Sign in to follow this  
Xander Wildeisen

1932 Auburn

Recommended Posts

This is frequently done with unusual cars. Selling unique vehicles implies a limited set of potential buyers. Exposure in metropolitan areas with car culture demographics makes sense. What a "find" ! Thanks for the heads-up, "X" ! I sure hope this car ends up in an AACA member's garage.   -  Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, vintagerodshop said:

SSSHHHHHH! phone call made.

 

Which one?  I love the steam car but I have a feeling it is going to require quite a bit of engineering work so that you don't blow yourself up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

Which one?  I love the steam car but I have a feeling it is going to require quite a bit of engineering work so that you don't blow yourself up.

Coup eh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As tempting as the coupe would be because of originality (is that paint original?  Looks like an odd shade for 32). I really like a car without a top. I had to run an errand today and my wife told me to take her Rabbit conv't (probably because it was out of gas so I would fill it up for her) and I really miss having a roadworthy conv't.  The steam would be cool,  but to drive it,  unless I was really happy with the engineering,  it would be put back to original, so I'm really paying a premium for parts I would crate up and store in the corner. If my garage hadn't eaten up every bit of spare change I had,  I would have persued the Auburn Convertible that was on ebay recently.  Seemed reasonably priced. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What makes the steam car so cool is the engine conversion in period.  Next time Pebble does a steam class that car could be there and you would have the best looking Steam car of all time, unless the Doble Murphy showed up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonder what exactly is the steam conversion and what does the patent cover? Is there perhaps a Doble engine hiding in it and what is the boiler/burner design? Did it ever run after steam conversion? Also, I couldn't find the asking price. Since steam conversions were generally unsuccessful the question is how much of the original Auburn was modified. How much work would there be to take this great car back to the original.

Edited by A. Ballard 35R
Additional comments. (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Zimm63 said:

Why advertise a car in San Diego thats in Maryland?  Scam?

That guy contacted me six months ago. It is a legit. car,  a bit too rich for my blood.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

No one answered.  Is that an original Auburn Color for that year? 

Yes, the flash makes it look brighter than it actually is. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would certainly guess not Auburn............... looks like 70s Hot Wheels to me.

 

wouldnt worry a bit about the top

 

send it to Xander, he'll cut it for you and give it a Cali conversion! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have never guessed that would have been correct,  OF course the high metallic looking glare by the flash would explain why it's so Bright.  That's the one thing i Didn't' like with Auburn, in the early 30's was the Coupe tops especially padded make the car have almost a mushroom appearance.  It makes the top over accentuated.  Maybe that's why I like the open cars better.

i'm pretty sure the ACD guys would frown upon a Carson style conversion. ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, A. Ballard 35R said:

Also, I couldn't find the asking price.

 In the ad on the right hand side it shows an asking price of $63,000 for the steam powered Auburn.

 

 

Edited by 1937-44 (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is also a link to more pictures and some of the paperwork: http://www.mellowarea.com/auburnpapers/index.html.

 

From dates on the notes it looks like the conversion may have been done in the 1950's.  It appears the patent was based on the application of the switch. The reference to superheat and the oven thermometer lead me to believe it is an example of good old Missouri pseudoscience. "Piece of history" right in there with the 100 mile carburetor the oil companies bought and hid away... what's in the trunk!

Bernie

 

Edit: If it did move under its own power when built, any old boiler guy should be able to get it running without blowing up the shop. Just check the safety relief valve and keep a close eye on that questionable switch.

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

I would have never guessed that would have been correct,  OF course the high metallic looking glare by the flash would explain why it's so Bright.  That's the one thing i Didn't' like with Auburn, in the early 30's was the Coupe tops especially padded make the car have almost a mushroom appearance.  It makes the top over accentuated.  Maybe that's why I like the open cars better.

i'm pretty sure the ACD guys would frown upon a Carson style conversion. ;) 

This is the black top option with a  minimum of padding.  The flash and the lighting make a difference. The accent color on the car is a blue green, but it shows up as blue with the LED lighting.  Sorry, no chop top for me. 

IMG_2664.JPG

IMG_2665.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's not so bad.  I could probably live with that.

I know it's all original but buy maybe a dark green or black top would help that coupe. 

From the back the top doesn't look so tall.   Maybe it's because the door window opening is so long.  Or the quarter/ corner of the top is so short.  A 32 Ford or even Mopar seems to have a longer section of roof behind the door. 

I guess Auburn got so much else right,  they couldn't make every one perfect. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

1929 Auburn Model 125F Cabriolet.  It is a totally original car that has sat in a garage since 1962.  It has its original engine and transmission.  It is likely the most unique Auburn in the world as it was converted to steam in Circa 1934 by its original owner who invented some technology related to steam power and wished to put it to use prior to applying for a US patent.

 

This just doesn't read right to me.

Totally original but converted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That cant be, The ad says original engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this