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40-Torpedo

1927-27 Buick Project

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Day 20 Of the Restoration

Hello All -

20 days ago now I brought home my first "restoration" project. For the last 10 years I have been primarily building Rat Rods and Hot Rods. When I learned of a 1927 Buick from a contractor friend that I dealt with I was intrigued. Story on the Buick was that the original owner had bought it new and drove it until 1940 when the distributor cracked. It was then pushed into the barn until my contractor friend picked it up in 1970 and took it to his shop where it sat until I brought it home to the Corral. The original owner had apparently started to disassemble the car in the late 60's but lost interest and sold it to him. 

My contractor friend was not as mechanically adept so he had lost interest in the project mostly out of frustration on how long he had it and the difficulty of finding parts. It took me some time to even get him to allow me to look at it. From what I was hearing in the meantime I was envisioning another Rat Rod build. However when I did get a chance to see it, I was rather shocked. Though it has sat in a state of disassembly since the early 1970's it was all there. Not a typical Rat Rod project where I usually start with a rough body and go from there. I loved how everything from the vacuum fuel pump to the controls on the steering wheel and even the original interior was all still there and in fairly good condition. Heck even the mechanical brakes still work. I did not have the heart to cut and hack it up. It's now going to be a working project that will remain as original as I can. The end goal is to make it a running vehicle - or as I tell folks "a large under powered go-cart that is legal to drive on the road"

the motor and the transmission seem to be in functioning condition, however just a few days after bringing it home I realized that the distributor and the missing carburetor is a problem. I began a search and then on this site - someone posted a link to a complete running and functioning drivetrain for a 1928 Buick that was only on the other side of Washington State. Road trip time! I was able to pick up the full running gear, rims, and extra parts. I know its not the same year and I could probably swap over the generator, distributor, carb, etc... but this one is a proven runner. Seems easier to just swap the motor and transmission out. First goal is to get it running around then get the body work finished and follow up with the interior.     

 

buick 27.jpg

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How is the wood in the body?  That always seems to be the big stumbling block in restoring these old Buick’s.  Looks like a nice car, glad you’re going to save it.

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That was also a deciding factor of restoring rather than cutting her up. The wood is absolutely solid with no flex at all to the body. The only damage to the wood is in the frame for the front seat where three pieces of wood have become loose due to the failure of a screw and in the door hinges. The second owner drilled out the loose screws and epoxied plugs into the wood. Both the seat and the hinge area are a simple fix.  She has only 20k on the odometer and she came from Eastern Washington which is the Arizona of the Pacific NW. Seventy eight years of dry storage is what saved it.  

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I strongly suggest you post this in the Buick Pre War section on this forum.  Those guys have lots of good advice and extensive knowledge of these old Buicks.  You’ll get quick answers to your questions.

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