Sign in to follow this  
Graham Man

My 18 year old sent me this...funny

Recommended Posts

I have to agree with that, 100%!

 

The particular example of post 1990 automotive engineering shown above, while ill-disposed toward convenient maintenance, is not a particularly valid one since all one has to do to access the oil filter, is just remove the engine.  Piece o' cake!  After all, it only took them a few minutes to install the engine/transaxle (whatever) on the production line.

 

Cheers,

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

S'why I don't want to work on new cars.  As they got smaller and more crowed, I got bigger. :rolleyes:

 

Paul

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't there a Cadillac model that has the starter motor under the valley pan? You basically have to remove the entire top of the motor to replace the starter. Cap, right you are. I have heard horror stories about having to lift the motor to get at a spark plug. It's impossible to do an oil change on my modern car without spilling oil on my driveway. First you need to be a contortionist to just get at the filter and second it's mounted SIDEWAYS, so when you unscrew it, out comes the oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How true!

If the engineers who designed them ever had to work on them they never would have made the Ford Aerostar (among others).

They were a particular bane to most repair shops in the 80's with a book time of close to 4 hours to r&r the spark plugs. Ugh!

?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like some of you are buying the wrong brand of modern cars for doing your own oil changes.

 

I just lift up the hood and undo the oil filter on top of the engine on both my modern cars.  One has the oil filter just behind the radiator and the other just behind the valve cover, but both are at the top of the engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Isn't there a Cadillac model that has the starter motor under the valley pan? You basically have to remove the entire top of the motor to replace the starter. Cap, right you are. I have heard horror stories about having to lift the motor to get at a spark plug. It's impossible to do an oil change on my modern car without spilling oil on my driveway. First you need to be a contortionist to just get at the filter and second it's mounted SIDEWAYS, so when you unscrew it, out comes the oil.

Many engines now have the starter in the valley, under the intake. The environment there is much more benign so the starter lasts longer. In the case of the Northstar, the top of the intake comes off with four bolts. The gasket is a reusable o-ring. Starter replacement (WITHOUT jacking up the car) takes no more time than for an older car. Maybe we engineers aren't so stupid after all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you done a Lexas or Tundra starter! 

Under the intake and not a simple job unless you are a dealer hot shot tech.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1960s engine and oil be like  "you gotta change it every 3000 miles"  2018 engines and oil be like "you might have to change it every 7000 miles and the engine will let you know when"

 

I should mention that my 29 Studebaker's manual said you need to change the first time at 500 miles and every 1000 miles after that unless you are using the choke a lot then back to 500 miles. Also most did not come from the factory with an oil filter. 

 

Edited by keninman
added a paragraph (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, c49er said:

Have you done a Lexas or Tundra starter! 

Under the intake and not a simple job unless you are a dealer hot shot tech.

The Cadillac that 46 woodie referred to also has the starter under the intake. Go read my post again. You do not have to remove "the whole top of the motor" to replace that starter. I've never touched a Lexus or Tundra, nor do I plan to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

Many engines now have the starter in the valley, under the intake. The environment there is much more benign so the starter lasts longer. In the case of the Northstar, the top of the intake comes off with four bolts.

 

Most Northstar engines were toast before they needed a starter

4 hours ago, keninman said:

1960s engine and oil be like  "you gotta change it every 3000 miles"  2018 engines and oil be like "you might have to change it every 7000 miles and the engine will let you know when"

 

 In all honesty the engine oil today is much better then it was in the 60's, and with fuel injection the engine never runs rich eliminating gasoline contamination

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TerryB said:

Go electric, no filter or oil!

 

Actually, for the casual city commuter, that's a good idea.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago Road & Track magazine published a race track photo, taken in the 20s. It showed a row of outhouses and above them a billboard that said "Drain Your Crankcase Every 1000 Miles".

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

The Cadillac that 46 woodie referred to also has the starter under the intake. Go read my post again. You do not have to remove "the whole top of the motor" to replace that starter. I've never touched a Lexus or Tundra, nor do I plan to.

I've replaced both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

      17 hours ago, TerryB said:

Go electric, no filter or oil!

7 hours ago, cahartley said:

 

Actually, for the casual city commuter, that's a good idea.

For the casual city commuter ... go uber or lyft: no filter, no oil, no parking/registration fees, no insurance etc.

Of course, in the not so distant future, there may not be any need to leave one's home at all.  All necessities will/may be available for on line ordering with delivery to one's doorstep, one could work at home etcetera, etcetera ...

'Tis a brave new world.

Cheers,

Grog

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the day I needed to replace the battery for my 2008 Dodge avenger and discovered that to install it you start by removing the front left wheel, open a panel in the inner wheel well, slide the battery out of the opening, etc...…...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Fleek said:

I remember the day I needed to replace the battery for my 2008 Dodge avenger and discovered that to install it you start by removing the front left wheel, open a panel in the inner wheel well, slide the battery out of the opening, etc...…...

 

Our (former) 2005 Sebring convertible (since wrecked by a person who crossed the Interstate while texting?), also had the battery in the front left wheel well. You had to remove the tire, remove the splash shield, sit on the ground, and be a contortionist to undo the battery cables - then reverse the process to reinstall. My 1959 Alfa-Romeo Giulietta Veloce had the battery conveniently located in the tunk at the rear of the car - easy access and also helped toward even weight distribution.

 

Last night I tried to find out why only one horn is now working on our 2002 Suburban since the new transmission was installed. I finally found one but could never find the other - maybe it was left out?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real question about extended oil changes is:

 

Do you want to risk getting on the bad side of this woman.

image.thumb.png.bcf68b110e65cc4c4e371809411f086f.png

Or risk a set of timing chains for your DOHC engine.

 

They took the chains... timing chains.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marty, strange how the cars we own are so similar to each other.  Your Sebring and my Avenger are close kin and I have a 2003 Tahoe to go with your  Suburban.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago I was tasked to do a tune up on a Chevrolet Monza.

The owner was complaining that it has never run right and he had had it tuned up a couple of times.

I had to undo the engine mounts and lift the engine up (A HUGE hassle if I remember right)

There is a spark plug that cannot be accessed any other way. The manual said to put a vacuum line on it to turn the spark plug but that is some kind of a joke in my opinion.

(by now someone had cracked it)

The car wasn't new and that particular plug was the original and broken. I guess all the other shops just figured that 7 was good enough.

I got a pretty good tip for making the thing run like new again.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JACK M said:

Years ago I was tasked to do a tune up on a Chevrolet Monza.

The owner was complaining that it has never run right and he had had it tuned up a couple of times.

I had to undo the engine mounts and lift the engine up (A HUGE hassle if I remember right)

There is a spark plug that cannot be accessed any other way. The manual said to put a vacuum line on it to turn the spark plug but that is some kind of a joke in my opinion.

(by now someone had cracked it)

The car wasn't new and that particular plug was the original and broken. I guess all the other shops just figured that 7 was good enough.

I got a pretty good tip for making the thing run like new again.

 

As the owner of a V-8 Monza now, I had heard all of the horror stories over the years, it really was not that bad (with a lift)  It is the #3 plug that is blocked by the steering shaft, initially they were not going to use a V-8, GM paid Mazda a ton of money to use the Wankel Rotary engine, which they bailed on prior to production and went with the common swap that was being done to the prior H bodies and put in a small block Chevy V-8. Most of those cars rotted away before they needed a second set of plugs

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2013 Chevrolet, dealer wants $450 to change a headlight bulb.  Front bumper plus other stuff has to be removed to change the bulb plus bulbs are $50 for the cheep ones or $85 or the better ones. 

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. So many PBIs. My V8 Sunbird was that way but was very easy to remove the two bolts from the mount and raise the engine to clear the shaft though was two different levels for two different plugs AFAIR. Was very reliable but like most SBCs after a certain period they would start using A Lot of oil. And plugs. After enough autocrosses though I punched the top out of the spring towers, puchcked the clutch linkage through the firewall, and was fortunate the 13x6 Vega GT wheels were common because I cracked at least one every weekend.

 

Sunbeam Tiger had two plugs you removed from inside the passenger compartment.

 

Seems that Northstars went through a big improvement when the VVT came out, was always DOHC but  after 2003 (been around since 1993) are much more reliable. As long as they have oil pressure. Have heard the Aurora ShortStar is the best for hopping up.

 

Want something fun ? From 2004 to 2007 there were a Whole Bunch of Mercedes M272 engines (V6) built with defective balance gears. No Big for a Buick V6 but for Merc meant the balance shaft had to be replaced. In true Germanic precision the Merc  had a bolt on the end of the balance shaft. Under the flex plate. The MB TSB requires removing the engine ($4,000) to replace. Was a class action suit but time has now expired for all affected e.g. SLK280s and SLK350s. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2018 at 7:01 PM, c49er said:

Have you done a Lexas or Tundra starter! 

Under the intake and not a simple job unless you are a dealer hot shot tech.

The starter in the intake valley was on the older 4.7  engines.  Not sure of all the applications that engine was used  in.

 

The  Tundra, starting in 2007  used the 5.7 engine; and the starter is in the  normal position, on the side of the engine, and bolting into the bellhousing/transmission.  

 

There is a 4.6 engine; not usually seen, in a Tundra; but available.  The 4.6 is not the same as the 4.7,  it is a more modern engine like the 5.7. Don't know where the starter is.

 

Granted the starter in the V , and under the intake is not a good idea. But never had any in my shop, on the 4.7 Tundra that needed replacement; but the Cadillac Northstar engine was another story.  But as somebody has already posted the Northstar had many more problems than the starter.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this