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  • 4 weeks later...
12 hours ago, alsancle said:

A Special Cunningham V-8 of 1918.


 

This car or one just like it recently was sold after the owner of almost 70 years died. It hadn’t been running since the late 50’s. Where did it go? To one of the “black hole” collections, where I expect it will never be seen for another 50 years. Too bad, as I had my eye on it for the last 25.

 

 

 

 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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5 hours ago, edinmass said:

This car or one just like it recently was sold after the owner of almost 70 years died. It hadn’t been running since the late 50’s. Where did it go? To one of the “black hole” collections, where I expect it will never be seen for another 50 years. Too bad, as I had my eye on it for the last 25.

 

Why would you not mention this to one of your good friends that can occasionally actually dig their wallet out of their pocket with a fishing line?   You know you need a deep sea diving suit to find yours.

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  • 3 weeks later...

cunningham-34.jpg

 

This 1922 Cunningham was built for Air Force Major M. K. Lee on a 142 inch wheelbase chassis. This car had shatter-proof glass, a 50-gallon gas tank, an oil supply good for 5,000 miles, a Kellogg one-shot lubricator (pressing the foot pedal lubricated all chassis points) and triple windshield wipers. The dashboard contained a combination of 42 instruments, switches, and miscellaneous gadgets including many normally found only in aircraft cockpits. Among them were a tachometer, radio switch, fuel gauge, altimeter, voltmeter, ammeter, oil gauge, light switch, ignition switch, an imported French speedometer engraved with Major Lee's name, two motometers, aviator's compass, air speed indicator, etc. There were 8 lights beamed forward, 2 headlights, 2 "ditch" lights, 2 inside adjustable spotlights, and 2 sidelights. There were also parking, dome, dash and running board lights.

In this picture, it has a 1925 Washington, DC license plate but is sitting in front of the Cunningham factory on Canal St.

From: The Pursuit of Excellence by Noel Hinrichs (1964)

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This 1917 Cunningham "Bobtail" Speedster is supposedly the one that set the 24 hour record for stock cars at Brighton Beach Track and driven by the famous Ralph DePalma. 
The photo was taken at the Briggs Cunningham Museum in Costa Mesa, CA. That museum closed in 1987.postcards-2013-12-02-0002.jpg

 

his 1922 Cunningham DePalma Speedster was inspired by the race car above. This had a V-8 engine with 445 cu. in of displacement.

From: The Pursuit of Excellence by Noel Hinrichs (1964)

cunningham-32.jpg

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The 1922 New York Show Car (speedster) is still around and undergoing restoration. It’s a very nice car, with some unusual details. It’s well hidden, and been out of the public eye since the 50’s. I had a chance to look it over last year at my shop. 

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21 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

This 1921 Cunningham Roadster is a model V-4 but it was powered by a V-8.

 

They weren't doing themselves any favors with their model designations.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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  • 1 month later...

I posted this back on Page 1 but didn't get any response.   I need someone smarter than me to explain the overdrive 4th gear and if they have ever seen that on an  American built car before.   Every 4 speed from the era I have ever seen had a stump puller in 1st and direct in 4th.

 

Eddie?  Walt?  Tim? Jim?  John?  Anybody?  comments?

 

https://content.invisioncic.com/r277599/monthly_2019_10/image.png.9691d567b6e54a533e48f994d52d7aee.png

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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4 hours ago, alsancle said:

I posted this back on Page 1 but didn't get any response.   I need someone smarter than me to explain the overdrive 4th gear and if they have ever seen that on an  American built car before.   Every 4 speed from the era I have ever seen had a stump puller in 1st and direct in 4th.

 

Eddie?  Walt?  Tim? Jim?  John?  Anybody?  comments?

 

https://content.invisioncic.com/r277599/monthly_2019_10/image.png.9691d567b6e54a533e48f994d52d7aee.png

No clue abouth 4th, but big question probably is what is the rear axle ratio - probably a 5.? something to 1 negating any decent transmission ratios. 

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1 hour ago, John_Mereness said:

No clue abouth 4th, but big question probably is what is the rear axle ratio - probably a 5.? something to 1 negating any decent transmission ratios. 

 

I'm sure it is 5-1 or worse,  although if I'm using my math degree correctly,  that would make 4th gear 4.2-1 which is practically a speed gear for 1928.

 

We need some comments from someone that owns one of these cars. 

 

 

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But the interesting thing to me is that an American manufacturer built a transmission where direct was not the top gear.    If I understand the engineering,  direct drive was supposed to be the one that got used the most.

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Here is a clipping from LA Evening Express of March 1929.  I wonder if this car is the white one that still exists?  That talk about 125HP and 100MPH  which I guess standard for any expensive car to claim and few could do.

 

 

Evening_Express_Wed__Mar_27__1929_.jpg

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From coachbuilt.com: http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/c/cunningham/cunningham.htm

 

The 1926 Cunningham Series V-6 heralded the debut of a 90 degree V-8 with aluminum heads, a counterbalanced crankshaft and Bendix starter drive. Delco now supplied all of the vehicle’s electrics (lighting and ignition) and the firm commenced using 4-wheel mechanical brakes, Houdaille shock absorbers and a new Cunningham-built 3-speed +overdrive transmission.

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More from coachbuilt:

The Series 1930-1931 V-9 Cunningham remained unchanged from previous series, but the Series V-10 which debuted in late 1931 included a number of evolutionary changes.  Most noticeable was its enlarged 471 cu. in. powerplant, less noticeable changes included a free-wheeling synchromesh transmission and a changeover to semi-elliptic rear springs.

 

Does anyone know if any V9 Cunningham's actually exist?

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