RansomEli

Woodgraining kits - any feedback?

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Grain-it Technologies is having a sale during October. 10% discount because they are not going to Hershey. I've been intrigued with their videos. From my research they seem to be the best of the bunch.

 

Does anyone have experience woodgraining their dashboard and window frames? Looks like I could save some money doing it myself and still produce quality results.

 

http://woodgraining.com

 

Thanks in advance for any responses. 

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I bought their big kit with expectations to do a bunch of work.  It's time consuming and I had problem with something in my prep work (baking soda in my cabinet contaminated my surface though I was only blasting with sand, so I got blistering eventually develop in the finish so I was leery of doing anymore until I figured the problem out,  but that has nothing to do with the kit)   I would strongly recommend the kit though as I was very pleased with the finished product, as was everyone I showed it to.   If you use a mahogany tone color for the base,  use a red oxide primer,  it will require alot less base coat and come out with a more uniform finish.  I would also suggest using a regular clear in a gun with a hardener as the Upol takes a long time to harden and never hardens like a finish with a catalyst in it. 

If I get that far,  I might wood grain the moldings and dash in My Hudson Big Boy. 

Wonder why they aren't going to Hershey.  Always seemed to be a few people around their trailer when I passed by it. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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I really liked their kit. Just one word - PRACTICE-

Rolling the grain is definitely a learned art, but after a few tries I got the hang of it. Everything else is basic prep and paint.

 

Good luck.

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I found some photos of mine.  This is tigered maple done in mahogany. The dash was a bit of a pain because the roll is so round at the top that it took I think 3 rolls to do it around and 3 rolls or 4 wide.  The good thing is if you screw up,  you can just wipe it off and start over.  It takes a long time for the ink and stain to dry as well.  I stuck it in a closed up car for a couple of days out in the sun and it finally dried.  

Using the Upol spray clear you will need to wet sand and buff everything to get this smooth of a finish.  Also don't spray the Upol clear in the sun as it dries fast enough it's hard to keep a wet line and not trap air bubbles in the finish. 

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Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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I didn't bother with a kit, I started with the lighter color: painted the entire area with the light color and once dry, used cheese cloth to apply the grains using printer's ink (called paste ink) which is in a thick paste form. Apply clear over the entire area/part once the ink has dried (allow for entire day).  And as midman said: Practice. Play around with the cheesecloth, you can make burls using a twist technique. Its actually fun once you get the hang of it.

Edited by Friartuck (see edit history)

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I've also experimented using basecoat paint that had not been reduced and had good results.

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I'll tell you what.

type in code= RansomEli

That is case sensitive and get 15% off all tools this month.

Someone here forgot to renew our spaces, he called 5 or 6 weeks ago but

they were taken our mistake.

Thanks, Jdee

 

 

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Thanks, Jdee. I'll take you up on the discount. 

 

I'm woodgraining a 1929 Franklin and need to do some research. There are two types of wood graining in the car. I need to check the Franklin club for the exact patterns.

 

 

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One thing I have noticed about all the home brew techniques I have seen used on old cars ,  some look like a pretty good amateur attempt,  but look nothing like the woodgraining the cars should have.  My 40 Ford (which shouldn't even be woodgrained) is one of them.  When you glance inside, you say that doesn't look too bad,  until you actually look at it, then realize it's not even close to what the woodgraining should look like.  Many attempts come in far worse. 

Buy the kit and do it right. Smearing paint on wit ha rag or cheese cloth unless you are one talented artist is going to look like you wiped the dash with a dirty rag then clear coated it.  Don't waste your time on the home brew attempts unless you are happy with the type of quality earl Scheib specials provided.  Buy the kit.  

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We did a 1929 Franklin but there is not much info in the folder. I'll ask Evan if he has more info somewhere.

 

Thanks Jdee. 

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