grandpa's car

need help identifying grandpa's car

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hi, recently found this picture of my grandpa's car in taken in 1921.  I want to figure out what "exact" make and model this car is in the picture below.  Wondering if anyone can direct me to someone who would know from the details in the picture?

  It is my grandfather driving in 1921 with my dad in the back seat.  We/they were poor so I would guess its an old car by the time the picture was taken.

The details I have noticed that seem unique are:

a)  the 7 lugs on the tires,

b)  the sharp corner at the base of the windscreen,

c)  the ‘inserted’ louver panel in the engine cowling (not stamped in the actual panel),

d)  the in-between doors ‘centered’ attachment screw, and,

e)  the access panel under the rear door.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

  Steve

90907385_1921_EdwardHawkinsc1921.thumb.jpg.f3b57c08f3fa03e73bd96d442d02f6be.jpg

 

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They may not have been as poor as you think, because that is a fairly late model, large car in 1921, definitely 1915 or newer because the steering wheel is on the left, and by the length of the hood, it must be at least six cylinders in-line, not a four. This is no cheap, low-priced car! Still has a good top, some of its side curtains, and pretty good paint, so this was not a very old car in 1921. The grease door or fuel shut-off door in the running board apron near the rear fender throws me and makes me think it is not a Buick. Anybody else???? Some of you Pre-War guys need to chime in on this.

Pete Phillips

Edited by Pete Phillips (see edit history)
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Its not a Buick.   I think Leif is right about a Studebaker.  Here,s a 1916

52a0aca9c6b57.image.jpg

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Thank you all for the comments.  Very much appreciated.

Buick was my best guess as a starting place, as i have little knowledge of this era of cars.

thanks for putting up with me on that.

the Studebaker's do indeed look promising now that i have some direction.

the hood length i had not considered but see the good eye/diagnosis there. 

a)  the 7 lugs on the tires, (_____ i have found a few, but still some, stude' pictures with 7)

b)  the sharp corner at the base of the windscreen, (_____ also seems to fit with 15 - 17 stude's)

c)  the ‘inserted’ louver panel in the engine cowling - not stamped in the actual panel (_____ i have NOT seem this detail yet)

d)  the in-between doors ‘centered’ attachment screw (_____ spot-on with the stude design)

e)  the access panel under the rear door. (_____yep, that is on stude's also)

i am tripped up a bit on the rocker panel.  the 1921 picture looks like a 'flat' panel, and all the stude's are well rounded.  wondering if that is just the 1921 angle and picture quality or too much of an outlier to confirm studebaker possibilities.

I am also guessing that i should probably re-post in the stude' forum/area and see if anyone can drill it down some more.

this has been wonderful, and i thank you all for helping.

I will continue looking.

Steve

 

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I don't think those louvres in the bonnet or hood are inserted at all. They look pressed to me. There is no shape around them. There is a change in light reflection above them where the panel curves away though.

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Hello again,

Yes indeed, i think the picture has fooled me about the louver insert.  I have found no others with that trate.

just to properly conclude, the Stude' forum has assisted a bit and nailed it down some more.

they believe the car is a:

1917 Studebaker Series 18, model ED, six cylinder.

Thanks again and again for starting the clues from Buick onward to Stude' - Pete, thanks for egging it onward to success.

Now to find one to recover ... eeeek.

thank you all,

steve

Edited by grandpa's car (see edit history)

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