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Help with Clum light switch

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Need to find a material of about 1/16” thickness to fabricate two non-metallic layerers for my Clum switch. I used the red fiber material sold by Restoration Supply. It worked fine for 2 years but has failed. It has warped and switch shorts out. It is not durable enough. The attached photo is of my original switch.

Need a suggestion for a supplier. MacMaster may have a material.

Whats the chance to find a new switch? I would thinks pretty small.

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I buy plastic sheets in 4' X8' for the race car, albeit not quite that thin.

I have scraps if you want a piece. Its black.

PM me your address and I will drop a piece in the mail.

Another idea might be UHMW if it cones that thin.

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McMaster-Carr........... Search... Garolite. They have it in electrical insulating sheets any size or temp range you might need all at a quite reasonable price. Your use is what it was designed for. McMaster-Carr. Source of all things with next day delivery.................Bob

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You may purchase sheets of reinforced rubber in varying thickness.  I found some on eBay.  However, I suspect it would have some flex to it that would not be desirable in this application.

 

Can not one fab the needed plate out of plywood?

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There's a spring inside pressing a dimpled copper plate that rotates against the flush contact buttons on the inside of that insulated board. The insulating board warps with spring tension over the years. Then the dimples can no longer reach the contacts because the outer edges of the copper plate are all that contacts the warped insulating board.

 

A late friend who was a machinist used to rebuild them for me using ridged plastic sheet material from MSC machine shop supply. After he passed I've taken some apart and was able to very slowly and carefully bend them back so they worked,.. but for how long ?

 

It needs an insulator that will resist bending with the spring tension.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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5 minutes ago, PFitz said:

It needs an insulator that will resist bending with the spring tension.

 

Garolite is an epoxy impregnated fiberglass reinforced dielectric sheet material. moisture resistant and dimensionally stable.........Bob

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What about a phenolic circuit board? The type hobbyists start with for building electronic projects. It's usually copper clad on one or both sides. You could etch the copper off except maybe around the rivets and have a durable non-conductive surface.

Edited by rsb (see edit history)
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Consider Delrin sheets, also available from McMaster Carr. Its hard, a good insulator, and machines 

& drills well. rsb suggestion of using a phenolic or glassy-epoxy circuit board is also possible. Use an etch to remove (dissolve) copper where you don't want it. PM me for details and what materials to do this. Can be done by the DIYer.

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Whatever material is used, it has to be thin enough to be held by the four short metal tabs of the switch housing that get bent back over to hold it in place (after annealing them).  It has to not warp with the constant pressure of the rather large coil spring inside the switch. And it has to do that while withstanding engine bay heat. 

 

I'll see if I can determine what my late machinist friend figured out to use, that has lasted for over 20 years on my customer's cars.

 

Paul  

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Garolite is a trade name for the material circuit boards are made from. G-9 Garolite is the stiffest.

 

1 hour ago, PFitz said:

Whatever material is used, it has to be thin enough to be held by the four short metal tabs of the switch housing that get bent back over to hold it in place

Use a material 1/8" thick and mill slots 1/16" deep for the tabs to fold into. Problem solved..................Bob

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