1950panhead

Twelve Dilapitated Lincolns 1925 to 1938

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Looks like they pocketed about 17 grand for the whole kit and kaboodle.

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Everything is too much money.........just saying..........

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College painter is going to have more wrapped up in transportation than he bid on the cars.

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OregonDesert - thanks for posting.  So many times we as pundits and interested lookie loos never know what the real sale, real value of these greedy for sale ads end up at.  Once the original seller wanted what? $125,000.  He could have sold these many months ago for reasonable offers, and some would have ended up with parties that would have used the rare parts, maybe combined a car or two for restoration.  The long and the short of it is, after buyers fees, this whole collection will be worth about $10,000 or so, or 10% of what the inflated asking price was. 

 

How many times do we hear "none of your business" what a car sold for.  Price guides will look at this real world sale as an outlier and make no adjustment to #5 or #6 cars, and we will go through this exercise all over again with the next "collection." 

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Could have gotten more money just kicking one car out at a time for sale. Flooded the Lincoln market with to many projects from one source. Seller drove down their own values.

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1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Could have gotten more money just kicking one car out at a time for sale. Flooded the Lincoln market with to many projects from one source. Seller drove down their own values.

I could have spent three hours there and re-assigned all the parts back to the cars, correctly identified them, and ... - that is how you get the job done. There is also a thing called marketing (all be it the auction company did do a nice job with photography).  And,  probably same year cars needed grouped together as hate to say it, though you need a parts car for the parts car (there are people that take on serious projects, but they get more few by the day and thus the chance of any one car here getting really done is slim). 

 

I recall the Karl Kleve auction and it was  shame that a dissembled L-29 Cord Convertible Sedan and a dissembled Minerva Convertible Sedan got mixed all into different lots and basically just became parts matched to V-16 Cadillac stuff all separated from the car it belonged too and ...., all be it the Duesenberg people did a nice job separating out stuff.  I get it though  as it was a near Herculean task of dis-assembled stuff.  

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I just cannot be taking on big projects at this point in my life. But it was really tempting. Two or three of the right cars together could have resulted in one or maybe even two restorable projects. That Judkins coupe, along with two of the '29/'30 sedans (at least the one with the headlamps!) could have almost made sense. The '25 probably needed to be sold separately, unless there were a lot of other earlier parts added to it, it couldn't have made sense as anything other than a parts car or chassis for someone with a loose body. The later cars would not have provided enough nearly correct pieces for it. Of course, if they could have had someone with a bit of knowledge put the loose parts with the cars that needed them? Could have made a couple more viable projects. But sold separately that way, maybe getting one of the cars one wanted, but not the other one needed to make a good project, made bidding on them individually even more risky.

 

Just so sad. Someone's unrealistic hopes and dreams mostly turned to scrap before all is said and done. It could still have meant something if the sale had been handled well.

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9 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

 

Just so sad. Someone's unrealistic hopes and dreams mostly turned to scrap before all is said and done. It could still have meant something if the sale had been handled well.

Restoring cars is hard work and often for everything that goes right two things go wrong - matched to you are taking on the work that literally it took 1000's of people whether factory or suppliers to do in the first place, matched to parts availability, space, time, and ...

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John M, Quite true. Restoration of such huge projects is not for those unwilling to work hard for a lot of hours, probably a few years, with no guarantee of success. Also, it is best if one has very deep pockets. But it can be done by someone with the passion, a little (preferably indoor ) space, tools and skills to do most of the work themselves. I have restored about a dozen cars over the years. About half of them were considered beyond restoration when I began them. I won't claim they were ready for the big shows when I was done. But most of them became decent and presentable cars that I was able to drive on tours with the clubs and enjoy for a few years. And most of them were nice enough that I could park them next to some of the finest cars on big car tours, and not be ashamed of my car. Many, but not all,  were model T Fords. I have also had a Reo, two fairly early Studebakers, a series 80 Pierce Arrow (the '15/'16 Studebaker and the Pierce were not restored by me), along with a couple others. I helped a friend rebuild the engine on his '25 Lincoln sedan, and drove that car quite a few times. Ten years ago, I could have been very interested in taking on a Lincoln or two if I could have gotten the right three of those for what they sold for.

But I cannot be taking on something like that now. I have a '27 Paige I still hope to get to, after I finish the '15 T I am currently working on.

 

There are still a few people around that could take on such a project. But how can they when the cars are marketed as badly as these were. I hope someone will restore that Judkins coupe. I have seen a couple of them on tours and at shows. Such a beautiful car.

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7 hours ago, wayne sheldon said:

John M, Quite true. Restoration of such huge projects is not for those unwilling to work hard for a lot of hours, probably a few years, with no guarantee of success. Also, it is best if one has very deep pockets. But it can be done by someone with the passion, a little (preferably indoor ) space, tools and skills to do most of the work themselves. I have restored about a dozen cars over the years. About half of them were considered beyond restoration when I began them. I won't claim they were ready for the big shows when I was done. But most of them became decent and presentable cars that I was able to drive on tours with the clubs and enjoy for a few years. And most of them were nice enough that I could park them next to some of the finest cars on big car tours, and not be ashamed of my car. Many, but not all,  were model T Fords. I have also had a Reo, two fairly early Studebakers, a series 80 Pierce Arrow (the '15/'16 Studebaker and the Pierce were not restored by me), along with a couple others. I helped a friend rebuild the engine on his '25 Lincoln sedan, and drove that car quite a few times. Ten years ago, I could have been very interested in taking on a Lincoln or two if I could have gotten the right three of those for what they sold for.

But I cannot be taking on something like that now. I have a '27 Paige I still hope to get to, after I finish the '15 T I am currently working on.

 

There are still a few people around that could take on such a project. But how can they when the cars are marketed as badly as these were. I hope someone will restore that Judkins coupe. I have seen a couple of them on tours and at shows. Such a beautiful car.

I am a close coupled sedan fan and hoped that "1929" Close Coupled Sedan would be taken on by someone.  When you tell your story I would say tackle anything you choose, but I know of a lot of stuff in garages that the people literally cannot work a crew driver and yet they have a dream of restoring it themselves - and been hearing that from them for 20 years now.  I tell the story of a local fellow who was always doing some project on his Pierce Arrow, Rolls-Royce, and ... - he was sort of a local legend and yet no one ever saw his cars - I had to help him with an environmental issue and saw them - not one as as nice as any car in this Lincoln auction other than they were complete and together - I will tell you he was 100% happy just owning his rare garbage (which by the way is fine).  For me, I have done 100 point cars, but prefer a nice original that does everything it is supposed to do mechanically.  

 

By the way:  A Paige is great.  friends in Bloomington, ILL had one and it was a great car.   I thought this Paige was really neat:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/25222/lot/350/?category=list&length=12&page=24 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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