hidden_hunter

What's your most 'unexpected' part find?

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  Back in the 80's when I was fresh out of high school I was hanging out at a friends farm and I noticed his older brother's '67 gto sitting in the weeds. He'd been recently married and was starting a family and hadn't run it for a while. His brother happened by and mentioned he'd like to sell it....$500 cash! We aired up the tires, put in some fresh gas and a battery and the 400 cranked right up. An original paint, rust free '67 gto was mine!

  A short time later I happened by an auto repair shop in the same neighborhood. I was chatting with the owner and happened to mention the gto purchase. He said "I have something back here you might be interested in". We walked to the back of the garage and he pulled a dusty, dirty item off a shelf and blew the dust off it. When he turned around I could see a manifold with 3 carbs......yep, a complete factory 389 tri-power setup! I think I paid $40 for it. Man, I really wish I still had that car.

 

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All - I am restoring the only Kissel Model 6-38 Sedanlette of and year that exists. This model car is the immediate precursor to the famed Kissel Gold Bug cars. It has special fittings and windshield. It is a roadster with a removable carved wood hardtop. When I got the car, It was a hulk, and it had no windshield. Because this car is very very rare, I was sure that I would be stuck having to make anything missing. 

        I’ve now been restoring it for three years now. This past winter, out of the blue, I got a call from a person in Minnesota who was getting rid of Kissel parts.

        Low and behold when I drove there and inspected the parts, he had a NOS 1918 Kissel Sedanlette windshield sitting with his cache of other parts. And he had a bunch more o f other great Kissel goodies. Wow.

       Thanks, Ron 

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Ron,

 

so much respect for your saving a dying marque.

future generations will be able to see what Kissels really were, other then just looking at brochures!

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I LOVE this thread! Kudos to "Hidden Hunter" for starting it! 

 

Several years ago, when I was first getting started in the business of setting up and running automotive swap meet events, I would do ANYTHING I could think of to promote the shows (that is, anything that didn't cost much money...since I was totally broke!)

 

One time I even took my beloved old 1923 Hupmobile touring, and put it in an indoor display at a huge local flea market for the weekend. It was surrounded by stanchions with velvet "rope", and lots of free flyers and posters. I INTENDED to sit with the car all weekend long. But on Saturday morning a family emergency came up, and I was forced to leave my precious old car there all day and all night Saturday, alone. I hoped and prayed that it would be unmolested and ok when I arrived on Sunday, the next day.

 

Come Sunday I was unable to get there until mid afternoon, and by then the crowd was mostly gone...as were nearly all of the vendors. I was worried sick about what I would find as I pulled up to my beloved old Hupp, but to my delight and relief, it was just as I left it; untouched and undamaged. Whew! I immediately started getting it ready to drive home. But while I was working, I heard someone say, “Oh, WOW! You’re finally here! I’ve been waiting all weekend for you to show up!

 

As I turned around to see who was talking, a man stood there holding an old screw-style cast iron jack…the kind we’ve all seen MILLIONS of at every car event or flea market we go to. Right away I mentally wrote this guy off as someone who knew nothing about old cars…someone who ASSUMED that a crude old floor jack must be a priceless treasure.

 

I greeted the man, and explained why I hadn’t been with my car all weekend. He then held up his floor jack, and said something like, “I’m a vendor here, and I’ve been dying to show this antique jack to you. It’s for an antique Hupmobile, just like yours. I thought you might want it.”

 

Of course, I smiled as kindly as I could, and began explaining to to this "poor, uninformed person" that there were millions of jacks like that which were made by aftermarket companies, and sold through hardware stores and car dealerships. I told him that when old cars were junked over the decades, everyone KEPT the jacks, so they were not rare, nor valuable. Moreover, they were not even very safe to use as a jack, for that matter. Most importantly, they were not for any specific brand of car.

 

He was unfazed by my explanation and my condescending attitude. He replied, “No, I know all about all those old aftermarket jacks. But this one says ‘Hupmobile’ on the handle in raised cast-iron script letters!”

 

I looked more closely at the jack, and then at the handle...in disbelief...and then I had to apologize. When I asked how much, he said, “$40 FIRM!” I paid the man, and drove home with my treasure, feeling a little embarrassed, a little foolish, and THRILLED with the jack. It's the only one like it that I have ever seen.

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Jack w Hupmobile script cropped 1.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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I hope I'm not too far off subj.

In 1979 I was trolling Carlisle PA wearing a cardboard sign; "Maserati parts wanted". I had a 1961 3500gt at the time.  Carlisle was an unlikely place to find Maserati stuff, but a vendor spoke up and gave me the phone # of a garage (in PA) where a homeless Maserati was said to be languishing. It turned out to be a complete and rare 1956 Maserati A6G 2000 Allemano,  1 of 21 built.  I payed little for it,  sheltered it for 35 yrs. untouched and sold it not long ago for $$$,$$$.  

Edited by drwatson (see edit history)
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On 9/11/2018 at 11:56 AM, michel88 said:

I was at fall Carlisle with my wife about 15 years ago.  I had a '60 Mercury Montclaire that had a script chrome piece that said "Montclaire"on the rear quarter.  This is fairly low production car and I thought it would be hard to find.  My wife has a good eye for finding parts at Hershey and Carlisle, so I got her to look at the script when we left in the morning.  She found it in a pile of many pieces of trim on a tarp within the first hour.

there is no e in the montclair name

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