Duff71Riv

71Riviera questions

Recommended Posts

Ohio is one of the most active old car states in the country so finding like-minded individuals shouldn't be hard. Cruise night season is winding down but hit as many of those as you can, with or without the Riv. You may find a bunch of grumpy old men who wear blinders to any car other than the one they own, but you just might find yourself a mentor who loves cars and loves helping a young buck learn how to wrench- esp if said young buck has proven he likes old American iron and not rice-a-roni.

 

Plus the cruise night crowd generally knows who does quality work at fair prices, and who can find old car parts when the parts store's computer says it don't exist.

 

Get yourself the factory shop manuals for the Riv. They're not hard to find and should be reasonably cheap. You need the 1971 Buick chassis service manual and the Fisher Body manual.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My XC coach actually owns a junkyard in Lorain OH and has an amazing car collection. I always go to him if I have a question about old cars. Our small town has an old car show almost every weekend in the summer, definitely at least  one every month until it gets cold. There’s lots of old retired people with old cars which is always fun to see on runs. I once saw a Pantera go by that was really neat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, rocketraider said:

Ohio is one of the most active old car states in the country so finding like-minded individuals shouldn't be hard. Cruise night season is winding down but hit as many of those as you can, with or without the Riv. You may find a bunch of grumpy old men who wear blinders to any car other than the one they own, but you just might find yourself a mentor who loves cars and loves helping a young buck learn how to wrench- esp if said young buck has proven he likes old American iron and not rice-a-roni.

 

Plus the cruise night crowd generally knows who does quality work at fair prices, and who can find old car parts when the parts store's computer says it don't exist.

 

Get yourself the factory shop manuals for the Riv. They're not hard to find and should be reasonably cheap. You need the 1971 Buick chassis service manual and the Fisher Body manual.

 

 

 

 

 Something wrong with rice-a-roni ? Explain please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have nothing against old Japanese cars, in fact I have a sweet spot in my heart for old RX7s. I just don’t like the unnecessary spoilers for a FWD Honda or wheels with 45 degree camber.. etc. The 80s 90s and 00s Japanese cars seem to be more prone to a cheap unnecessary mod (probably because of their cheap prices) but I guess the same attitude could be felt for people who build rat rods, which I for one love.  Although if it gets people into cars it can’t be too bad. I guess it’s all a matter of taste so I’m sorry if the term offended anyone. I just never heard rocketraiders “rice-a-roni “ before and thought it was humorous. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Duff71Riv said:

I have nothing against old Japanese cars, in fact I have a sweet spot in my heart for old RX7s. I just don’t like the unnecessary spoilers for a FWD Honda or wheels with 45 degree camber.. etc. The 80s 90s and 00s Japanese cars seem to be more prone to a cheap unnecessary mod (probably because of their cheap prices) but I guess the same attitude could be felt for people who build rat rods, which I for one love.  Although if it gets people into cars it can’t be too bad. I guess it’s all a matter of taste so I’m sorry if the term offended anyone. I just never heard rocketraiders “rice-a-roni “ before and thought it was humorous. 

 Well the unnecessary stuff ends up on a lot of cars these days, not just Japanese cars. Ever see the shameful things that is happening in the old VW scene? The de cambered slammed Beetles. Dr. Porsche would be appalled. I think it's more on the people's shoulders than the brand they are driving.

 The Asian cars, and the Japanese in  particular and not the German cars were the cars that gave American car makers a wake up call so that today the American cars make a decent product although today it's hard to tell "who is who" in the industry unless you were a part of it or at least studied it.

 With the threat of tariffs against Japanese auto firms in the late 70's and early 80's the Japanese decided it was better to make their cars here. So they have design centers, Motor Sports,  product planning, marketing, Technical centers, Test Centers,  Engineering,  Special Tools, Accessory development,  foundries, and manufacturing and American Jobs!

 By avoiding tariffs by being in the U.S.A. , they also realized that the closer you are to your customers the better the product will be to fit the needs of the customer. So when I say it's hard to tell who is who it really means Japanese cars today have just as much and in reality more U.S. content than so called American cars.

 I wish they were more a part of the Collector Car market though.

Edited by Pfeil (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Pfeil said:

 Well the unnecessary stuff ends up on a lot of cars these days, not just Japanese cars. Ever see the shameful things that is happening in the old VW scene? The de cambered slammed Beetles. Dr. Porsche would be appalled. I think it's more on the people's shoulders than the brand they are driving.

 The Asian cars, and the Japanese in  particular and not the German cars were the cars that gave American car makers a wake up call so that today the American cars make a decent product although today it's hard to tell "who is who" in the industry unless you were a part of it or at least studied it.

 With the threat of tariffs against Japanese auto firms in the late 70's and early 80's the Japanese decided it was better to make their cars here. So they have design centers, Motor Sports,  product planning, marketing, Technical centers, Test Centers,  Engineering,  Special Tools, Accessory development,  foundries, and manufacturing and American Jobs!

 By avoiding tariffs by being in the U.S.A. , they also realized that the closer you are to your customers the better the product will be to fit the needs of the customer. So when I say it's hard to tell who is who it really means Japanese cars today have just as much and in reality more U.S. content than so called American cars.

 I wish they were more a part of the Collector Car market though.

I do agree. The collector car market is not as strong for old JDM cars, but it seems to be growing especially with the start of these new shows such as JDM Legends etc. They are really neat cars and differ so much from big brash American cars. Rotary engines especially fascinate me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Pfeil said:

Something wrong with rice-a-roni ? Explain please.

 

This is one of those things that if it has to be explained you will never understand.

 

"likes please"

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best way to get rid of rust spot is to replace the fender.  I don't know how hard they are to find.  It appears to be in a place where new metal could be welded in or find a donor fender that is good there and cut and weld a patch panel.  The unknown is how much rust damage is in the fender supports and cowl.  You won't know until you remove the fender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, ol' yeller said:

Best way to get rid of rust spot is to replace the fender.  I don't know how hard they are to find.  It appears to be in a place where new metal could be welded in or find a donor fender that is good there and cut and weld a patch panel.  The unknown is how much rust damage is in the fender supports and cowl.  You won't know until you remove the fender.

So you wouldn’t recommend bondo? I figured it was a cheap solution and probably not the best

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You asked for the best way, not the cheapest way.  Bondo over a rust hole is a temporary fix at best.  It never lasts for very long.  It doesn't cost that much to do a repair correctly and you learn a new skill along the way.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, JACK M said:

 

This is one of those things that if it has to be explained you will never understand.

 

"likes please"

Oh I get it alright. It's the San Francisco Treat.?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎9‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 7:15 PM, Duff71Riv said:

No I actually just had the car looked over by a mechanic cuz it was sitting for a LONG time.

 

Getting it checked by  mechanic was the best thing you could do. A lot can go wrong when a car sits a long time and those things should be fixed before you worry about the sound. Pay special attention to the brakes which have rubber parts that deteriorate with time even (or maybe especially) if they are not used. Brakes are more important than a muffler.

 

Congratulations with the Riviera. They are beautiful cars. I was lucky enough to have a dad who let me get my first car -- an antique needing lots of attention-- at age 15.  Sixty years later I'm still into cars.

 

Don

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does your highschool or school district offer autobody or mechanic courses? DK what you might get  into trying to enroll in a community or technical college summer program at 15, but it's worth looking into.

 

That's actually not a heinous repair. Cut the rotted metal out and tack weld a piece of sheetmetal in, then do the finish work with GOOD quality plastic filler- the kind you get at a body shop supply store.Then prime, and use closest match you can find in a spray bomb till you can get the car painted.

 

I talked with an 18-year old at a local show yesterday. He has a barn find 67 Cougar that seems much like your Riv. Boys your age are the future of the old car hobby and I will support you 100%.

 

Re: rice-a-roni. I like a lot of the Japanese cars. I owned several Celicas and Supras years ago, and wish we could get the performance variants here. But the picnic-table spoilers, fart-can mufflers and the like make the cars a complete joke IMHO. Yes, more a reflection of the owners than the cars. And yes, you see a lot of modern American-brand compacts dyked out the same way. Those are an even bigger joke.

 

Pfeil, try to remember that not all of us here are in the Republik of Kalifornia. We know that state is very restrictive on what can be done to any vehicle. I am truly thankful to live out in the hinterlands of southern Virginia where we're not subjected to all that eco-nazi shit.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks!! My parents don’t really care about old cars but my great grandpa owned a few Buick dealerships and this was his baby. When he passed away the car went to my grandparents who drove it for a few months but stopped and it sat for 13 years. Over the summer they gave it to me to fix up and I got it running again and did everything I could without expert machinery. The tires and stuff I had the mechanic do and I had him check my work to make sure I didn’t mess up : )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rocketraider, my high school doesn’t, I’m pretty much one of the inly kids who likes old cars. My other buddies have a few old cars (one has a super bee and another a 75 trans am) but the town next to us has a mechanic program and we are allowed to attend them. Sadly I’m in too many AP college courses right now to take an auto class so I just kinda learn from mistakes. I started on go karts ans mini bikes but I sold those to pay for some parts. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as you're balancing your AP stuff with practical knowledge. 50 years ago in 4-H Club the motto was "Learn by Doing".  I'm pleased to know you won't be one of these idiots with a master's degree or doctorate who wouldn't be able to make a simple household repair. I have known many ppl with master's degrees who couldn't change out a faulty light switch.

 

I live close enough to Virginia International Raceway that I see a lot of exotics around, though I have yet to see a Pantera come thru here. I did once have to lead a lost Lamborghini Murcielago thru the backroads to get to the track. Guy had to be very aware of road crowns...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live about an hour from Norwalk OH, and the Mid Ohio Raceway where they hold the Ohio mile. Those are really cool events and my grandpa used to drag race in Norwalk. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most AP nerds in my class just play video games. I figured working on old cars is more worthwhile. It’s definitly worth it when u pull up to a high school event or when I go to XC practice and everyone knows “that must be duff in that old car” 

They just have so much more character

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rocketraider said:

 

 

Pfeil, try to remember that not all of us here are in the Republik of Kalifornia. We know that state is very restrictive on what can be done to any vehicle. I am truly thankful to live out in the hinterlands of southern Virginia where we're not subjected to all that eco-nazi shit.

 Actually the EPA ( Federal Government) has all this ( especially after 1975 ) anti tampering laws already on the books. Enforcing them is another story, however you are responsible for what you do to a automobile.

I'm new here to the forum, do no live in Ca. but I did read and agree to this;

"You agree, through your use of this private forum, that you will not post any material which is knowingly false and/or defamatory, inaccurate, abusive or provoking tone, containing vulgar or profane language, threatening, harassing, hateful, sexually oriented, or containing personal attacks, or that are considered offensive of otherwise inappropriate by the moderators will be deleted. Certain conduct could result in revocation of AACA membership as outlined in the AACA By-Laws. Forum users unwilling to comply with the requests of the moderators or who ignore these guidelines will be banned. Moderators reserve the right to limit the time that a thread may be run. You agree not to post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you or by this forum.

"eco-Nazi s..t" and you are a Moderator???

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't California have the highest ethanol percentage in its gas out of all the states? That must be quite harmful to old carburetted cars, especially if they sit with gas in them. I remember Roadkill did an episode and the California gas just ate away at the carb. I got the Riviera started on gas sitting for a dozen years, which in hindsight was a poor idea, but it still ran. I did drain it after though and it was basically a paint thinner/varnish. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...