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How buttercup got her groove back


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1 minute ago, NC-car-guy said:

Massive lifter tap... And it's running crappy, but it's running.

 

Lifters need to fill with oil. Start it and run up the RPM for a good while. When I replaced the rings, heads rebuilt and new lifters installed I started and ran the motor as if it was a camshaft break-in.  It clatters like hell for a bit but as the lifters each filled the quieter it got. 

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That would be a brass float with a groove to clip in at one end. Ford only recently discontinued them. Gm probably discontinued long ago, but they were used in Chevy trucks, so a Chevy truck vendor should have it if Bob's Automobilia doesn't. I was holding a bad one in my hand just yesterday that came from a 1960 Chevy 1/2 ton.

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1 hour ago, NC-car-guy said:

Took the heads off and put head gaskets on it while I had it out.  Remember......  13k motor that was running fine 12 years ago.  I didn't touch the bottom end. Oil was clean...

It sounds to me some lifters need to fill with oil to me. 

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So it's been driving me crazy and I had to come home at lunch and start her up. I let her warm up and then revved it and it is quieted way down there's still one tiny tick that hopefully will work out and an exhaust leak at the muffler.  

 

Also. As two previous owners ago had installed a rear speaker I need the rear speaker switch to be correct. I found one but not sure where to locate this.

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20191119_123313.jpg

Edited by NC-car-guy (see edit history)
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4 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

I’ve got a template I can scan and email you if not in a hurry. 

Great thanks.

2 minutes ago, MrEarl said:

It’s approximately as is in the first picture. The small and large series are different fitment, does that one fit the curvature at that point? 

Yes it does.

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On 11/18/2019 at 5:31 PM, NC-car-guy said:

Took the heads off and put head gaskets on it while I had it out.  Remember......  13k motor that was running fine 12 years ago.  I didn't touch the bottom end. Oil was clean...

 

Great thread and nice work getting her running........

 

I’ve some good luck over the years waking up engines that have not run in decades.

If you still have an irksome tick or tap..... drain that warm up oil, change filter (inspect the can and filter for

metallic stuff).  Refill with 4 qt.s of lighter weight oil and one quart of either Marvel Mystery oil

or an engine cleaning solvent like Rislone.   Get it up to operating temperature and vary the rpms up and down

for a good amount of time.   Shut it off let the oil drain back into pan, then do it again.

 

Then drain that concoction and refill with your favorite oil.   Some times a bit of solvent with lighter oil can free up

sticky lifters ;  even tho it was low mileage....... 12 years of sitting can cause those microscopic orifices in lifters

clog up a bit.

Im certainly no advocate of “repairs in a can” but this has worked for me on several long dead  project cars over the years.

One particularly irksome Studebaker V8 gave up the fight after I used 4 qts. of 10 weight mixed with........ready for this

one qt. of Liquid Wrench.   After getting it good and hot and winging it a few times.......settled right in .

 

my 2 cents...... Great work!,

 

 

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I let her warm up and then revved it and it is quieted way down there's still one tiny tick that hopefully will work out

 

 

It should work it's way out.  Mine will tick/tap when its a cold start at one cylinder even after the heads were done,, new lifters and new rings.  Once it warms it is silent. Strangest thing really.  The internals expand as each warms up.  Tick/tap gone.   Thing is...that tick/tap was there when I bought the Buick.  Still there after a minor rebuild.  Never caused any problems.  It does not implode or explode.  It just runs.  

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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My "solvent of choice is a quart of ATF  Had a car once that a certain lifter would start to tick.  Removed the filter, drained and reinstalled it, and added a quart of ATF.  I'd drive it for a few days till the ticking went away and do an oil change.  Just doing an oil change would not get rid of the ticking.  Something internally just needed a good cleaning.  When my dad was mechanicing, one of the guys with whom he worked would add a quart of kerosene to the crankcase before an oil change. Boy did that produce some dirty oil.  New oil and  filter and at the next oil change, the old oil was clean.

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Put the car on jack stands; go over the adjustment procedure in the service manual again and the trouble shooting portion; if no joy disconnect the linkage at the transmission and move it through the range as a test (don' go back to the Park position with the wheels turning.)

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5 minutes ago, old-tank said:

Put the car on jack stands; go over the adjustment procedure in the service manual again and the trouble shooting portion; if no joy disconnect the linkage at the transmission and move it through the range as a test (don' go back to the Park position with the wheels turning.)

I'll give it a go....   

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For the rear speaker switch, I used Lamar's template to get in the ball-park, but adjusted it slightly...  I measured and eye-ball confirmed to where it is even in height with the wiper control, and the same distance as is spaced between the headlight switch and wiper control.   Basically, balancing the three controls.  That worked visually for me, and is easy to see behind the wheel.  I had to grit my teeth while putting a drill to the dash, but more chrome and luxury is always good!!

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Well I pulled the water pump and unfortunately the leak is at the weep hole. I was really hoping I'd just messed up a gasket.  I'll send it to flow killer for a fancy impeller.  In the man time I'm going to flush the fuel tank again. 😳😜

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On 11/30/2019 at 3:43 PM, NC-car-guy said:

Stupid auto correct. Flow kooler.

 

Some people say Flowkooler is a gimmick, but the design is supposed to be high flow, minimal cavitation. If the school labs translate to cooling in a cylinder head, the best cooling is achieved when the flow is most turbulent, AKA going faster. You'll have to let us know how it performs, as I am wanting to do the same thing.

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Too bad we can't figure out a way to cool the nailhead like Chevy did with their 5.7 liter LT1.  Reverse flow has the water enter the heads first where the coolant is needed most.  It then flows through the block and back into the radiator.

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33 minutes ago, RivNut said:

Too bad we can't figure out a way to cool the nailhead like Chevy did with their 5.7 liter LT1.  Reverse flow has the water enter the heads first where the coolant is needed most.  It then flows through the block and back into the radiator.

 

Maybe there is a impeller that would fit or could be created for the original housing that move the water in opposite direction. 

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15 hours ago, Beemon said:

If the school labs translate to cooling in a cylinder head, the best cooling is achieved when the flow is most turbulent, AKA going faster. 

 

This does not compute. Water will need to slow so it can pick up the heat and carry it off as I understand it.  Is faster flow meaning moving more coolant than the standard impeller?  It appears I start outrun my water pump at speeds if 65-75 mph during very hot summer days.  I get a bit miffed when I see Pontiac of the same years that have a box from the grill to the radiator. The airflow has nowhere to go but through the radiator.  Our Buicks the airflow dances around and goes where it likes. 

Edited by avgwarhawk (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, avgwarhawk said:

 

This does not compute. Water will need to slow so it can pick up the heat and carry it off as I understand it.

 

Without getting too much into heat transfer stuff, there is some degree of dwell time but from every lab test I've conducted on campus with cross-flow heat exchangers, faster flow of coolant through the hot stuff always equals better heat transfer. Think of it like this. The coolant contacts the surface of the hot stuff only on the outside of the flow volume. The more turbulent the flow, the more it "mixes" the flow so it constantly takes the fluid in contact with the outside and swaps places with the inside colder stream, until it reaches a saturation temperature if given enough time to dwell.

Edited by Beemon (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Beemon said:

 

Without getting too much into heat transfer stuff, there is some degree of dwell time but from every lab test I've conducted on campus with cross-flow heat exchangers, faster flow of coolant through the hot stuff always equals better heat transfer. Think of it like this. The coolant contacts the surface of the hot stuff only on the outside of the flow volume. The more turbulent the flow, the more it "mixes" the flow so it constantly takes the fluid in contact with the outside and swaps places with the inside colder stream, until it reaches a saturation temperature if given enough time to dwell.

Check your PMs

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Think about how much 'cooler' you feel when it's 30° F outside and there's a 25 mph north wind compared to when it's 30° F outside and there's no wind.  

 

I don't know about the 50s era nailheads but on the 63 - 65 Rivieras with which I'm familiar, the A/C cars have an impeller with more blades than the non A/C cars, they have a 5 blade fan rather than a 4 blade fan, they have a shroud on the back of the radiator, and the radiator is sealed to the core support.  All to move the cooling factor (air in this case) faster in order to absorb more heat.

 

If you were to run a serpentine belt on the present setup, you would in essence reverse the flow of the coolant.  But that would also mean that you'd be pumping water into the bottom of the radiator. That ain't gonna work.  

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, RivNut said:

Think about how much 'cooler' you feel when it's 30° F outside and there's a 25 mph north wind compared to when it's 30° F outside and there's no wind.  

 

I don't know about the 50s era nailheads but on the 63 - 65 Rivieras with which I'm familiar, the A/C cars have an impeller with more blades than the non A/C cars, they have a 5 blade fan rather than a 4 blade fan, they have a shroud on the back of the radiator, and the radiator is sealed to the core support.  All to move the cooling factor (air in this case) faster in order to absorb more heat.

 

If you were to run a serpentine belt on the present setup, you would in essence reverse the flow of the coolant.  But that would also mean that you'd be pumping water into the bottom of the radiator. That ain't gonna work.  

 

 

Metal does not experience the sensation of hot and cold as we humans do.    Reverse the hoses to the radiator!  Just a bit of replumbing.

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3 hours ago, avgwarhawk said:

 

 

Metal does not experience the sensation of hot and cold as we humans do.    Reverse the hoses to the radiator!  Just a bit of replumbing.

I know that, I was just trying to make a point.  Metal doesn't have sweat to be evaporated to cause "wind chill."  Water on the pond in 34 degree weather will not freeze even if the wind chill is -30 degrees F. 😎

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