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1915 Packard Twin Six Series 1-25 Model 118 Seven Passenger Touring! Exceptional Automobile!

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1915 Packard Twin Six Series 1-25 Model 118 Seven Passenger Touring. Spectacular Automobile! This is one of the oldest surviving Packard Twin Six known to exist. One of the most important Packards in existence. The Twin Six was introduced in May of 1915. After driving a new Twin Six from New York to San Francisco Packard President Henry Joy called the new Packard “The greatest piece of machinery that ever went over the highways”. The new Twin Six won the only Grand Prize Medal awarded at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. The Twin Six was designed by Packard Engineer Jesse Vincent. It was Packard’s response to Cadillac’s V-8 which had been released earlier in the year. This Packard has great provenance. Known Ownership History. Records and documentation accompany this fine Packard dating back to 1969. Formerly owned by Bradley Skinner who was considered to be the foremost expert on the Twin Six Packard. The Packard Club presents an award each year named for Mr. Skinner. It has received a recent mechanical freshening and has been successfully toured over the last several years. We completed an 80-mile day trip with ease. Finished in Black and Dark Blue. The interior is finished in Black Button Tufted Leather that is as comfortable as a living room sofa. 125 inch wheelbase. Powered by Packard’s 424 Cubic Inch Twin Six (12-cylinder) which was rated at 88 horsepower. Tremendous amounts or torque. Three Speed Transmission. This Packard travels comfortably at modern highway speeds. Electric Starter and lighting. A “Stop” lamp has been added for safety. Features include dual rear mounted spare tires. Rear jump seats. Dual outside mirrors. Running board mounted tool box. Cocoa Step Plates. Waltham 8-day clock. Front Bumper. Arro-Meter. Air Compressor for tire service. This outstanding Packard is Horseless Carriage Club of America (HCCA) Tour eligible. This Packard is a Classic Car Club of America (CCCA) “Full Classic”. This Packard is eligible for Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Tours, Shows and other Club events. This Packard is most certainly eligible for Packard Club Tours, Shows and events. This Packard would also be welcomed at countless other Concours d’Elegance type car shows. This Packard will certainly draw a crowd where ever it is displayed. Excellent road manners. Ready to Drive, Show and Enjoy. $ Serious Offers Considered Call Pete or Andy 419-668-1884

 

Located in Norwalk Ohio, 44857 "Home of the Fisher Brothers"

 

Watch this great Packard in action: 

 

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Edited by Brass is Best (see edit history)
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Thank you for the tour. I only wish I was qualified ! It is stunning.

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7 hours ago, 23hack said:

Thank you for the tour. I only wish I was qualified ! It is stunning.

 

Thank you sir.

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Was this car at Hershey last fall?  I recal a puddle of drool of my creation (others might have helped). A dear friend has a 1920 twin six seven passenger that has been my dream car since I was little bigger than a toddler. HCCA eligibility makes this one so much better. 

 

My Birthday is 7 days away: I am barely tech savvy enough to use the forums but want a gofundme page. 

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11 hours ago, gossp said:

Was this car at Hershey last fall?  I recal a puddle of drool of my creation (others might have helped). A dear friend has a 1920 twin six seven passenger that has been my dream car since I was little bigger than a toddler. HCCA eligibility makes this one so much better. 

 

My Birthday is 7 days away: I am barely tech savvy enough to use the forums but want a gofundme page. 

 

Those puddles tend to show up every place this car goes. Buy a lottery ticket for your birthday, you never know...

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I believe Phil Hill had one of these he inherited and after a few close calls added front  brakes!  I would think that might be a good idea coming from  a World Champion formula 1 driver !  

It certainly is a beautiful car. I have an amazing letter from Hendee the head of the Indian motorcycle Company addressed to Packard extolling the virtues of and satisfaction with his new 1915 twin six Packard ! 

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43 minutes ago, Barry Brown said:

I believe Phil Hill had one of these he inherited and after a few close calls added front  brakes!  I would think that might be a good idea coming from  a World Champion formula 1 driver !  

It certainly is a beautiful car. I have an amazing letter from Hendee the head of the Indian motorcycle Company addressed to Packard extolling the virtues of and satisfaction with his new 1915 twin six Packard ! 

 

I think everyone who has ever driven a Twin Six has been impressed. From 1915 through today. They are truly wonderful machines. She stops fast and straight. A lot can be said for having good properly adjusted brakes. Paying attention to the road, not tailgating, and avoiding rush hour traffic on the 405 never hurts either.

Edited by Brass is Best (see edit history)
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Being a Pierce Arrow guy through and through, I must admit these are great cars............and it sure would be interesting to take a Pierce 66 and run it next to the twin six..............interesting comparison. Either car would be fantastic to own.

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Great cars to drive as long as you are used to the limitations of two wheel brakes, especially on wet roads since there is so much weight upfront. Always wondered what it must have been like to be the proud chauffeur of a first model year 1916 twin when they came out. The torque and smoothness is extremely impressive with starts in 2nd no problem and a rolling start in 3rd no strain. To fully appreciate these cars it is necessary to compare them to similar cars of the period. The Twins were ahead of the competition. Interesting that these cars were considered dogs by many collectors in the early days of the hobby and were largely ignored, but now they are appreciated for the advanced cars that they were when introduced.

 

As far as a comparison to a Pierce 66, I can't say since I have only ridden in a 66 and never driven one. The torque and the smoothness of the twin was superior to most if not all of its contemporaries. As Ed well knows, there is an inherent smoothness to a V12.

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I have never driven a very early twin six, I think the first ones didn’t have detachable heads.......I remember back in the early seventies when many of these were regularly driven to meets on surface roads. It was fun to see the “real Packard guys” dump on the twelves, saying the model 30 was the last good car they built!......amazing how times and thoughts evolve. Packard never built anything but above average cars.......yup, coming from a Pierce guy! Even the smaller sixes of the thirties that don’t get much following are fun cars and great drivers. Operating a early car like this is such a rewarding experience, sadly today even enthusiastic collectors are afraid of big machines. This era car are fantastic family vehicles, providing endless hours of joy and entertainment, sadly too many people are afraid to own and operate them as intended. These were meant to be used and enjoyed, not left parked in a museum or garage. As time goes by my view on collecting has slowly evolved, and now I find the most enjoyment of bringing long dormant cars back to life.......running an engine that hasn’t started in 40, 50, or 60 years is a thrill. It use to be the thrill of the chase, the joy of ownership, now for me it’s making a stationary display car mobile again. This weekend I will be driving a 89 year old car, that to the best of my knowledge has always been registered and running.......an amazing feat that the first two owners held on to the car for almost 75 years between them. Monday I’ll be getting our car ready for the AACA Ocala Florida show.......my first time having a car entered or judged in the AACA.......and I have been attending Hershey since the very early seventies! Not sure if there will be any opportunities to drive a few miles, and maybe find a few other people who would like to take the cars out for a run........look for a big black 1933 sedan, going down the road or on the field. Ed

 

PS- Love those early condensers on the twin six.......a car done very well with no excuses as far as authenticity or attention to detail. It’s the little things like that that tell me the car is one of the best......

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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My only exposure to a Twin Six was watching an engine being rebuilt at White Post Restorations.  It's the kind of rebuild you don't trust to very many people, and there was (is) a very talented mechanic there who worked on it.  What a piece of machinery!  When most of America was puttering around on four cylinders.....

 

Ed, I know you like getting cars alive again....I'd sure like to have that Pierce convertible coupe that just popped up, after a long dormant storage, that would be fun!

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David, your comment about rebuilding a twin six engine reminds me of my father's tale about removing the blocks on twins. He had owned various twins and had used a 2nd and 3rd series for daily transportation and ended up with a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd series in his collection of Packards. He said that a Packard "old timer" told him that a common way to remove the blocks on a twin was to raise one side of the car high enough so that there would be a straight upward lift for the chain hoist. The car would be lowered and the exercise would be repeated for the other side. Hard to imagine that Packard engineer Col.Jesse Vincent would have approved of this procedure. Ed is correct in that the 1st series was non-detachable heads with ports whereas the 2nd and 3rd series had detachable heads. 

 

Ed, hope to see you again at Ocala.

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