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Ohio: Warner's Salvage Yard, Mt. Sterling


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NOTE: The following is courtesy of Forum member "Lump" from Xenia, Ohio.  Your moderator had to reconstruct Lump's discussion because he (moderator) was unable to relocate the discussion to its own space.  Thus only the moderator's information appears to the left of this posting.

 

Well, I hate to give up my secret "honey hole," but I would like to keep this thread going for a while, if I can. 

 

In Mt Sterling, Ohio (just south of Columbus, along I-71) is located Warner's Salvage Yard. They have cars all the way back to the early 30's. Most everything is REALLY rusty. And, the owner is very, very religious, and will not tolerate foul language, etc. Seriously. 

 

Contact info: Warner's Salvage, 13501 OH-56, Mt Sterling, OH 43143, Phone: (740) 869-3532

 

No time for many photos tonight, but here are a few: 

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it's very sad to see this beautiful American car abandoned.
In France it is rare to see American skins abandoned, and if there are, they are often buy to restore them.
last week end I find a 1969 electra abandoned since 1986. it's very rare in France to see that (American car abandoned).
so I buy it to restore it :) 

 

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10 hours ago, Bruce_C said:

The chien looks very tired from all the work, but the car is safe now.

 

 

there is work, but nothing is impossible ;) .
where there's a will, there's a way .
I will start work at the end of 2019 :) 
it lacks the engine, it must redo all the floor, even the floor of the trunk. the trunk lid is also very tired, ... there is work :) 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I was at that yard in Mt Sterling, OH several times in the mid 1990s.  I'd go down on Saturday mornings when I was at Ohio State.  I don't think the yard had anything newer than the early 1980s in it.   I don't think the owner wasn't actively taking in cars more cars.  The yard was largely picked over long ago and there was a lot of brush growing around the cars, making it difficult to get to them.   The owner was a nut job.   I remember walking into the place and coming upon him and asking "are you the owner?"  His reply was "The Lord is the owner, I am the keeper."   There was a 69 or so Pontiac LeMans sitting out front that looked decent, but when I opened the door to look insode there was 3 inches of water in the floor pans.   I remember the shell of a model T coupe in there, and there was a last generation El Camino with a cap on the bed.  You don't see those often.   I haven't been there is 20 years, but it was an experience I'll never forget.  There's probably some good stuff for 1960's & newer cars there, but I believe the 1950's & older stuff is picked clean.   

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12 hours ago, K8096 said:

I was at that yard in Mt Sterling, OH several times in the mid 1990s.  I'd go down on Saturday mornings when I was at Ohio State.  I don't think the yard had anything newer than the early 1980s in it.   I don't think the owner wasn't actively taking in cars more cars.  The yard was largely picked over long ago and there was a lot of brush growing around the cars, making it difficult to get to them.   The owner was a nut job.   I remember walking into the place and coming upon him and asking "are you the owner?"  His reply was "The Lord is the owner, I am the keeper."   There was a 69 or so Pontiac LeMans sitting out front that looked decent, but when I opened the door to look insode there was 3 inches of water in the floor pans.   I remember the shell of a model T coupe in there, and there was a last generation El Camino with a cap on the bed.  You don't see those often.   I haven't been there is 20 years, but it was an experience I'll never forget.  There's probably some good stuff for 1960's & newer cars there, but I believe the 1950's & older stuff is picked clean.    

 

it's very very  sad to see :( , it's cars were so beautiful, why have they forgotten and abandoned like this ?:( 
for example this poor 1960 (?)  Cadillac  would have made happy, and instead she is out at the wrong time :'(

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The yard certainly has been "picked over" for many decades. However, if you pay careful attention, you can still find a few treasures now and again. For example, many years ago my brother-in-law and I went there "picking," and took along our 2 sons. We let the boys dig through trunks and back seats, looking for coins and other "treasures." (This kept our wives happy, while we were gone for the day. LOL). Anyway, after a while I heard the kids shouting and playing the next aisle over, and I went to investigate. They were playing cops-n-robbers or such, using something I couldn't quite make out for toy guns. When I got there, they showed me what they were using...very old brass gas pump nozzles. The old skinny kind with cast-in brass hooks on top for hanging on the old gas pumps. I asked where they got them, and they showed me a whole bucket full, which I eventually bought. A manufacturer of reproduction antique gas pumps was very happy to purchase all of them from me. And I bought the boys some gifts afterwards. ? My BIL and I also bought a 12 bolt rear end out of an early Monte Carlo that weekend, and some Packard parts that a client wanted. 

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There are LOTS of interesting cars there. But you just about have to go in the winter months, or mosquitoes, ticks, and various vermin will make your day miserable. There is nothing quite like working hard to get a stubborn, rusty old deck lid open, only to discover there was a large wasp nest inside it which is now exploding in angry stingers! LOL. (Ask me how I know!) 

 

Anyway, I LOVE going through old boneyards. First photo is an iconic 1962 Impala 2 door hardtop. Everyone loves those cars, and all this one needs is.... 

 

 

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Next, playing hide-n-seek from weed cover is a 50's Buick...looks like, maybe a 1954? 

 

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Then, what's this finned monster? A DeSoto? 

 

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I've had a several automotive relationships with 1967 Impalas. Learned to drive in a convertible. Rode to lunch with a lucky 16 year old kid who had a 67 Impala SS 427 2 door hardtop. Dated a girl who owned a 67 Chevy, and....well, you get the idea. Today I really love those "coke bottle" quarter panels and the fastback styling of these cars. Hmmm...wonder if I could save this one?

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Edited by lump (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, lump said:

There are LOTS of interesting cars there. But you just about have to go in the winter months, or mosquitoes, ticks, and various vermin will make your day miserable. There is nothing quite like working hard to get a stubborn, rusty old deck lid open, only to discover there was a large wasp nest inside it which is now exploding in angry stingers! LOL. (Ask me how I know!) 

 

Anyway, I LOVE going through old boneyards. First photo is an iconic 1962 Impala 2 door hardtop. Everyone loves those cars, and all this one needs is.... 

 

13 hours ago, lump said:

I've had a several automotive relationships with 1967 Impalas. Learned to drive in a convertible. Rode to lunch with a lucky 16 year old kid who had a 67 Impala SS 427 2 door hardtop. Dated a girl who owned a 67 Chevy, and....well, you get the idea. Today I really love those "coke bottle" quarter panels and the fastback styling of these cars. Hmmm...wonder if I could save this one?

 

why does anyone restore all that's abandoned cars? Or at least buy them and store them away the time to have the money for the restored ? :( 
I have said many times, but it makes me very sad to see this :( .
Some of these cars are very rare in France and I have never seen them.
I really like it's American cars.
I encourage you to buy this beautiful impala ! :);) 

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5 minutes ago, sebastienbuick said:

 

 

why does anyone restore all that's abandoned cars? Or at least buy them and store them away the time to have the money for the restored ? :( 
I have said many times, but it makes me very sad to see this :( .
Some of these cars are very rare in France and I have never seen them.
I really like it's American cars.
I encourage you to buy this beautiful impala ! :);) 

Well, Sebastien, that's difficult. In the first place, unlike for Camaro's, Chevelle's, Nova's, and other American muscle cars, there are very, very few replacement body panels and other parts available for 1967 Impalas. And we American collectors refer to my home state as part of the US "Rust Belt," because we use large amounts of rock salt on our roadways in winter. This makes driving much easier and safer, but it causes heavy rust damage to steel car bodies...especially cars from the 1950's through the 1970's. So, most of the old cars in my photos from this junk yard are deeply, horribly rusted away. Anything can be saved, with lots of money and lots of skills and tons of TIME. Yet the truth is that when you complete such a project on a car like this one, it won't be worth 25 percent of what you have invested in it. IF I had room and money to add a 1967 Impala, I would want to seek one from the southwestern USA, where they have no salt on the roads, and consequently not much rust either. I'm pretty sure you could get a really nice one for about 20,000 US, which is WAY cheaper than taking a wrecked and rusted hulk out of an Ohio junkyard and trying to save it. And, you could start driving it right away. 

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Yet I DO love looking at these rusted old cars, and daydreaming about saving each and every one of them. Sigh. 

 

But I must remain strong, and FOCUS! I already have one rusty Chevrolet project car in my garage, waiting for my time and money to put it back on the road. And it is one of my all-time favorites...a car I could only dream of owning when I was that young kid driving around in a 67 Impala. It is a 1970 Chevelle SS 454 car, all original, and with documentation to prove it. Right now it is covered up in my garage, awaiting me to come up with money and time, and then more money and more time. Sigh, again! 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, lump said:

Well, Sebastien, that's difficult. In the first place, unlike for Camaro's, Chevelle's, Nova's, and other American muscle cars, there are very, very few replacement body panels and other parts available for 1967 Impalas. And we American collectors refer to my home state as part of the US "Rust Belt," because we use large amounts of rock salt on our roadways in winter. This makes driving much easier and safer, but it causes heavy rust damage to steel car bodies...especially cars from the 1950's through the 1970's. So, most of the old cars in my photos from this junk yard are deeply, horribly rusted away. Anything can be saved, with lots of money and lots of skills and tons of TIME. Yet the truth is that when you complete such a project on a car like this one, it won't be worth 25 percent of what you have invested in it. IF I had room and money to add a 1967 Impala, I would want to seek one from the southwestern USA, where they have no salt on the roads, and consequently not much rust either. I'm pretty sure you could get a really nice one for about 20,000 US, which is WAY cheaper than taking a wrecked and rusted hulk out of an Ohio junkyard and trying to save it. And, you could start driving it right away. 

 

Yes I understand what you mean, it's still a sad story for all this is superb car :( 
I did a lot of car show in France (next to my home) and I still saw no impala 67 :( 
In France (in america too), there is very good boilermaker (metal worker) and his ability to rebuild a car in very bad condition.
I would very much like to launch this project (by winning the lottery) to restore all the cars you have taken photos, I will do it with great pleasure :) 

 

10 minutes ago, lump said:

Yet I DO love looking at these rusted old cars, and daydreaming about saving each and every one of them. Sigh. 

 

But I must remain strong, and FOCUS! I already have one rusty Chevrolet project car in my garage, waiting for my time and money to put it back on the road. And it is one of my all-time favorites...a car I could only dream of owning when I was that young kid driving around in a 67 Impala. It is a 1970 Chevelle SS 454 car, all original, and with documentation to prove it. Right now it is covered up in my garage, awaiting me to come up with money and time, and then more money and more time. Sigh, again!

 

At the Chevelle, I love this car :) 
I saw in a car show one Chevelle Malibu 4 doors ,
green, she was very beautiful :wub:
There was also a black chevelle ss and a gray one. :wub:
These are mythical cars and love them a lot :) 
You have a great project and I tell you good luck ;) , thank you for taking care of it car  :) 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
9 hours ago, 30DodgePanel said:

69 Electra... now that's passion 👍

 

We all know how you feel whether it's a 69 or a 29.. Very cool that you're enjoying it to this extent.

Kudos to you !

 

thank you very much, indeed I really like it's american cars :wub::wub::wub: .
I am very sad to see American cars abandoned :( , they have a whole story and they are beautiful.
If I win the lottery, I would love to do an American car restoration business (restore wrecks to give them life :) )
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