vice president would have bought a new Dodge, but remember that agriculture was a large part of the economy. In the hinterland many if not most agricultural was on subsistence farms, that is, people literally subsisted on what the farm produced. The people grew their own vegetables, ate the pork, beef or poultry they raised. A farmer might work off the farm in order to buy the things he could not produce himself such as sugar or gasoline if he was fortunate enough to own a tractor. If the crops didn't produce, the family went hungry. To further your understanding of the times I would suggest reading about the Dust Bowl era. No relief, no food stamps, no assistance of any kind. If you were destitute your best hope was that family would take you in.  My grandfather once told me that none of his neighbors noticed the crash of 1929 because they were still reeling from the agricultural crash of 1918.

In large metropolitan areas, successful shop owners,mid-level managers or doctors might buy a Dodge. Remember that 1933 was the worst year of the Great Depression.  Something like 25 per cent of the workforce was out of a job. Times were tough. Even if you could afford a new car you might not buy one so as not to seem ostentatious.

To summarize, times were tough in 1933. If you could afford any new car you were doing pretty darn well. Most of the country was suffering more than any of us will ever know. 

Sorry to be so long winded. Zeke 

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The Dodge car was definitely a step up the ladder from Ford and Chevy, both of which competed with the Plymouth.  The heirarchy at Chrysler Corp. was Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto, Chrysler, and then Imperial.  On the GM side it was Chevy, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, LaSalle, and then Cadillac.  

 

But these are all cars that ordinary people bought.  There was a whole other market for the rich and very rich.  Packard, Pierce Arrow, and <gasp> Duesenberg.  A Duesenberg *chassis* with grille and hood cost around $8000.00 and then you had it shipped to a coachbuilder for a body/interior.  A finished car might cost upward of $20000.00 (when a new Ford cost $500!).  But buyers of that type of car were few and far between.  Just as buyers of the Bugatti Veyron are few and far between today.

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22 minutes ago, Pete in PA said:

The Dodge car was definitely a step up the ladder from Ford and Chevy, both of which competed with the Plymouth.  The heirarchy at Chrysler Corp. was Plymouth, Dodge, DeSoto, Chrysler, and then Imperial.  On the GM side it was Chevy, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, LaSalle, and then Cadillac.  

 

But these are all cars that ordinary people bought.  There was a whole other market for the rich and very rich.  Packard, Pierce Arrow, and <gasp> Duesenberg.  A Duesenberg *chassis* with grille and hood cost around $8000.00 and then you had it shipped to a coachbuilder for a body/interior.  A finished car might cost upward of $20000.00 (when a new Ford cost $500!).  But buyers of that type of car were few and far between.  Just as buyers of the Bugatti Veyron are few and far between today.

 

This. The Dodge was being aimed at the same type of people that were looking at Pontiac or Oldsmobile.

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My grand father bought a brand new Dodge in 34.

My dad used to talk about how his dad went broke a few times is his lifetime.

He did end up with a business that took off and did pretty well. But that would have been somewhat later than this.

Dad told the story of his family driving the new Dodge from Seattle to Michigan and back and 'never had to lay a wrench on it'.

Here it is with my dad at the wheel at age 16 and his brother at age 14.

The math tells me that the Dodge would have been new then.

My grandma used to make my brother and myself dress up like this when we spent time with her.

 

FJs 34 Dodge.jpg

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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19 minutes ago, Spinneyhill said:

The Fashion in 1934! Very snappy.

 

Love the pin stripe along the bottom edge!

 

Grandma liked her boys to be all dressed up.

She was always taking us shopping.

I always thought is was just my brother and I (grand sons) until this pic came to the surface.

She passed when I was about twenty, I never looked very snappy after that.

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Your Grandma was just like mine. She always called me out if I was dressed poorly. Her generation of ladies always carried two pairs of gloves when going out, in case the first got soiled. Gives me a warm feeling thinking about those times!

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