Topper1961

1964 Buick Rear Control Arm Bushing

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Hi guys!

Need help and advice,  Just took the rear control arms to the blaster to clean off the rust.  Having much trouble finding "new" bushings for them though.  Strange size, (leave it to Buick), sent one of the old ones to CARS to match up if they can, local NAPA couldn't do anything for us.  There are some on a site, but they look much different and are 70+ each, ouch, times 6.

 

Car one year only built on the Wildcat platform , 1964 Lesabre Estate wagon, 425 super Wildcat engine, 400 ST and POSI TRACK   

 

Specs, see attached pictures:
 
Outside diameter:  1.88"
Overall length: 3.28"
Sleeve length: 2.83"  this is where the trouble is, length, found shorter ones.
Bulge near collar to end: 2.48"
Bolt hole: 1/2"

 

Hope anyone can help out 

 

Thanks

 

 

 

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Use the search feature; there are discussions about this.  To summarize, use a shorter bushing and shim the end.  That's what Rare Parts does for the $85 each that they're asking.  Or you can buy bushings for a '65-76 Cadillac (ACDelco 45G11006), then make yourself some spacers from 3/4" or 1" bar stock.

 

To elaborate further:

- Bushings: https://www.rockauto.com/en/parts/acdelco,45G11006,control+arm+bushing,7532.  NB: These come two in a box. You only need to order three to do all 6 bushings.

- Spacer material: https://www.mcmaster.com/7767T72

- Lock washers: https://www.mcmaster.com/91074a133

 

I put the lock washers between the spacer and the frame bracket to duplicate the function of the serrated end on the original bushings.  I figure that will grab better than the flat end on a plain spacer.

 

As a general lesson: never press out bushings unless you have replacements in hand. ;) 

Edited by KongaMan (see edit history)
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As KM says, do a search on the Riviera Owners forum.  Lots of discussion and DIY advice with pictures.  

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When you do get the replacement items, use only "just snug" when you put it all together.  Then do the final torque with the car sitting on the ground, after possibly a few bounces to ensure there is no residual "tension" on the rubber.  THEN do the final torque of the fasteners.  This keeps the rubber in a more neutral position, rather than being pre-loaded/twisted as the car sits on the ground, making things last longer.  Do this with ANY suspension-related rubber bushing/insulator which twists as one of its normal function.

 

NTX5467

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Because it's such a PITA to get to these bolts with the car on the ground, you can also jack it up by the pumpkin and put jackstands under the axle.  Or jack it up and put the rear wheels on a stack of 2x8s.  Or find a buddy with a drive-on lift. ;) 

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Thanks for all advice's, sometimes in is good enough to fix things to work with twist an tweaks, however ended up with the expensive ones from Jamco. Most pricey bushing I ever bought. According to Glen the original owner of CARS Inc, there were never any aftermarket bushings for these cars, you had to buy new arms with the bushings in them. Not surprised, a typical Buick way to complicate things.  

 

Anyway - save a Buick!

 

 

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Have to buy the bars new with bushings already in them?  That's common in the OEMs as that's the way THEY purchase them from the vendor.  That way, no additional assembly required at the assembly plant.  BUT, back then, those bushings had to come from somewhere and were probably in a suspension catalog somewhere (other than a Buick GM parts book).

 

Remember, too, that in the earlier '60s, finding a shop with a hydraulic press might be "a trick".  Then getting the bushing in the hole "square" could be another issue.  Not that it couldn't be done, just some extra effort involved.  So "buy new" was the best way out for most customers, back then.

 

One other option might be to use two shorter bushings, putting one in from each side of the arm.  Making sure the two make up the same total length of the one OEM bushing.

 

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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