1940Super

1940 Buick Super Restoration

Recommended Posts

Repainted the rims and added the silver stripes. First attempt was with a brush, using a jack to keep the brush steady and turning the wheel on the axle as the paint was applied. Started off okay but then the paint would thin out on the brush and more paint on the brush needed and was difficult keeping a consistent width from stopping to starting again. Even worse for the thinner outer lines. Decided to go with paint marker pens and was able to do a complete rotation of the wheel with a much more consistent width. Sprayed a clear coat over the top. 

PhotoGrid_1558188801077.thumb.jpg.0d3fa794870fb47532ea696ae04f5b08.jpg

Top left was using brush for wider line. Bottom were done with the marker pens

PhotoGrid_1558188654622.thumb.jpg.d7882e2b51db6f75641d6dc1a239de68.jpg

End result

PhotoGrid_1558187293114.thumb.jpg.311645f573ba6a2808dd9c8276cd0837.jpg

The before photo

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The tyres are about 20-25 years old. Tread barely worn. Should I be worried about the rubber deteriorating?

Is it possible to hide tyre weights under the metal trim? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
  1. Very much so , max for tires is 12 years . Start going bad after 6 year years. 20 year old tyres very dangerous. It's the rubber that goes bad just setting.
Edited by Gary Best (see edit history)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the type of tire, and how they were cared for.  Usually not a good idea, but good bias tires kept indoors can last a very long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Gary Best said:
  1. Very much so , max for tires is 12 years . Start going bad after 6 year years. 20 year old tyres very dangerous. It's the rubber that goes bad just setting.

Thanks, i will definitely look at getting new ones. Would be a disaster to have a crash after restoring a car because the old tyres were kept

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, 39BuickEight said:

Depends on the type of tire, and how they were cared for.  Usually not a good idea, but good bias tires kept indoors can last a very long time.

You are probably right. They have been indoors the whole time, I was driving on them 7 years ago however i dont think it's worth the risk to continue using them now

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tires deteriorate most quickly on the inside. Oxygen is what does it. UV has some effect, but it is mostly oxidation that deteriorates tires. We have had this discussion on these fora before. Ask the www about it.

 

On the inside, the pressure is over two atmospheres, whereas on the outside it is one, so there is more oxygen inside.

 

I have recently replaced my tires, mainly because they were too hard to work with and being oversize, I decided was a bit hard on the old 3.5" locking ring rims.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

Tires deteriorate most quickly on the inside. Oxygen is what does it. UV has some effect, but it is mostly oxidation that deteriorates tires. We have had this discussion on these fora before. Ask the www about it.

 

On the inside, the pressure is over two atmospheres, whereas on the outside it is one, so there is more oxygen inside.

 

I have recently replaced my tires, mainly because they were too hard to work with and being oversize, I decided was a bit hard on the old 3.5" locking ring rims.

 

I have a question,  unless you put pure nitrogen in the tires on installation and even then the air in the tire will still have some oxygen, the makeup of the atmosphere is about by volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.04% carbon, how can you have more oxygen in the inside of the tire than on the outside? 

 

The air is at just a higher pressure. usually 2-3 atmospheres which is in the 30-45 psi or about 200-300 kpa. 

 

Higher moisture content in the air might change it a little bit, but I do not think much.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

2 atmospheres = 2 x as much air in the same space (remember you added air to make the pressure rise?) = 2x as much oxygen and pressure will force the oxygen further into the tire compounds.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

2 atmospheres = 2 x as much air in the same space (remember you added air to make the pressure rise?) = 2x as much oxygen and pressure will force the oxygen further into the tire compounds.

 

Yes, but does it not push 2 x as much nitrogen into the tire compounds also which is 78% of the pressurized air?

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When you replace your tires , I recommend filling with nitrogen as that will help extend the life of the rubber. Still will not last forever but helps. As Larry said it's the oxygen that does a lot of the damage . Also UV rays . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

Yes, but does it not push 2 x as much nitrogen into the tire compounds also which is 78% of the pressurized air? 

It is the oxygen that causes oxidation of the tire. 2 x as much oxygen = 2 x as much oxidation. Nitrogen doesn't prevent it. Filling your tires with nitrogen just removes the oxygen.

 

A little quote for you from https://www.thoughtco.com/the-science-of-tire-aging-3234377:

“Tires are primarily degrading from the inside-out, due [to] permeation and reaction of the pressurized oxygen within the tire structure, with rates proportional to temperature.” - Summary of NHTSA Tire Aging Test Development Research

 

Tire aging is an issue of oxidation. As rubber is exposed to oxygen, it dries out and becomes stiffer, leading to cracking. The issue is primarily about how the inner, “wedge” layers of rubber oxidize."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the inside of tires, the pressure is 3 atmospheres not 2. Gauge pressure is 2, plus one is 3.

 

Gauge pressure of 30 means 45 inside and 15 outside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/19/2019 at 9:36 AM, 1940Super said:

is it possible to hide tyre weights under the metal trim? 

 

When I had my new tires mounted, the service man really wanted not to have weights on the outside of the wheel for aesthetics.  But he also told me that the tire balance will be much better if the weights are applied to both the outer and inner rims, so I had the weights installed where they would function best,  both on the outer and inner aspect of the wheel.  When all done, and that blue stuff cleaned off the new tires, I simply painted the weights black, and visually they disappear.  

 

I really like your pin striping!  Nice job!

 

DSC_0671.thumb.jpg.2ab6cdba4e5b8249020275f414b1e3be.jpg.62206f2ce2ed0b60356dfafc5459a43e.jpg

After painting the weights, installing the hubcap and beauty ring, the weights kinda disappear.

 

 

IMG_9916.thumb.JPG.00953c9c375f0680a84319c55b158353.JPG.166aca5c50a3178aea7031091b421f69.JPG

Before and after.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's the link to that day:

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @Gary W.

 

I didn't think to paint the weights black. You barely notice them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now