fused2x

VACUUM PUMP OR ELECTRIC PUMP

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I have a 1923 Columbia it has a six cylinder Continental engine with a Stromberg updraft carberator and I put an electric fuel pump with a fuel regulator in it. At idle even with the regulator turned all the way down it floods the carb out so I was thinking of going back to the vacuum pump but keep the electric for when I need it. I am just not sure how to go about doing this.Do I run one fuel line from the tank to the vacuum pump and another from tank to electric pump and then to vacuum pump or will the vacuum pump pull the gas through the electric pump and regulator or two different lines to the carb? I guess I am just asking for help. Thanks in advance Bob

 

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Trash the electric pump,no need for it.All the car's we have ,now operate on vacuum tanks.The car ran on the tank in the day,still will.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The car ran on it in the day.

Edited by old car fan (see edit history)
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fused2x

I threw away the electric fuel pump on my first car when I had similar flooding problems, and have used the original vacume tanks for the next twenty years, with great success. these cars were made to operate with vacume tanks!

One of my cars, the 1921, had an electric fuel pump on it only for priming, when I bought it. The car runs on the vacume tank otherwise. This setup seems to work well, and saves the mess of manually priming the vacume tank.

My opinion. RON HAUSMANN P.E.

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When they’re properly setup it doesn’t actually take that long to draw fuel through when the vac tank is bone dry. 10 seconds or so is enough on a 26 Buick to get it started 

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I'll add to the other responders, the electric pump is too much. There have been others that have successfully used electric pumps, but with a lot of trial and error. Like others have said, a properly working vacuum tank will feed the Stromberg well. Consider using a gas tank sealer in the outer tank. Something I experienced but not mentioned is verify the brass carb float is not submerging. My float material was so thin, the gas would seep through the brass. An epoxy coating solved that issue though in hindsight, a good coating of copper electroplating may have been a better solution, given long term exposure to gas and weight of epoxy vs copper plating to keep the float level calibrated.

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I have been running an electric fuel pump with a regulator on a '28 Chrysler for some time now. No problems.

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I have an electric fuel pump on my '21 Franklin. Use it only to fill up the vacuum tank reservoir when I haven't driven it for a while.

 

I alway run on my vacuum tank. Have done so for over 18 years with no problems (knock on wood).

 

The secret is, if your vacuum tank is running well, then leave it alone. 

 

Check previous forum posts. There are several vacuum tank rebuilders people recommend. Get it to work and then leave it alone.

 

Good luck. Let us know what happens.

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There are several threads in this forum about people who have replaced/rebuilt vacuum tanks and then had some small problems. The advice given is worth reading ahead of time. 

 

The knowledge base and the people who give advice here continues to amaze me. 

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