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Single, center post, in ground garage lift

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Anyone know where I might be able to purchase an in ground, single center post garage lift?  I am trying to avoid having to use a two post lift because of space limitations. Also, the old style, in ground lift, with the adjustable arms is ideally suited for running board cars.  The arm ends can be fitted with raised extensions to reach the frame but not crush the running boards.  All leads much appreciated.

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Good luck on that.

I think it's almost illegal to own one now days.

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You can buy brand new single post lifts. New ones use a "cassette" design that drops into a formed cavity in the floor. The downside is that the lift is in the way of most things you might want to do on the car other than tires and brakes, and maybe oil changes. You can get "truck adapters" for most two post lifts that will work to clear running boards also.

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I  bought the Truck adapters for my two post lift.  Works great with running boards. 

 

Ask the two post lift manufacturer you are considering if they have truck adapters for that lift. Danmmar  did. 

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The two post lifts with which I'm familiar come with truck adapters.  Other, non-standard adapters are readily available for two post lifts.

 

Here are some pix of available adapters: 

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=900&ei=oC-4W52BBKjt5gL-pIxo&q=two+post+lift+truck+adapters&oq=two+post+lift+tru&gs_l=img.1.0.0i24.7150.12564..16099...0.0..0.193.1566.15j2......0....1..gws-wiz-img.......0j0i30j0i5i30.xor33jdWQkM

 

Whatever you choose, a lift is a great tool.  As a matter of fact, my two post lift is the best tool this old man has ever owned.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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I am kind of a lift nut and now that I have both a drive on and a two post Rotary lift I want more. Allard Machine in Ennis, Texas has maybe five single post lifts that are flush with the floor to use with the super low sprint cars they work on. Dusty's Rod Shop on Baily, Texas has a drive on lift that is flush with the floor (no ramps) so the chopped, dropped, and bagged cars they build can roll on with a 1/4" ground clearance.  Now to the crown jewel of lifts, which of course are illegal to sell, is the one owned by a muffler shop in Bonham, Texas. It has two wheel troughs, one stationary and one on rollers. You drive through the stationary one till the front wheels fall into the rolling one and keep driving till the rear wheels drop into the stationary one. (what could possibly go wrong here?). This leaves the entire bottom of the vehicle wide open with no arms or runners in the way. The shop also has a two post lift but I wait till the "suicide" lift is open just so I can watch and covet.

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Every type has its advantages and disadvantages. If I could have only one lift, a two-post with the posts offset toward the front is a clear winner.

 

It all depends on what you want to do with it. Two-posters let the wheels hang. Four posters do not. Wheels hanging is better for almost every job. One notable exception is exhaust or driveshaft work, where you need to see the axles and suspension in the position they actually run.

 

The old single-posters came both ways. Most of them let the axles hang, but a few had a framework of long I-beams, and blocks you slid along the I-beams to pick the car up by the axles.

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10 hours ago, Bloo said:

It all depends on what you want to do with it. Two-posters let the wheels hang. Four posters do not. Wheels hanging is better for almost every job. One notable exception is exhaust or driveshaft work, where you need to see the axles and suspension in the position they actually run.

 

Actually, I've found that you need both capabilities to do exhaust work.  For cars with a solid rear axle, you typically need to have the rear suspension hanging to fit the tail pipe up over the axle, then you need to have the suspension at ride height to set clearances. I jack the car from the frame to install the pipe then lower the rear axle onto jack stands to set clearances.

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Tough to lift things off of something, with a single post lift coming out of the ground. I have three lifts, if I could only have one, it would be a two post. A one guy/gal shop can do anything by themselves with the help of a two post lift.   

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Rotary (among others) makes a two post in-ground lift that is the best of both worlds.  Just be sitting down when you inquire about pricing...

 

SL212-SW-2.jpg

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1 hour ago, joe_padavano said:

Rotary (among others) makes a two post in-ground lift that is the best of both worlds.  Just be sitting down when you inquire about pricing...

 

SL212-SW-2.jpg

 

Joe,

 

Rotary is certainly a name-brand when it comes to automotive lifts, and I can imagine that the in-ground two-poster shown is pricey.  Just what is the price range of that thing anyway?

 

How is the two-post underground lift the "best of both worlds"?  Other than possible overhead clearance problems associated with floor-mounted lifts, I don't understand the advantage of an in-ground lift.  Please advise.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Some times it looks like the bodies are just floating in the air, like magic, or a two post lift. A person has to put some thought in lifting rotten old wooded bodies. Getting the lift arms under the body some times does not work. I love watching shops on TV using 8 people to set bodies on finished cars. So easy to roll a finished frame under a lifted body, and lower it down. Glad I am not paying the labor of a 8 person crew.

auburn pictures 007.JPG

auburn pictures 008.JPG

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A floor jack can lift the body up, slide a 4x6 post under the body, sticking out past the body enough for the lift arms. Only way to go if you work by yourself. One person can tear down and build a car by themselves. with the help of a lift. If the lift is wide enough, and set up in the right spot, you can back a trailer under the lift. Set the body down, and haul to the blaster. A two post lift is a must have for any shop building/restoring cars.

37 009.jpg

Edited by Xander Wildeisen (see edit history)

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Four post drive on lift with sliding jacks.

That's what I have and consider it the only way I would go.

I've lifted bodies with it, I have also lifted boats off of their trailers with it. 

I have used two post lifts and I had to get on my knees every time and I have a hard time with that these days.

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2 hours ago, capngrog said:

 

Joe,

 

Rotary is certainly a name-brand when it comes to automotive lifts, and I can imagine that the in-ground two-poster shown is pricey.  Just what is the price range of that thing anyway?

 

How is the two-post underground lift the "best of both worlds"?  Other than possible overhead clearance problems associated with floor-mounted lifts, I don't understand the advantage of an in-ground lift.  Please advise.

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

The advantage of an in-ground lift is that you don't have posts in the way when you are not using it.  The configuration of my shop building is such that I can't install a lift without compromising access on the sides of it.  Of course, the $8K+ pricetag on that Rotary (not counting digging, forming, and pouring the cavity in the floor) means that I don't have to worry about installing one, either. ?

 

Yes, you can lift a body with it, given the correct spacing between the posts. Again, given the price tag, I haven't bothered to look into the details.

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With all of those considerations (plus needing a 7,000 lb capacity) I bought a portable (it rolls around) medium rise scissors lift. They make an inground version with no clearance issues but my cars can all handle 4" and would lose portability. Except for the control dolly the is no side clearance required. Handles both a 148" WB 21' RV and a 94.5" WB toy. (Wood was for the RV - track was too wide for the ramps & top was to the rafters so could not raise as far. Tires hang & clearance in center is 33" wide.

 

This is what worked best for me. I see the Atlas Kwik-Bay is rated at 7,000 lbs now.

"  This portable lift easily raises a 7,000 lb. car or truck to a comfortable working height and does not require the customer to position arms under the lifting points of the car. "

Look for dual pistons, full tracks (no rollers on the concrete), and a solid locking bar.

 

The only drawback for some would be you could not park a car under another one.

 

It works for me.

upside.jpg

onlift.jpg

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I guess if all you do is brakes. Maybe an oil change with those cross members in the way.

You couldn't get a transmission jack under there.

I cant work on my back anymore.

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