thebum

Information about Stutz Bearcat

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Hello, I am hoping that someone will be able to give me more info about this car which I believe is a Stutz Bearcat. The photo, according to the Date written on the back of the photo, was taken on 15 May, 1919, I presume in Atlantic City, New Jersey. My Grandmother is sitting on the front of the hood. I do have the name of who I believe was the owner, who was from Philadelphia, PA and Atlantic City, New Jersey, if that would be helpful. I would like to add this info to my Tree on Ancestry.com . Thank You 

fampics924.jpg

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Looks to have full elliptical front springs which means it is not a Stutz.

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Definitely not a Stutz although clearly styled with a strong resemblance. It is also a smaller car than a Stutz.  Those front springs should help narrow down what it actually is.

 

Greg in Canada

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It's interesting that it still has gas lights (and a Prestolite tank) in 1919. We tend to think that after electric lights were available most cars were converted to them. The car itself is probably 1912-1913.

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GREAT photo. Thanks for sharing. 

 

Say, what is that indistinct blob on the right side ("driver's side, in this photo)) of the cowl area, right where a cowl light might be located. I don't recognize that. 

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I see a speedometer, horn and side light on or near the cowl   also the presto-lite tank is mounted upside down, seen in modern photos more often.

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Hello thebum, I believe the automobile is a 1912 Hupmobile  model 20 runabout. The steering wheel is probably wrapped because they were wood dovetailed together and always seemed to separate. The blob is the horn, the horn bulb is located in front of the shift levers outside the drivers side false door. However, it should be mounted on the dashboard by the hood, where it always got wacked (probably why the car owner moved it). I also do not see any kerosene cowl lights ( unless the thing that looks like an upside down bag is a light), which should be mounted at the top outside edge of the dashboard. The sidelight brackets are not correct nor in the right location. The speedometer head would be mounted on the inside of the dashboard, inside the vehicle. The Prestolite tank is correct as are the headlights. The radiator neck if it were visible would be very tall. A very fun car to drive, only downside for some folks is the two speed transmission. Thanks for posting, and as always stand to be corrected. Diane

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A tall radiator neck would make grandma's perch a little uncomfortable.

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2 hours ago, scotchyoke said:

Hello thebum, I believe the automobile is a 1912 Hupmobile  model 20 runabout. The steering wheel is probably wrapped because they were wood dovetailed together and always seemed to separate. The blob is the horn, the horn bulb is located in front of the shift levers outside the drivers side false door. However, it should be mounted on the dashboard by the hood, where it always got wacked (probably why the car owner moved it). I also do not see any kerosene cowl lights ( unless the thing that looks like an upside down bag is a light), which should be mounted at the top outside edge of the dashboard. The sidelight brackets are not correct nor in the right location. The speedometer head would be mounted on the inside of the dashboard, inside the vehicle. The Prestolite tank is correct as are the headlights. The radiator neck if it were visible would be very tall. A very fun car to drive, only downside for some folks is the two speed transmission. Thanks for posting, and as always stand to be corrected. Diane

Not a Hupmobile. Look closer at the front springs. They are full-elliptical like a buggy with no frame horns. The radiator is a totally different shape, too.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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If I were you I would place this post in the  What is It sub-forum just below.  It will stay on top a lot longer.  

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Thanks for all of the replies, Hupmobile and Cameron are cars that I have never heard of before. I copied the photo of the 1910 Cameron "Six Flyer" and compared the photos. The front springs look the same to me but the photo of the Cameron has what looks like a tool box on the driver side running board and the photo that I posted has a tank of some sort on the running board. I did post this photo on the "What Is It" Forum. Thank You, the Bum

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Not a Cameron. The radiator is different. Different cowl shape, too.

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Bolt on accessories like tool boxes and acetylene  tanks are not good details to use for identification.  Even if shown in a catalog photo many time the actual production cars will vary in detail. And many times accessories like this were either added by the selling dealer or added later by the cars owner. Even body styles are at times an unreliable means of identification. Restyling a few years old car was reasonably common in this era, likewise installing a stripped down sports body. Some factory sports body cars like the mystery car were made, however there were also many one off versions produced by individual owners or independent shops.

 Chassis details are a much more reliable means of identification on early era cars.

 

Greg in Canada

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There are some definite similarities to this Cameron.  And remember.... the Cameron was air cooled, so there WAS no radiator, and therefore no protruding radiator cap to inconvenience grandma's perch.  ;)

Screen Shot 2018-11-13 at 10.24.59 PM.png

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