1940Super

1940 Buick Super Restoration

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That photo looks like the original brake line clips on my 1937 and 1938 Centurys, so I suspect they would be correct for your car as well.

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8 hours ago, MCHinson said:

That photo looks like the original brake line clips on my 1937 and 1938 Centurys, so I suspect they would be correct for your car as well.

Thank you, it's what were on my car too but most of them broken. I wondered if they were a later replacement as all the ones I see online say there are for 1960s mopar car

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I totally disassembled a 1938 Century project that had obviously never been apart and all of the brake line clips are that style. 

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20181227_111012.thumb.jpg.9dd8acf4dc92992ac8b154dcac9641e3.jpg20181227_111003.thumb.jpg.79f0953f6cbc3e87fd7f0a9026908809.jpgold book, but still in business. Trunk lid spring (1759)not listed in newer catalog. Not open till after New year, but I'm gonna call to ask if they can still get 1759 which is approx $22 from Chevs of 40s. Many gm clips with photo ID included. Recommended.

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All the rear and front suspension have been re bolted to the chassis. Because there is no weight on the front without the engine using a jack was not enough to compress the front coil so I used to long threaded rod to slowly raise the lower control arm. 

IMG_20181228_080225_956.thumb.jpg.9748861580475cf9a7439eb928f1eaaa.jpgPhotoGrid_1546331061096.thumb.jpg.90a7b9f9c571e7a78bab0387c571d519.jpg

 

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PhotoGrid_1546332015089.thumb.jpg.78a0ade3fb7285732a8ee1ad114edda8.jpg20190101_193510.thumb.jpg.fde5ce4a74a949a1568b722aef6b436f.jpg

I assume the body weight will correct the centering of the rear axle to the chassis?

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Tonight I'm finishing bending new brake lines then set up the motor for another test run

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Brake lines finished, just waiting for the authentic style clips to arrive to install. The 2 lines to the front brakes were fine, just needed a clean. The 3 lines to the back brakes were very corroded and the pipes broke when try to release some of the nuts.

 1250985115_20190104_174628(2).thumb.jpg.6d368097a08499d268967960629ad208.jpg

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I'd like the get the engine re installed on the chassis but I want to set it up for another test run first. When I first removed the motor I had it sent to a re conditioner to rebuild the engine internally with just about everything being replaced with new or NORS parts. Originally the plan was to reinstall the motor after the rebuild but then I got carried away external details of the engine. I wanted to made it look as period correct as possible so I did a lot of research. Some of the little things likes pipe clips, flywheel inspection cover and distributor clamps I made myself because I couldn't find replacements. When it was finished a borrowed a friends camera and edited out the background on some shots.

If you can spot something that doesn't look right please me know and i'll try to rectify it.1475608737_finaledit.thumb.jpg.bc565887e55d9e1a3a260960cc40a786.jpgIMG_20170702_011812_854.thumb.jpg.6ca054eb52df807e37c9927a2028f74c.jpgleft.thumb.jpg.2cac188253debb93f31b9e820e140085.jpgright.thumb.jpg.bfa5673a69d2d79217c1bd21bb82fbb0.jpg20170702002645.thumb.JPG.6e66079263a0ee303a1c3180a62c645c.JPG

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On ‎1‎/‎1‎/‎2019 at 3:52 AM, 1940Super said:

20190101_193510.thumb.jpg.fde5ce4a74a949a1568b722aef6b436f.jpg

I assume the body weight will correct the centering of the rear axle to the chassis?

 

If I understand geometry correctly, the only thing that body weight would change would be the "level" of the frame to the ground, not if the frame to axle is centered to the frame.

 

The two measurements that you would need to check would be to find the center of the frame and the center of the axle which I would guess would be the top bolt of the  center of the axle.  Put a regular carpenters level on the top of the frame and see if it is level.  If it is not then add weight to the side of the frame that makes the frame level. Once the frame is level, then put your plumb bob on the center mark of the frame and see if the weight aligns with the center of the axle.

 

The only dimension that the body would change would be the levelness of the frame to the ground.  If when everything is together and the trim height is different from side to side measuring at the top of each wheel well opening, then you would look to change springs to bring the car into level.

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1 hour ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

If I understand geometry correctly, the only thing that body weight would change would be the "level" of the frame to the ground, not if the frame to axle is centered to the frame.

 

The two measurements that you would need to check would be to find the center of the frame and the center of the axle which I would guess would be the top bolt of the  center of the axle.  Put a regular carpenters level on the top of the frame and see if it is level.  If it is not then add weight to the side of the frame that makes the frame level. Once the frame is level, then put your plumb bob on the center mark of the frame and see if the weight aligns with the center of the axle.

 

The only dimension that the body would change would be the levelness of the frame to the ground.  If when everything is together and the trim height is different from side to side measuring at the top of each wheel well opening, then you would look to change springs to bring the car into level.

 

Larry, I believe his concern is with the effects of the Panhard Rod on the rear suspension geometry and alignment at curb weight trim height.

 

Lots of good basic articles on 3 and 4 link rear suspensions with Panhard Rods on the internet.  They are still used today and common with hotrod chassis builders.

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45 minutes ago, Larry Schramm said:

 

If I understand geometry correctly, the only thing that body weight would change would be the "level" of the frame to the ground, not if the frame to axle is centered to the frame.

 

The two measurements that you would need to check would be to find the center of the frame and the center of the axle which I would guess would be the top bolt of the  center of the axle.  Put a regular carpenters level on the top of the frame and see if it is level.  If it is not then add weight to the side of the frame that makes the frame level. Once the frame is level, then put your plumb bob on the center mark of the frame and see if the weight aligns with the center of the axle.

 

The only dimension that the body would change would be the levelness of the frame to the ground.  If when everything is together and the trim height is different from side to side measuring at the top of each wheel well opening, then you would look to change springs to bring the car into level.

 

Thanks for the response Larry. 

 

I had checked the frame with a level and it was pretty level. The reason I assume it would center itself under wight is because of the radius rod. The rod is a fixed specified length and anchored at an angle to the left side of frame and to the right side of axle housing. My understanding is if the springs compress the angle of the rod becomes smaller causing the frame and axle to move in opposite directions. I believe Buick would have determined the length of the radius rod to center the axle to frame under normal curb weight.

Matt

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My 1939 looked the same without weight on it.  The front springs didn't compress until the body and rest of the metal went on.  The engine wasn't even enough.  I could stand on it with the engine and they would move.

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8 hours ago, 39BuickEight said:

My 1939 looked the same without weight on it.  The front springs didn't compress until the body and rest of the metal went on.  The engine wasn't even enough.  I could stand on it with the engine and they would move.

 

I thought the engine weight alone would have done it but then I did use a formwork prop to push down on the frame against the shed roof and the roof started to move first so I doesn't surprise me. I was going to ask you how you fitted your bumper stops and seals on the lower control arms because I saw you still have the rivets in place?

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On 1/4/2019 at 2:04 AM, 1940Super said:

Brake lines finished, just waiting for the authentic style clips to arrive to install. The 2 lines to the front brakes were fine, just needed a clean. The 3 lines to the back brakes were very corroded and the pipes broke when try to release some of the nuts.

 

Where did you go to get the authentic clips? 

 

I stripped a car that did not appear to have been restored, altered or mechanically rebuilt and found two different clip styles holding the rear brake lines onto the trailing arms of the torque tube assembly. As others have said, things happen in assembly that just get the new car further down the assembly line.  I'll go for all the same style though.

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What type of finish did you apply to the oil filter, fuel pump and gas and vacuum lines?

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8 hours ago, kgreen said:

Where did you go to get the authentic clips? 

 

I stripped a car that did not appear to have been restored, altered or mechanically rebuilt and found two different clip styles holding the rear brake lines onto the trailing arms of the torque tube assembly. As others have said, things happen in assembly that just get the new car further down the assembly line.  I'll go for all the same style though.

 

The Parts Place Inc

 

https://www.thepartsplaceinc.com/product/1948/1948-buick-full-size-br-push-in-3-8-spring-clip-for-metal-lines-set-of-10-black/81095

 

If you order direct from their site you need to spend a $19 minimum but they also sell them through Ebay too.

 

The fuel lines are 1/4 inch but the trailing arms have the armor spring wrap to the clip size is 3/8th. I also ordered some of their 1/4 inch J clips. I found ones I had ordered from Bob's didn't fit properly on the pipe. I had a couple from CARS, they were a better fit.

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8 hours ago, kgreen said:

What type of finish did you apply to the oil filter, fuel pump and gas and vacuum lines?

 

For the oil filter I used KBS Silver Rust Seal with KBS Clear Diamond finish over the top. I was using the rust seal to undercoat the chassis and thought it looked suitable for an 'Aluminium lacquered' as stated for the oil filter in the Buick Facts 1940. An earlier version of the filter that has a seam at the bottom was painted black according to 1940 Service Bulletin. 

I painted the gas and vacuum lines are the same finish as the oil filter but when I take them off i'll probably spray them a with something a closer colour to bare steel to differentiate from the filter.

The fuel pump is a clear coat of KBS diamond finish over the bare metel

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22 hours ago, 39BuickEight said:

I used a spring compressor to release the tension.

PhotoGrid_1498044981965_LI.thumb.jpg.bd230d5ac84fe5d68b4eee99e1b9d75d.jpg

I mean these. The only way I could see as fitting them was to drill out the rivets, fit in the rubber shaft seals and bump stop and bolt back together. The 39 looks the same?

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Matt,
The engine looks absolutely stunning !
Did you do the bypass valve modification that stops engine overheating ?
That is where you install a "frost plug" in place of the OEM bypass valve (under the thermostat) and drill a 1/4" hole in it.
It is done so that the water coming up the radiator hose does not "overpower" the water coming out of the head.

Also, did you take the little screen out of the head where the oil line from the bottom of the filter runs up to the front of the head and lubes the rockers ?
Many of us do that just to make sure we get lube oil upstairs.

Mike in frozen Colorado

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Quote

 

The pictures, below, are 1941 Buicks being assembled in Linden, New Jersey, USA.  The 1940 Buick engine is likely painted in the same fashion - - - Engine color on the manifolds, a cadmium plated water pump pulley, the harmonic damper is fitted after the engine painting (but not sure of the color), the exhaust pipes are painted chassis black, the generator mounting bracket is painted engine color, and the fuel and vacuum lines are painted engine color.

1941 Buick Engine 3a.jpg

1941 Buick Engine.jpg

1941 Buick Engine 2.jpg

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Additional comments on the engine pictures I submitted (above) - - -

• The engine with the normal looking fan is a Special / Super engine.

• The engine with odd looking fan is a Century / Roadmaster engine.

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3 hours ago, 1940Super said:

PhotoGrid_1498044981965_LI.thumb.jpg.bd230d5ac84fe5d68b4eee99e1b9d75d.jpg

I mean these. The only way I could see as fitting them was to drill out the rivets, fit in the rubber shaft seals and bump stop and bolt back together. The 39 looks the same?

That is a part of much discussion.  Some cars have the rivets drilled out and replaced with bolts (some say dealers did this all the time back in the 40’s and 50’s when performing maintenance.). There are also 2 different versions on the shafts.  Some are threaded into the eye (and have a larger eyehole) and some have rubber in the eye hole.  Mine are threaded into the eyehole (like yours it appears, and if so, I would love to know how to order the correct seals).  When I ordered the seals, I was sent the incorrect ones and told my arms were incorrect for my car.  Many people have mixed and matched these over a few year period.  Apparently they fit many years.

 

As as far as putting the shaft back in I pried them apart.  I put one end in first, then used a giant screwdriver through the other hole for leverage and pulled while someone else got it started.

 

I told Dad we could drill the rivets out and replace them with bolts, but he didn’t like the idea of changing it.

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11 hours ago, FLYER15015 said:

Matt,
The engine looks absolutely stunning !
Did you do the bypass valve modification that stops engine overheating ?
That is where you install a "frost plug" in place of the OEM bypass valve (under the thermostat) and drill a 1/4" hole in it.
It is done so that the water coming up the radiator hose does not "overpower" the water coming out of the head.

Also, did you take the little screen out of the head where the oil line from the bottom of the filter runs up to the front of the head and lubes the rockers ?
Many of us do that just to make sure we get lube oil upstairs.

Mike in frozen Colorado

 

Hi Mike,

Thanks very much. No I left the bypass valve as it was. It seemed to make sense to me at the time of looking at it and reading about it in the manual. When you say overpower in the head do you mean before or after the thermostat opening?

When I first set up the engine for a test run it was overheating very quickly about 2 minutes after starting it. I thought it may have been the pump but i tested it and the pump was fine. I tested the thermostat and it was fine. What I think the problem was I had the thermostat upside down, I didn't take note of which was it was. I made sure it was the right way but and tested again today and I ran it for half an hour with the temperature sitting around 180 degrees.  

 

The little oil screen from the head was already missing. I did think about buying a NOS one but thought with the oil filter its probably not needed.

 

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