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 I bought an engine once from a junkyard.

 I thought it was an engine when I looked at it, but I had to have it!

 Upon getting it home, I decided that it was in fact an engine but what kind?

 It had copper lines soldered together to form the intake manifold.

 It had an external cup, cast into the oil pan that has a shaft that went up and down from an eccentric outside of the block that turned out to be the oil pump.

 A round thing on the side of the engine turned out to be the "timer". The drive was off of the front and had a weird motor mount that held the engine in a downward angle.

 I assumed that it came out of a boat.

 I looked it up in a book that described engines of the past that contained 500 engine names.

 I determined that it was a Simplex? The description stated about what it looked like, but they didn't know who made it, when,  or where,

 I asked a few friends about it and a friend of a friend showed up and offered me $200 for it.

 I wanted it to go to a good home so I sold it.

 

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100% Buick however it might be as early as 1916, 1923 at the latest . We need better photos of the rockers and some of the other details.  There should be an engine number stamped into the crankcase . Fairly big numbers on the LH. front portion of the casting. 

 

Greg in Canada

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You can see from that side photo that it is typical of 1916.   !916 had the rocker shafts parallel to the axis of the crankshaft, and the valves (and valve guides in a straight line.)     My friend Jim Formby from Drouin gathered remains of a 1916 from a little town in the Southern Riverina, called Barellan,  where his uncle and aunt lived.    His uncle, Wellesley Whybrow,   happened to notice a little mite of an aboriginal girl , who was obsessed with the sport of tennis;  though there was really nothing in town that could carry with grace the description of "tennis court".  Yet this littlen girl could belt a tennis ball with such power and accuracy that you might never expect.    So

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20 hours ago, Roger Walling said:

 I bought an engine once from a junkyard.

 I thought it was an engine when I looked at it, but I had to have it!

 Upon getting it home, I decided that it was in fact an engine but what kind?

 It had copper lines soldered together to form the intake manifold.

 It had an external cup, cast into the oil pan that has a shaft that went up and down from an eccentric outside of the block that turned out to be the oil pump.

 A round thing on the side of the engine turned out to be the "timer". The drive was off of the front and had a weird motor mount that held the engine in a downward angle.

 I assumed that it came out of a boat.

 I looked it up in a book that described engines of the past that contained 500 engine names.

 I determined that it was a Simplex? The description stated about what it looked like, but they didn't know who made it, when,  or where,

 I asked a few friends about it and a friend of a friend showed up and offered me $200 for it.

 I wanted it to go to a good home so I sold it.

 

There was a Simplex car made in New York City before WW1. It was a very expensive hand built car, the engine could be as you describe. If it was, that was one rare motor, they made less than 100 cars a year.

 

There were other Simplex cars made in Wisconsin and in England, and a Crane Simplex made by the Simplex co with a 6 cylinder engine.

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12 hours ago, Ivan Saxton said:

My friend Jim Formby from Drouin gathered remains of a 1916 from a little town in the Southern Riverina, called Barellan,  where his uncle and aunt lived.    His uncle, Wellesley Whybrow,   happened to notice a little mite of an aboriginal girl , who was obsessed with the sport of tennis;  though there was really nothing in town that could carry with grace the description of "tennis court".  Yet this littlen girl could belt a tennis ball with such power and accuracy that you might never expect.    So

Ivan,

 

Sounds like Evonne Goolagong

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My list shows those numbers as a 1916 D- 45. As usual Ivan is spot on.  D-45 are a 5 Pas. touring and were Buicks most popular car in 1916.

I own a 1918 that is very similar, slightly longer wheelbase and several detail differences. 

Great find!

 

Greg in Canada

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Depends on what you mean by Raceabouts.  The only real Raceabout was made by Mercer. It was a road car modeled after their factory built racing car. I think that what you actually have in mind is what is commonly referred to as a speedster. 

 There were factory built speedster style cars from a number of manufacturers. The Stutz Bearcar and Mercer Raceabout are the two best known but there were a number of others from several different manufacturers. 

 As well there were many built from second hand regular production roadsters and tourings by private individuals. Some were road cars and some were racing cars. 

 

Greg in Canada

4865804575_e7796825a0_b.jpg

2_1910_VCR_Westbury_Turn_1-1a_620_469.jpg

12497_2.jpg

130635-500-0@2x.jpg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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That is also a car that I believe  was fairly recently constructed {within the last 20 years} by once again a British owner. It uses a Buick chassis and non factory body, hood, fenders , lights etc. Buick themselves did not produce a car of this sort, however several other manufactures did.  Buick produced a few sports roadsters in about the 1912 era that are generally similar to this style. However they are very rare today.

  Your link is using the description "Raceabout" as a generic description of cars of this type. "Speedster" is the term used more commonly in North America. Although most car people will recognise "Raceabout" as being close enough to correct to get the meaning.

 

Greg in Canada

 

 

 

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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Something similar I found on the Smokestak page a few weeks ago. Same basic chassis just an earlier radiator.

 

 

from Smokestack 0818.jpg

 

 

There are plans to something similar with our 1926 Pontiac - get it roadworthy etc - but we are too busy having fun with it, and doing other projects.

 

 

 

Hadstock 18 J McD photo.jpg

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