Paul Schjetne

1916 Continental 303 engine help

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Hello, i am doing a service on a 1916 Continental engine for a customer. This is a 303cid inline 6.  I got the engine dismantled and now we are trying to figure out oil routing in front of engine. I have heard that there is a regulator/restrictor for reducing oil to front camshaft bearing and intermediate shaft bearing. Anyone have schematics or experience with this engine? In picture i have pointed oil supply line coming into front of engine and small oil reservoir feeding Camshaft and IMS. 

 

Paul 

1916 Continental.jpg

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Cont'l  made numerous engines over the years, and you might get better replies posting the engine ID; there should be a tag on it, often half hidden behind accessories...

Cont'l was also very good at public relations, getting technical articles on new engines in the trade journals; Googling the engine ID and year may turn some up on yours, often helpful with unfamiliar engines....

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Since he's not posted any additional info since October I assume he's solved his problem...

A 1917 ring catalog lists twenty  Cont;l 6s in 5 different bores, and that's probably not a complete list......

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One possibility is the Continental 9N, with 3 and a half inch bore and a little over 5 inch stroke.  They were non-detacheable head side valve,  with threaded plugs above the valves.   There was low flow, low pressure pump to oil the 3 main bearing crankshaft, with crankpin and mains of generous size.  There were oil troughs for the dippers on the con-rods.   You will recall that the ohv Chev 6 cylinder engines had splash oiled big ends pretty much into the early 1960s; and Hudson adhered to splash feed for their engines a good many years post-War.  For several years post 1970,   I had a 15cwt short wheelbase Chev blitz with a fertilizer spreader, which was good for smaller spreading jobs fairly close to the rail siding.  Load capacity was 3 ton of superphosphate, or 3 1/2 ton of "2-and-1 super/potash.  Heavy loaded it was slow to the job, but would wind up the 50mph coming home empty to re-load.  I never had engine trouble, even though the friendship was probably over-stretched.   My 9N Continentals are Roamer, but the same were an option in a number of quality autos, including as the surviving option to the Miller engines in the Leach passenger car.  Reading Mark Dees book "The Miller Dynasty", it seems the Miller had fatal shortcomings, and an engine probably lasted about as long as it took to build before it was replaced by a 9N Continental.  I have most essentials of an early Roamer, and though the original slightly smaller 6 cyl detacheable head Rutenber, I can tell what it originally was by the engine mountings. I regard the 9N Continental as very high quality compared to that particular model "Rottenber" which had die-cast crankshaft bearing inserts of babbit,  which I regard as possibly only useful for a farm stationary engine.

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Ihave a 1917 continental serial 7n22022 could any and all ifo. Thanks  What is the name for that engine? 

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If its a 6 it's almost certainly a 7N, which doesn't show in a 1917 ring catalog but does in later catalogs...

It seems to share piston assemblies with a dozen other Cont'ls, valves with a few and bearings with a few more per a 36 engine parts catalog, if you're looking for engine parts...(can advise if needed

A1930 gasket catalog which usually lists makes using Cont'ls omits that info for the 7 N and severa lsister engines...

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CORRECTION??---that 7N 31/2 bore may've been issued BOTH  as a 4 and a 6---

Out of curiosity eyeballed a 25 catalog, which listed the 7N 6cyl in a raft of cars, but listed the 7N as a four in MOST of the truck makes, with three trucks listing it as a 6...(not a complete list)

While I haven't reviewed a 1924 catalog, its Cont'l engines list lists the 7N as both a four and six, which seems to verify the 1925 catalog listings...needs more work

At any rate, it seems to've been quite popular in both 4 and 6, if there really were 4s aand 6s...

and also should've advised starting a new thread (new inquiry on this engine)---here you're tacked onto an old thread that very few will see.

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